Commit 47187200 authored by Michael Witten's avatar Michael Witten Committed by Stefan Monnier
Browse files

* doc/lispref/intro.texi (Evaluation Notation, A Sample Function Description)

(A Sample Variable Description, Version Info): Copy edits.

Fixes: debbugs:11862
parent 4e71fd89
2012-07-05 Michael Witten <mfwitten@gmail.com> (tiny change)
* intro.texi (Evaluation Notation, A Sample Function Description)
(A Sample Variable Description, Version Info): Copy edits (bug#11862).
2012-06-27 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* processes.texi (Asynchronous Processes, Input to Processes):
......
......@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ evaluation of the expanded form.
@result{} c
@end example
Sometimes to help describe one form we show another form that
Sometimes to help describe one form, we show another form that
produces identical results. The exact equivalence of two forms is
indicated with @samp{@equiv{}}.
......@@ -350,8 +350,8 @@ arguments default to @code{nil}). Do not write @code{&optional} when
you call the function.
The keyword @code{&rest} (which must be followed by a single
argument name) indicates that any number of arguments can follow. The
single argument name following @code{&rest} will receive, as its
argument name) indicates that any number of arguments may follow. The
single argument name following @code{&rest} receives, as its
value, a list of all the remaining arguments passed to the function.
Do not write @code{&rest} when you call the function.
......@@ -380,17 +380,18 @@ More generally,
@end defun
Any argument whose name contains the name of a type (e.g.,
@var{integer}, @var{integer1} or @var{buffer}) is expected to be of that
type. A plural of a type (such as @var{buffers}) often means a list of
objects of that type. Arguments named @var{object} may be of any type.
(@xref{Lisp Data Types}, for a list of Emacs object types.) Arguments
with other sorts of names (e.g., @var{new-file}) are discussed
@var{integer}, @var{integer1} or @var{buffer}) is expected to be bound
to an object of that type. A plural of a type (such as @var{buffers})
often means a list of objects of that type. An argument named with the
type @var{object} may be bound to an object of any type.
(@xref{Lisp Data Types} for a list of Emacs object types.) An argument
with some other sort of name (e.g., @var{new-file}) is discussed
specifically in the description of the function. In some sections,
features common to the arguments of several functions are described at
the beginning.
@xref{Lambda Expressions}, for a more complete description of optional
and rest arguments.
@xref{Lambda Expressions} for a more complete description of arguments
modified by @code{&optional} and @code{&rest}.
Command, macro, and special form descriptions have the same format,
but the word `Function' is replaced by `Command', `Macro', or `Special
......@@ -445,11 +446,14 @@ from @var{body}, which includes all remaining elements of the form.
@cindex variable descriptions
@cindex option descriptions
A @dfn{variable} is a name that can hold a value. Although nearly
all variables can be set by the user, certain variables exist
specifically so that users can change them; these are called @dfn{user
options}. Ordinary variables and user options are described using a
format like that for functions except that there are no arguments.
A @dfn{variable} is a name that can be bound to an object; binding
is frequently referred to as `setting', and the object to which
a variable is `set' is often called a `value' that the variable
`holds'. Although nearly all variables can be set by the user,
certain variables exist specifically so that users can change them;
these are called @dfn{user options}. Ordinary variables and user
options are described using a format like that for functions, except
that there are no arguments.
Here is a description of the imaginary @code{electric-future-map}
variable.@refill
......@@ -504,7 +508,7 @@ emacs-build-time
The value of this variable is the version of Emacs being run. It is a
string such as @code{"23.1.1"}. The last number in this string is not
really part of the Emacs release version number; it is incremented
each time you build Emacs in any given directory. A value with four
each time Emacs is built in any given directory. A value with four
numeric components, such as @code{"22.0.91.1"}, indicates an
unreleased test version.
@end defvar
......
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