Commit 444246ca authored by Karl Berry's avatar Karl Berry

fix overfull/underfull boxes

parent 33cd9ed8
2006-07-03 Karl Berry <karl@gnu.org>
* emacs.texi (\hbadness): set to 6000 so we aren't bothered by
not-too-underfull hboxes in the TeX output.
* abbrevs.texi, buffers.texi, building.texi, calendar.texi,
cmdargs.texi, custom.texi, dired.texi, macos.texi,
maintaining.texi, misc.texi, mule.texi, programs.texi, rmail.texi,
sending.texi, text.texi: fix overfull/underfull boxes.
2006-07-03 Romain Francoise <romain@orebokech.com>
* m-x.texi (M-x): Fix.
......
......@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ to turn on Abbrev mode first. It may also be useful together with a
special set of abbrev definitions for making several global replacements at
once. This command is effective even if Abbrev mode is not enabled.
Expanding an abbrev runs the hook @code{pre-abbrev-expand-hook}
Expanding any abbrev first runs the hook @code{pre-abbrev-expand-hook}
(@pxref{Hooks}).
@need 1500
......
......@@ -575,7 +575,7 @@ buffer name. To select one, customize the variable
For instance, the @code{forward} naming method puts part of the
directory name at the beginning of the buffer name; using this method,
buffers visiting @file{/u/mernst/tmp/Makefile} and
buffers visiting @file{/u/rms/tmp/Makefile} and
@file{/usr/projects/zaphod/Makefile} would be named
@samp{tmp/Makefile} and @samp{zaphod/Makefile}, respectively (instead
of @samp{Makefile} and @samp{Makefile<2>}).
......
......@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ line of the @samp{*compilation*} buffer changes to say @samp{exit}
@samp{run}.
@findex kill-compilation
Starting a new compilation also kills any compilation
Starting a new compilation also kills any compilation already
running in @samp{*compilation*}, as the buffer can only handle one
compilation at any time. However, @kbd{M-x compile} asks for
confirmation before actually killing a compilation that is running.
......@@ -850,21 +850,17 @@ you are debugging.
If @code{gdb-many-windows} is non-@code{nil}, then @kbd{M-x gdb}
displays the following frame layout:
@example
@smallexample
@group
+--------------------------------+--------------------------------+
| | |
| GUD buffer (I/O of GDB) | Locals buffer |
| | |
|--------------------------------+--------------------------------+
| | |
| Source buffer | I/O buffer for debugged pgm |
| | |
|--------------------------------+--------------------------------+
| | |
| Stack buffer | Breakpoints buffer |
| | |
+--------------------------------+--------------------------------+
@end example
@end group
@end smallexample
However, if @code{gdb-use-separate-io-buffer} is @code{nil}, the I/O
buffer does not appear and the source buffer occupies the full width
......@@ -1322,7 +1318,7 @@ change. This keeps the Lisp world in step with the source file.
@vindex eval-expression-print-level
@vindex eval-expression-print-length
@vindex eval-expression-debug-on-error
The customizable variables @code{eval-expression-print-level} and
The two customizable variables @code{eval-expression-print-level} and
@code{eval-expression-print-length} control the maximum depth and length
of lists to print in the result of the evaluation commands before
abbreviating them. @code{eval-expression-debug-on-error} controls
......
......@@ -1500,7 +1500,8 @@ iCalendar data; for example with the Rmail mail client one could use:
and adds the results to an Emacs diary file. For example:
@example
(icalendar-import-file "/here/is/calendar.ics" "/there/goes/ical-diary")
(icalendar-import-file "/here/is/calendar.ics"
"/there/goes/ical-diary")
@end example
@noindent
......
......@@ -653,15 +653,15 @@ changing any environment or registry settings.
@pindex addpm, MS-Windows installation program
@cindex registry, setting environment variables and resources on MS-Windows
On MS-Windows, the installation program @command{addpm.exe} adds values
for @env{emacs_dir}, @env{EMACSLOADPATH}, @env{EMACSDATA},
Under MS-Windows, the installation program @command{addpm.exe} adds
values for @env{emacs_dir}, @env{EMACSLOADPATH}, @env{EMACSDATA},
@env{EMACSPATH}, @env{EMACSDOC}, @env{SHELL} and @env{TERM} to the
@file{HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE} section of the system registry, under
@file{/Software/GNU/Emacs}. It does this because there is no standard
place to set environment variables across different versions of
Windows. Running @command{addpm.exe} is no longer strictly
necessary in recent versions of Emacs, but if you are upgrading from
an older version, running @command{addpm.exe} ensures that you do not have
Windows. Running @command{addpm.exe} is no longer strictly necessary
in recent versions of Emacs, but if you are upgrading from an older
version, running @command{addpm.exe} ensures that you do not have
older registry entries from a previous installation, which may not be
compatible with the latest version of Emacs.
......
......@@ -664,12 +664,12 @@ appear as well (even if not already loaded). However, the subgroups'
own contents are not included.
@findex customize-apropos
To control more precisely what to customize, you can use @kbd{M-x
customize-apropos}. You specify a regular expression as argument;
then all @emph{loaded} settings and groups whose names match this
regular expression are set up in the customization buffer. If you
specify an empty regular expression, this includes @emph{all} loaded
groups and settings---which takes a long time to set up.
For a more general way of controlling what to customize, you can use
@kbd{M-x customize-apropos}. You specify a regular expression as
argument; then all @emph{loaded} settings and groups whose names match
this regular expression are set up in the customization buffer. If
you specify an empty regular expression, this includes @emph{all}
loaded groups and settings---which takes a long time to set up.
@findex customize-changed
When you upgrade to a new Emacs version, you might want to consider
......@@ -1482,7 +1482,7 @@ just like @key{RET}. This is used mainly for Mocklisp compatibility.
@code{minibuffer-local-must-match-map} is for strict completion and
for cautious completion.
@item
@code{minibuffer-local-filename-completion-map} and
Finally, @code{minibuffer-local-filename-completion-map} and
@code{minibuffer-local-must-match-filename-map} are like the two
previous ones, but they are specifically for file name completion.
They do not bind @key{SPC}.
......
......@@ -1215,11 +1215,11 @@ function @code{file-attributes}). This expression is evaluated for
each pair of like-named files, and if the expression's value is
non-@code{nil}, those files are considered ``different''.
For instance, @code{M-x dired-compare-directories @key{RET} (>
mtime1 mtime2) @key{RET}} marks files newer in this directory than in
the other, and marks files older in the other directory than in this
one. It also marks files with no counterpart, in both directories, as
always.
For instance, the sequence @code{M-x dired-compare-directories
@key{RET} (> mtime1 mtime2) @key{RET}} marks files newer in this
directory than in the other, and marks files older in the other
directory than in this one. It also marks files with no counterpart,
in both directories, as always.
@cindex drag and drop, Dired
On the X window system, Emacs supports the ``drag and drop''
......
......@@ -47,6 +47,7 @@ Software Foundation raise funds for GNU development.''
@c Do this inside @tex for now, so current makeinfo does not complain.
@tex
@fonttextsize 10
\global\hbadness=6000 % don't worry about not-too-underfull boxes
@end tex
@defcodeindex op
......
......@@ -312,12 +312,16 @@ characters other than Chinese, Japanese, and Korean ones are drawn using
the former by default.
@acronym{ATSUI}-compatible fonts have maker name @code{apple} and
charset @code{iso10646-1}. For example 12-point Monaco can be specified
by the name
@samp{-apple-monaco-medium-r-normal--12-*-*-*-*-*-iso10646-1}. Note
that it must be specified in a format containing 14 @samp{-}s (i.e., not
by @samp{-apple-monaco-medium-r-normal--12-*-iso10646-1}) because every
@acronym{ATSUI}-compatible font is a scalable one.
charset @code{iso10646-1}. For example, 12-point Monaco can be specified
by the name:
@example
-apple-monaco-medium-r-normal--12-*-*-*-*-*-iso10646-1
@end example
Note that it must be specified in a format containing 14 @samp{-}s
(e.g., not by @samp{-apple-monaco-medium-r-normal--12-*-iso10646-1}),
because every @acronym{ATSUI}-compatible font is a scalable one.
QuickDraw Text fonts have maker name @code{apple} and various charset
names other than @code{iso10646-1}. Native Apple fonts in Mac Roman
......
......@@ -119,11 +119,11 @@ between them.
You should put a copyright notice and permission notice at the
end of the change log file. Here is an example:
@example
@smallexample
Copyright 1997, 1998 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copying and distribution of this file, with or without modification, are
permitted provided the copyright notice and this notice are preserved.
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
Of course, you should substitute the proper years and copyright holder.
......
......@@ -1331,7 +1331,7 @@ automatically when you finish with them.
@subsection Invoking @code{emacsclient}
To run the @code{emacsclient} program, specify file names as arguments,
and optionally line numbers as well. Do it like this:
and optionally line numbers as well, like this:
@example
emacsclient @r{@{}@r{[}+@var{line}@r{[}@var{column}@r{]}@r{]} @var{filename}@r{@}}@dots{}
......@@ -1352,10 +1352,10 @@ return.
@code{emacsclient}, then it returns immediately. (You can take as
long as you like to edit the files in Emacs.)
The option @samp{--alternate-editor=@var{command}} is useful when
running @code{emacsclient} in a script. It specifies a command to run
if @code{emacsclient} fails to contact Emacs. For example, the
following setting for the @var{EDITOR} environment variable will
The option @samp{--alternate-editor=@var{command}} specifies a
command to run if @code{emacsclient} fails to contact Emacs. This is
useful when running @code{emacsclient} in a script. For example, the
following setting for the @env{EDITOR} environment variable will
always give you an editor, even if no Emacs server is running:
@example
......@@ -1363,8 +1363,8 @@ EDITOR="emacsclient --alternate-editor emacs +%d %s"
@end example
@noindent
The environment variable @var{ALTERNATE_EDITOR} has the same effect, but
the value of the @samp{--alternate-editor} takes precedence.
The environment variable @env{ALTERNATE_EDITOR} has the same effect, with
the value of the @samp{--alternate-editor} option taking precedence.
@pindex emacs.bash
Alternatively, the file @file{etc/emacs.bash} defines a bash
......
......@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ are treated as Emacs regular expressions.
@section HOME Directory on MS-Windows
@cindex @code{HOME} directory on MS-Windows
The MS-Windows equivalent of the @code{HOME} directory is the
The Windows equivalent of the @code{HOME} directory is the
@dfn{user-specific application data directory}. The actual location
depends on your Windows version and system configuration; typical values
are @file{C:\Documents and Settings\@var{username}\Application Data} on
......
......@@ -545,7 +545,7 @@ shows that information in addition to the other information about the
character.
@findex list-input-methods
To display a list of all the supported input methods, type @kbd{M-x
To see a list of all the supported input methods, type @kbd{M-x
list-input-methods}. The list gives information about each input
method, including the string that stands for it in the mode line.
......
......@@ -1623,11 +1623,11 @@ needs a binding to be useful. The following code will bind it to
@kbd{C-j}. We use @code{c-initialization-hook} here to make sure
the keymap is loaded before we try to change it.
@example
@smallexample
(defun my-bind-clb ()
(define-key c-mode-base-map "\C-j" 'c-context-line-break))
(add-hook 'c-initialization-hook 'my-bind-clb)
@end example
@end smallexample
@item C-M-h
Put mark at the end of a function definition, and put point at the
......
......@@ -1196,10 +1196,10 @@ invoke @command{b2m} like this:
encoded in a simple code called @dfn{rot13}---so named because it
rotates the alphabet by 13 letters. This code is not for secrecy, as it
provides none; rather, it enables those who might be offended to avoid
ever seeing the real text of the message.
seeing the real text of the message.
@findex rot13-other-window
To view a buffer using the rot13 code, use the command @kbd{M-x
To view a buffer which uses the rot13 code, use the command @kbd{M-x
rot13-other-window}. This displays the current buffer in another window
which applies the code when displaying the text.
......@@ -1213,7 +1213,7 @@ versions of @code{movemail} program: the native one, shipped with GNU
Emacs (the ``emacs version'') and the one included in GNU mailutils
(the ``mailutils version,'' @pxref{movemail,,,mailutils,GNU
mailutils}). They support the same command line syntax and the same
basic subset of options. However, the @samp{mailutils} version offers
basic subset of options. However, the Mailutils version offers
additional features.
The Emacs version of @code{movemail} is able to retrieve mail from
......@@ -1317,8 +1317,8 @@ movemail} can work with POP if you compile it with the macro
@samp{--with-pop} when you run @code{configure} during the
installation of Emacs.)
The @code{Mailutils movemail} by default supports POP, unless configured
with @samp{--disable-pop} option.
The Mailutils @code{movemail} by default supports POP, unless it was
configured with @samp{--disable-pop} option.
Both versions of @code{movemail} only work with POP3, not with older
versions of POP.
......@@ -1337,18 +1337,19 @@ case, @var{password} takes preference over the one set by
@code{rmail-remote-password}. This is especially useful if you have
several remote mailboxes with different passwords.
For backward compatibility Rmail also supports two alternative ways
of specifying remote POP mailboxes. Specifying inbox name in the form
@samp{po:@var{username}:@var{hostname}} is equivalent to
@samp{pop://@var{username}@@@var{hostname}}. Alternatively, you may set
a ``file name'' of @samp{po:@var{username}} in the inbox list of an
Rmail file. @code{Movemail} will handle such a name by opening a
connection to the POP server. The @env{MAILHOST} environment variable
will in this case specify the machine to look for the server on.
For backward compatibility, Rmail also supports two alternative ways
of specifying remote POP mailboxes. First, specifying an inbox name
in the form @samp{po:@var{username}:@var{hostname}} is equivalent to
@samp{pop://@var{username}@@@var{hostname}}. Alternatively, you may
set a ``file name'' of @samp{po:@var{username}} in the inbox list of
an Rmail file. @code{movemail} will handle such a name by opening a
connection to the POP server. In this case, the @env{MAILHOST}
environment variable specifies the machine on which to look for the
POP server.
@cindex IMAP mailboxes
Another method for accessing remote mailboxes is IMAP. This method is
supported only by the @code{mailutils movemail}. To specify an IMAP
supported only by the Mailutils {movemail}. To specify an IMAP
mailbox in the inbox list, use the following mailbox @acronym{URL}:
@samp{imap://@var{username}[:@var{password}]@@@var{hostname}}. The
@var{password} part is optional, as described above.
......@@ -1399,19 +1400,18 @@ downloaded messages by adding the @samp{-r} flag to
@code{rmail-movemail-flags}.
@cindex TLS encryption (Rmail)
@code{Mailutils movemail} supports TLS encryption. If you wish to
Mailutils {movemail} supports TLS encryption. If you wish to
use it, add the @samp{--tls} flag to @code{rmail-movemail-flags}.
@node Other Mailbox Formats
@section Retrieving Mail from Local Mailboxes in Various Formats
If your incoming mail is stored on a local machine in a format other
than UNIX mailbox, you will need the @code{mailutils movemail} to retrieve
it. @xref{Movemail}, for the detailed description of @code{movemail}
versions.
For example, to retrieve mail from a @code{maildir} inbox located in
@file{/var/spool/mail/in}, you would set the following in Rmail inbox list:
than UNIX mailbox, you will need the Mailutils @code{movemail} to
retrieve it. @xref{Movemail}, for the detailed description of
@code{movemail} versions. For example, to access mail from a inbox in
@code{maildir} format located in @file{/var/spool/mail/in}, you would
include the following in the Rmail inbox list:
@smallexample
maildir://var/spool/mail/in
......
......@@ -301,8 +301,8 @@ alias chief-torturer "George W. Bush <bush@@whitehouse.gov>"
@end example
@noindent
is correct. Emacs will insert the address as @samp{"George W. Bush"
<bush@@whitehouse.gov>}.
is correct in @samp{.mailrc}. Emacs will insert the address as
@samp{"George W. Bush" <bush@@whitehouse.gov>}.
Emacs also recognizes ``include'' commands in @samp{.mailrc} files.
They look like this:
......@@ -377,11 +377,11 @@ expansion as well. Here's how to do that:
@smallexample
(add-hook 'mail-mode-hook
(lambda ()
(define-key
mail-mode-map [remap next-line] 'mail-abbrev-next-line)
(define-key
mail-mode-map [remap end-of-buffer] 'mail-abbrev-end-of-buffer)))
(lambda ()
(define-key
mail-mode-map [remap next-line] 'mail-abbrev-next-line)
(define-key
mail-mode-map [remap end-of-buffer] 'mail-abbrev-end-of-buffer)))
@end smallexample
@node Mail Mode
......
......@@ -2172,7 +2172,7 @@ color menu for the duration of the Emacs session.
@findex facemenu-set-foreground
@findex facemenu-set-background
There are no key bindings for specifying colors, but you can do so
There are no predefined key bindings for specifying colors, but you can do so
with the extended commands @kbd{M-x facemenu-set-foreground} and
@kbd{M-x facemenu-set-background}. Both of these commands read the name
of the color with the minibuffer.
......@@ -2772,8 +2772,8 @@ following three paragraphs (the latter two are indented with header
lines):
@example
@samp{table-capture} is a powerful command however mastering its power
requires some practice. Here are some things it can do:
@samp{table-capture} is a powerful command, but mastering its
power requires some practice. Here are some things it can do:
Parse Cell Items By using column delimiter regular
expression and raw delimiter regular
......@@ -2797,7 +2797,7 @@ following one.
@c The first line's right-hand frame in the following two examples
@c sticks out to accommodate for the removal of @samp in the
@c produced output!!
@example
@smallexample
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
|@samp{table-capture} is a powerful command, but mastering its |
|power requires some practice. Here are some things it can do: |
......@@ -2814,14 +2814,14 @@ following one.
| the specified region is placed in that |
| cell. |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
By splitting the cell appropriately we now have a table consisting of
paragraphs occupying its own cell. Each cell can now be edited
independently without affecting the layout of other cells.
@example
@smallexample
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
|@samp{table-capture} is a powerful command, but mastering its |
|power requires some practice. Here are some things it can do: |
......@@ -2838,7 +2838,7 @@ independently without affecting the layout of other cells.
| |the specified region is placed in that |
| |cell. |
+---------------------+-------------------------------------------+
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
By applying @code{table-release}, which does the opposite process, the
......
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