Commit 4a10556b authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(File Names): Clarify.

(Visiting): Update conditions for use of file dialog.  Clarify.
(Saving): Doc d as answer in save-some-buffers.
(Remote Files): Clean up the text.
parent b027df6b
......@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@ is not defined).
only when done before Emacs is started.
@cindex home directory shorthand
You can use the @file{~/} in a file name to mean your home directory,
You can use @file{~/} in a file name to mean your home directory,
or @file{~@var{user-id}/} to mean the home directory of a user whose
login name is @code{user-id}. (On DOS and Windows systems, where a user
doesn't have a home directory, Emacs substitutes @file{~/} with the
......@@ -208,11 +208,13 @@ While in the minibuffer, you can abort @kbd{C-x C-f} by typing
about this, see @ref{Completion Options}.
@cindex file selection dialog
When Emacs is built with a suitable GUI toolkit, it pops up the
standard File Selection dialog of that toolkit instead of prompting for
the file name in the minibuffer. On Unix and GNU/Linux platforms, Emacs
does that when built with LessTif and Motif toolkits; on MS-Windows, the
GUI version does that by default.
When Emacs is built with a suitable GUI toolkit, commands invoked
with the mouse or the menu bar use the toolkit's standard File
Selection dialog instead of prompting for the file name in the
minibuffer. On Unix and GNU/Linux platforms, Emacs does that when
built with GTK, LessTif, and Motif toolkits; on MS-Windows, the GUI
version does that by default. @xref{Dialog Boxes}, for info
on customization of this.
Your confirmation that @kbd{C-x C-f} has completed successfully is the
appearance of new text on the screen and a new buffer name in the mode
......@@ -253,10 +255,10 @@ carriage-return linefeed or just carriage-return if appropriate.
@vindex find-file-run-dired
If the file you specify is actually a directory, @kbd{C-x C-f} invokes
Dired, the Emacs directory browser, so that you can ``edit'' the contents
of the directory (@pxref{Dired}). Dired is a convenient way to delete,
look at, or operate on the files in the directory. However, if the
variable @code{find-file-run-dired} is @code{nil}, then it is an error
to try to visit a directory.
of the directory (@pxref{Dired}). Dired is a convenient way to view, delete,
or operate on the files in the directory. However, if the variable
@code{find-file-run-dired} is @code{nil}, then it is an error to try
to visit a directory.
Files which are actually collections of other files, or @dfn{file
archives}, are visited in special modes which invoke a Dired-like
......@@ -407,6 +409,9 @@ about other buffers.
View the buffer that you are currently being asked about. When you exit
View mode, you get back to @code{save-some-buffers}, which asks the
question again.
@item d
Diff the buffer against its corresponding file, so you can see
what changes you would be saving.
@item C-h
Display a help message about these options.
@end table
......@@ -3085,26 +3090,24 @@ syntax:
@end example
@noindent
When you do this, Emacs may use the FTP program to access files on the
remote host, or Emacs may use a remote-login program (such as
@command{ssh}, @command{rlogin}, or @command{telnet}) to do this.
You can always specify in the file name which method should be used to
access the remote files, for example
To carry out this request, Emacs uses either the FTP program or a
remote-login program such as @command{ssh}, @command{rlogin}, or
@command{telnet}. You can always specify in the file name which
method to use---for example,
@file{/ftp:@var{user}@@@var{host}:@var{filename}} uses FTP, whereas
@file{/ssh:@var{user}@@@var{host}:@var{filename}} uses @command{ssh}.
When you don't specify a method in the file name, Emacs determines a
default method according to the following rules:
When you don't specify a method in the file name, Emacs chooses
the method as follows:
@enumerate
@item
If the host name starts with @samp{ftp.} (with dot), then Emacs assumes
the @command{ftp} method.
If the host name starts with @samp{ftp.} (with dot), then Emacs uses
FTP.
@item
If the user name is @samp{ftp} or @samp{anonymous}, then Emacs assumes
the @command{ftp} method.
If the user name is @samp{ftp} or @samp{anonymous}, then Emacs uses
FTP.
@item
Otherwise, Emacs assumes the @command{ssh} method.
Otherwise, Emacs uses @command{ssh}.
@end enumerate
@noindent
......
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