Commit 4bb49b43 authored by Jay Belanger's avatar Jay Belanger
Browse files

(History and Acknowledgements): Turn comment about integer size into

past tense.
(Time Zones): Remove pointer to Calc author's address.
(Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions): Mention cotangent and
hyperbolic cotangent functions.
parent a7192ddb
2007-10-20 Jay Belanger <jay.p.belanger@gmail.com>
* calc.texi (History and Acknowledgements): Turn comment
about integer size into past tense.
(Time Zones): Remove pointer to Calc author's address.
(Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions): Mention cotangent
and hyperbolic cotangent.
2007-10-10 Michael Albinus <michael.albinus@gmx.de>
Sync with Tramp 2.1.11.
......
......@@ -1156,16 +1156,16 @@ solid implementation of Lisp, and the humble task of calculating
turned out to be more open-ended than one might have expected.
 
Emacs Lisp didn't have built-in floating point math (now it does), so
this had to be
simulated in software. In fact, Emacs integers will only comfortably
fit six decimal digits or so---not enough for a decent calculator. So
I had to write my own high-precision integer code as well, and once I had
this I figured that arbitrary-size integers were just as easy as large
integers. Arbitrary floating-point precision was the logical next step.
Also, since the large integer arithmetic was there anyway it seemed only
fair to give the user direct access to it, which in turn made it practical
to support fractions as well as floats. All these features inspired me
to look around for other data types that might be worth having.
this had to be simulated in software. In fact, Emacs integers would
only comfortably fit six decimal digits or so---not enough for a decent
calculator. So I had to write my own high-precision integer code as
well, and once I had this I figured that arbitrary-size integers were
just as easy as large integers. Arbitrary floating-point precision was
the logical next step. Also, since the large integer arithmetic was
there anyway it seemed only fair to give the user direct access to it,
which in turn made it practical to support fractions as well as floats.
All these features inspired me to look around for other data types that
might be worth having.
 
Around this time, my friend Rick Koshi showed me his nifty new HP-28
calculator. It allowed the user to manipulate formulas as well as
......@@ -17255,11 +17255,6 @@ daylight saving time (e.g., @code{PDT} or @code{PST}) the
the algorithms described above are used. If @var{zone} is omitted,
the computation is done for the current time zone.
 
@xref{Reporting Bugs}, for the address of Calc's author, if you
should wish to contribute your improved versions of
@code{math-tzone-names} and @code{math-daylight-savings-hook}
to the Calc distribution.
@node Financial Functions, Binary Functions, Date Arithmetic, Arithmetic
@section Financial Functions
 
......@@ -18325,11 +18320,11 @@ vector as an argument and computes @code{arctan2} of the elements.
@pindex calc-coth
@tindex coth
The remaining trigonometric functions, @code{calc-sec} [@code{sec}],
@code{calc-csc} [@code{csc}] and @code{calc-sec} [@code{sec}], are also
@code{calc-csc} [@code{csc}] and @code{calc-cot} [@code{cot}], are also
available. With the Hyperbolic flag, these compute their hyperbolic
counterparts, which are also available separately as @code{calc-sech}
[@code{sech}], @code{calc-csch} [@code{csch}] and @code{calc-sech}
[@code{sech}]. (These commmands do not accept the Inverse flag.)
[@code{sech}], @code{calc-csch} [@code{csch}] and @code{calc-coth}
[@code{coth}]. (These commmands do not accept the Inverse flag.)
 
@node Advanced Math Functions, Branch Cuts, Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions, Scientific Functions
@section Advanced Mathematical Functions
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment