Commit 4dc5fe62 authored by Romain Francoise's avatar Romain Francoise
Browse files

* cc-mode.texi (Getting Started, Indentation Commands, Config Basics)

(Custom Filling and Breaking, Custom Braces, Syntactic Symbols)
(Line-Up Functions, Custom Macros):
* ediff.texi (Window and Frame Configuration)
(Highlighting Difference Regions, Highlighting Difference Regions):
* emacs-mime.texi (Display Customization):
* erc.texi (History):
* eshell.texi (Known problems):
* eudc.texi (Overview, BBDB):
* gnus.texi (NNTP, IMAP, Advanced Scoring Examples)
(The problem of spam, SpamOracle, Extending the Spam package)
(Conformity, Terminology):
* idlwave.texi (Routine Info, Routine Info)
(Class and Keyword Inheritance, Padding Operators)
(Breakpoints and Stepping, Electric Debug Mode)
(Examining Variables, Troubleshooting):
* org.texi (Creating timestamps):
* reftex.texi (Commands, Options, Changes):
* tramp.texi (Inline methods, Password caching)
(Auto-save and Backup, Issues):
* vip.texi (Files, Commands in Insert Mode):
* viper.texi (Emacs Preliminaries, States in Viper)
(Packages that Change Keymaps, Viper Specials, Groundwork):
* xresmini.texi (GTK resources):
Fix various typos.
parent 55d5a463
2006-06-05 Romain Francoise <romain@orebokech.com>
* cc-mode.texi (Getting Started, Indentation Commands, Config Basics)
(Custom Filling and Breaking, Custom Braces, Syntactic Symbols)
(Line-Up Functions, Custom Macros):
* ediff.texi (Window and Frame Configuration)
(Highlighting Difference Regions, Highlighting Difference Regions):
* emacs-mime.texi (Display Customization):
* erc.texi (History):
* eshell.texi (Known problems):
* eudc.texi (Overview, BBDB):
* gnus.texi (NNTP, IMAP, Advanced Scoring Examples)
(The problem of spam, SpamOracle, Extending the Spam package)
(Conformity, Terminology):
* idlwave.texi (Routine Info, Routine Info)
(Class and Keyword Inheritance, Padding Operators)
(Breakpoints and Stepping, Electric Debug Mode)
(Examining Variables, Troubleshooting):
* org.texi (Creating timestamps):
* reftex.texi (Commands, Options, Changes):
* tramp.texi (Inline methods, Password caching)
(Auto-save and Backup, Issues):
* vip.texi (Files, Commands in Insert Mode):
* viper.texi (Emacs Preliminaries, States in Viper)
(Packages that Change Keymaps, Viper Specials, Groundwork):
* xresmini.texi (GTK resources):
Fix various typos.
2006-06-05 Nick Roberts <nickrob@snap.net.nz>
* building.texi (GDB Graphical Interface): Update bindings.
......@@ -688,7 +716,7 @@
* custom.texi: Many cleanups.
(Minor Modes): Don't mention ISO Accents Mode.
(Examining): Update C-h v output example.
(Hooks): Add index and xref for add-hook.
(Hooks): Add index and xref for add-hook.
(Locals): Delete list of vars that are always per-buffer. Rearrange.
(Local Keymaps): Don't mention lisp-mode-map, c-mode-map.
......
......@@ -208,7 +208,7 @@ license to the document, as described in section 6 of the license.
@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
@insertcopying
This manual was generated from $Revision: 1.36 $ of $RCSfile: cc-mode.texi,v $, which can be
This manual was generated from $Revision$ of $RCSfile$, which can be
downloaded from
@url{http://cvs.savannah.gnu.org/viewcvs/emacs/emacs/man/cc-mode.texi}.
@end titlepage
......@@ -507,7 +507,7 @@ indents nested code. To set this value to 6, customize
@item The (indentation) style
The basic ``shape'' of indentation created by @ccmode{}---by default,
this is @code{gnu} style (except for Java and AWK buffers). A list of
the availables styles and their descriptions can be found in
the available styles and their descriptions can be found in
@ref{Built-in Styles}. A complete specification of the @ccmode{}
style system, including how to create your own style, can be found in
the chapter @ref{Styles}. To set your style to @code{linux}, either
......@@ -672,7 +672,7 @@ This command indents the current line. That is all you need to know
about it for normal use.
@code{c-indent-command} does different things, depending on the
settting of @code{c-syntactic-indentation} (@pxref{Indentation Engine
setting of @code{c-syntactic-indentation} (@pxref{Indentation Engine
Basics}):
@itemize @bullet
......@@ -2128,7 +2128,7 @@ escaped newline. The @samp{\} is highlighted.
@chapter Configuration Basics
@comment !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
@cindex Emacs Initiliazation File
@cindex Emacs Initialization File
@cindex Configuration
You configure @ccmode{} by setting Lisp variables and calling (and
perhaps writing) Lisp functions@footnote{DON'T PANIC!!! This isn't
......@@ -2914,7 +2914,7 @@ variable@footnote{In versions before 5.26, this variable was called
@ccmode{} still uses the value on that variable if it's set.} is used
then as the comment prefix. It defaults to @samp{*
}@footnote{Actually, this default setting of
@code{c-block-comment-prefix} typically gets overriden by the default
@code{c-block-comment-prefix} typically gets overridden by the default
style @code{gnu}, which sets it to blank. You can see the line
splitting effect described here by setting a different style,
e.g. @code{k&r} @xref{Choosing a Style}.}, which makes a comment
......@@ -3209,7 +3209,7 @@ Syntactic symbols aren't the only place where you can customize
that @var{action}s are usually a list containing some combination of
the symbols @code{before} and @code{after} (@pxref{Hanging Braces}).
For more flexibility, you can instead specify brace ``hanginess'' by
giving a synctactic symbol an @dfn{action function} in
giving a syntactic symbol an @dfn{action function} in
@code{c-hanging-braces-alist}; this function determines the
``hanginess'' of a brace, usually by looking at the code near it.
......@@ -4024,7 +4024,7 @@ The line is nested inside a class definition. @ref{Class Symbols}.
@item cpp-macro
The start of a preprocessor macro definition. @ref{Literal Symbols}.
@item cpp-define-intro
The first line inside a multiline preproprocessor macro if
The first line inside a multiline preprocessor macro if
@code{c-syntactic-indentation-in-macros} is set. @ref{Multiline Macro
Symbols}.
@item cpp-macro-cont
......@@ -5311,7 +5311,7 @@ meaning ``this function is inappropriate in this case - try a
different one''. @xref{c-offsets-alist}.
The subsections below describe all the standard line-up functions,
categorized by the sort of token the lining-up centres around. For
categorized by the sort of token the lining-up centers around. For
each of these functions there is a ``works with'' list that indicates
which syntactic symbols the function is intended to be used with.
......@@ -6433,7 +6433,7 @@ functions to this hook, not remove them. @xref{Style Variables}.
@comment !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Normally, the lines in a multi-line macro are indented relative to
eachother as though they were code. You can suppress this behaviour
each other as though they were code. You can suppress this behaviour
by setting the following user option:
@defopt c-syntactic-indentation-in-macros
......
......@@ -1455,7 +1455,7 @@ the control frame.
To start Ediff with an iconified Control Panel, you should set this
variable to @code{t} and @code{ediff-prefer-long-help-message} to
@code{nil} (@pxref{Quick Help Customization}). This behavior is useful
only if icons are allowed to accept keybord input (which depend on the
only if icons are allowed to accept keyboard input (which depends on the
window manager and other factors).
@end table
......@@ -1680,7 +1680,7 @@ Ediff uses faces to highlight differences.
@item ediff-highlight-all-diffs
@vindex ediff-highlight-all-diffs
Indicates whether---on a windowind display---Ediff should highlight
Indicates whether---on a windowing display---Ediff should highlight
differences using inserted strings (as on text-only terminals) or using
colors and highlighting. Normally, Ediff highlights all differences, but
the selected difference is highlighted more visibly. One can cycle through
......@@ -1719,7 +1719,7 @@ some Lisp code in @file{~/.emacs}. For instance,
@end example
@noindent
would use the pre-defined fase @code{bold-italic} to highlight the current
would use the pre-defined face @code{bold-italic} to highlight the current
difference region in buffer A (this face is not a good choice, by the way).
If you are unhappy with just @emph{some} of the aspects of the default
......
......@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ you could say something like:
@end lisp
Adding @code{"image/.*"} might also be useful. Spammers use images as
the prefered part of @samp{multipart/alternative} messages, so you might
the preferred part of @samp{multipart/alternative} messages, so you might
not notice there are other parts. See also
@code{gnus-buttonized-mime-types}, @ref{MIME Commands, ,MIME Commands,
gnus, Gnus Manual}. After adding @code{"multipart/alternative"} to
......
......@@ -561,7 +561,7 @@ questions.
ERC was originally written by Alexander L. Belikoff
@email{abel@@bfr.co.il} and Sergey Berezin
@email{sergey.berezin@@cs.cmu.edu}. They stopped development around
december 1999. Their last released version was ERC 2.0.
December 1999. Their last released version was ERC 2.0.
P.S.: If one of the original developers of ERC reads this, we'd like to
receive additional information for this file and hear comments in
......@@ -580,12 +580,12 @@ there. The thing is, I do not have free time and enough incentive
anymore to work on ERC, so I would be happy if you guys take over the
project entirely."
So we happily hacked away on ERC, and soon after (september 2001)
So we happily hacked away on ERC, and soon after (September 2001)
released the next "stable" version, 2.1.
Most of the development of the new ERC happend on #emacs on
Most of the development of the new ERC happened on #emacs on
irc.openprojects.net. Over time, many people contributed code, ideas,
bugfixes. And not to forget alot of alpha/beta/gamma testing.
bugfixes. And not to forget a lot of alpha/beta/gamma testing.
See the @file{CREDITS} file for a list of contributors.
......
......@@ -848,7 +848,7 @@ a file in the Windows Explorer).
It would move point to the end of the buffer, and then turns on
auto-revert mode in that buffer at frequent intervals---and a
@command{head} alias which assums an upper limit of
@command{head} alias which assumes an upper limit of
@code{eshell-maximum-line-length} characters per line.
@item Make @command{dgrep} load @code{dired}, mark everything, then invoke @code{dired-do-search}
......
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ LDAP, Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
@item
CCSO PH/QI
@item
BBDB, Big Brother's Insiduous Database
BBDB, Big Brother's Insidious Database
@end itemize
The main features of the EUDC interface are:
......@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ EUDC.
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
@section BBDB
BBDB is the @dfn{Big Brother's Insiduous Database}, a package for Emacs
BBDB is the @dfn{Big Brother's Insidious Database}, a package for Emacs
originally written by Jamie Zawinski which provides rolodex-like
database functionality featuring tight integration with the Emacs mail
and news readers.
......
......@@ -12660,8 +12660,8 @@ server:
@vindex nntp-server-opened-hook
@cindex @sc{mode reader}
@cindex authinfo
@cindex authentification
@cindex nntp authentification
@cindex authentication
@cindex nntp authentication
@findex nntp-send-authinfo
@findex nntp-send-mode-reader
is run after a connection has been made. It can be used to send
......@@ -16397,7 +16397,7 @@ articles stand out, just like ticked articles, in other @acronym{IMAP}
clients. (In other words, Gnus has two ``Tick'' marks and @acronym{IMAP}
has only one.)
Probably the only reason for frobing this would be if you're trying
Probably the only reason for frobbing this would be if you're trying
enable per-user persistent dormant flags, using something like:
@lisp
......@@ -20635,7 +20635,7 @@ really don't want to read what he's written:
@example
((&
("from" "Lars Ingebrigtsen")
(1- ("from" "Reig Eigir Logge")))
(1- ("from" "Reig Eigil Logge")))
-100000)
@end example
......@@ -22569,7 +22569,7 @@ words or 3-word combinations thrown into the mix. Statistical
analysis of spam works very well in most of the cases, but it can
classify legitimate e-mail as spam in some cases. It takes time to
run the analysis, the full message must be analyzed, and the user has
to store the database of spam analyses. Statistical analysis on the
to store the database of spam analysis. Statistical analysis on the
server is gaining popularity. This has the advantage of letting the
user Just Read Mail, but has the disadvantage that it's harder to tell
the server that it has misclassified mail.
......@@ -23972,7 +23972,7 @@ can be customized.
@defvar spam-spamoracle-database
By default, SpamOracle uses the file @file{~/.spamoracle.db} as a database to
store its analyses. This is controlled by the variable
store its analysis. This is controlled by the variable
@code{spam-spamoracle-database} which defaults to @code{nil}. That means
the default SpamOracle database will be used. In case you want your
database to live somewhere special, set
......@@ -24080,7 +24080,7 @@ Add
to @code{spam-registration-functions}. Write the register/unregister
routines using the bogofilter register/unregister routines as a
start, or other restister/unregister routines more appropriate to
start, or other register/unregister routines more appropriate to
Blackbox.
@item
......@@ -24877,7 +24877,7 @@ decryption).
@item PGP/MIME - RFC 2015/3156
RFC 2015 (superseded by 3156 which references RFC 2440 instead of RFC
1991) describes the @acronym{MIME}-wrapping around the RF 1991/2440 format.
1991) describes the @acronym{MIME}-wrapping around the RFC 1991/2440 format.
Gnus supports both encoding and decoding.
@item S/MIME - RFC 2633
......@@ -26977,7 +26977,7 @@ A collection of messages in one file. The most common digest format is
specified by RFC 1153.
@item splitting
@cindex splitting, terminolgy
@cindex splitting, terminology
@cindex mail sorting
@cindex mail filtering (splitting)
The action of sorting your emails according to certain rules. Sometimes
......
......@@ -1133,7 +1133,7 @@ When you ask for routine information about an object method, and the
method exists in several classes, IDLWAVE queries for the class of the
object, unless the class is already known through a text property on the
@samp{->} operator (@pxref{Object Method Completion and Class
Ambiguity}), or by having been explicity included in the call
Ambiguity}), or by having been explicitly included in the call
(e.g. @code{a->myclass::Foo}).
@cindex Calling sequences
......@@ -1185,7 +1185,7 @@ will automatically split into the next two.
@item @i{Other}
@tab Any other routine with a file not known to be on the search path.
@item @i{Unresolved}
@tab An otherwise unkown routine the shell lists as unresolved
@tab An otherwise unknown routine the shell lists as unresolved
(referenced, but not compiled).
@end multitable
......@@ -1779,12 +1779,12 @@ entire class inheritance chain. This is often referred to as
@emph{chaining}, and is characterized by chained method calls like
@w{@code{self->MySuperClass::SetProperty,_EXTRA=e}}.
IDLWAVE can accomodate this special synergy between class and keyword
IDLWAVE can accommodate this special synergy between class and keyword
inheritance: if @code{_EXTRA} or @code{_REF_EXTRA} is detected among a
method's keyword parameters, all keywords of superclass versions of
the method being considered can be included in completion. There is
of course no guarantee that this type of keyword chaining actually
occurrs, but for some methods it's a very convenient assumption. The
occurs, but for some methods it's a very convenient assumption. The
variable @code{idlwave-keyword-class-inheritance} can be used to
configure which methods have keyword inheritance treated in this
simple, class-driven way. By default, only @code{Init} and
......@@ -2207,7 +2207,7 @@ operators (outside of strings and comments, of course), try this in
Note that the modified assignment operators which begin with a word
(@samp{AND=}, @samp{OR=}, @samp{NOT=}, etc.) require a leading space to
be recognized (e.g @code{vAND=4} would be intepreted as a variable
be recognized (e.g @code{vAND=4} would be interpreted as a variable
@code{vAND}). Also note that, since e.g., @code{>} and @code{>=} are
both valid operators, it is impossible to surround both by blanks while
they are being typed. Similarly with @code{&} and @code{&&}. For
......@@ -2811,7 +2811,7 @@ prefix arg of 1 (i.e. @kbd{C-1 C-c C-d C-b}), the breakpoint gets a
With a numeric prefix greater than one (e.g. @kbd{C-4 C-c C-d C-b}),
the breakpoint will only be active the @code{nth} time it is hit.
With a single non-numeric prefix (i.e. @kbd{C-u C-c C-d C-b}), prompt
for a condition --- an IDL expression to be evaulated and trigger the
for a condition --- an IDL expression to be evaluated and trigger the
breakpoint only if true. To clear the breakpoint in the current line,
use @kbd{C-c C-d C-d} (@code{idlwave-clear-current-bp}). When
executed from the shell window, the breakpoint where IDL is currently
......@@ -3068,7 +3068,7 @@ as it did with @kbd{C-u C-c C-d C-b}.
You can toggle the electric debug mode at any time in a buffer using
@kbd{C-c C-d C-v} (@kbd{v} to turn it off while in the mode), or from
the Debug menu. Normally the mode will be enabled and disabled at the
appropriate times, but occassionally you might want to edit a file
appropriate times, but occasionally you might want to edit a file
while still debugging it, or switch to the mode for conveniently
setting lots of breakpoints.
......@@ -3136,7 +3136,7 @@ execution is stopped in a buffer due to a triggered breakpoint or error,
or while composing a long command in the IDLWAVE shell. In the latter
case, the command is sent to the shell and its output is visible, but
point remains unmoved in the command being composed --- you can inspect
the contituents of a command you're building without interrupting the
the constituents of a command you're building without interrupting the
process of building it! You can even print arbitrary expressions from
older input or output further up in the shell window --- any expression,
variable, number, or function you see can be examined.
......@@ -4266,7 +4266,7 @@ some browsers: @xref{HTML Help Browser Tips}.
@item @strong{In the shell, my long commands are truncated at 256 characters!}
This actually happens when running IDL in an XTerm as well. There are
a couple of work arounds: @code{define_key,/control,'^d'} (e.g. in
a couple of workarounds: @code{define_key,/control,'^d'} (e.g. in
your @file{$IDL_STARTUP} file) will disable the @samp{EOF} character
and give you a 512 character limit. You won't be able to use
@key{C-d} to quit the shell, however. Another possibility is
......@@ -4281,7 +4281,7 @@ is loaded is one page off, e.g. for @code{CONVERT_COORD}, I get
You have a mismatch between your help index and the HTML help package
you downloaded. You need to ensure you download a ``downgrade kit'' if
you are using anything older than the latest HTML help package. A new
help package apppears with each IDL release (assuming the documentation
help package appears with each IDL release (assuming the documentation
is updated).
Starting with IDL 6.2, the HTML help and its catalog are
distributed with IDL, and so should never be inconsistent.
......
......@@ -2336,7 +2336,7 @@ into the following column).
When Org-mode prompts for a date/time, the function reading your input
will replace anything you choose not to specify with the current date
and time. For details, see the documentation string of
@command{org-read-date}. Also, a calender will pop up to allow
@command{org-read-date}. Also, a calendar will pop up to allow
selecting a date. The calendar can be fully controlled from the
minibuffer, and a date can be selected with the following commands:
......
......@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ citations and indices for LaTeX documents with Emacs.
This is edition @value{EDITION} of the @b{Ref@TeX{}} User Manual for
@b{Ref@TeX{}} @value{VERSION}
Copyright @copyright{} 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005
Copyright @copyright{} 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006
Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
......@@ -3572,7 +3572,7 @@ expression, scans the buffers with BibTeX entries (taken from the
and offers the matching entries for selection. The selected entry is
formatted according to @code{reftex-cite-format} and inserted into the
buffer. @*
When called with a @kbd{C-u} prefixe, prompt for optional arguments in
When called with a @kbd{C-u} prefix, prompt for optional arguments in
cite macros. When called with a numeric prefix, make that many citations.
When called with point inside the braces of a @code{\cite} command, it
will add another key, ignoring the value of
......@@ -3780,7 +3780,7 @@ Commands and levels used for defining sections in the document. The
@code{cdr} is a number indicating its level. A negative level means the
same as the positive value, but the section will never get a number.
The @code{cdr} may also be a function which then has to return the
level. This list is also used for promotion and demption of sectioning
level. This list is also used for promotion and demotion of sectioning
commands. If you are using a document class which has several sets of
sectioning commands, promotion only works correctly if this list is
sorted first by set, then within each set by level. The promotion
......@@ -5193,7 +5193,7 @@ Fixed bug in @code{reftex-create-bibtex-file} when @code{reftex-comment-citation
is non-nil.
@item
Fixed bugs in indexing: Case-sensitive search, quotes before and/or
after words. Disabbled indexing in comment lines.
after words. Disabled indexing in comment lines.
@end itemize
@noindent @b{Version 4.22}
......
......@@ -698,7 +698,7 @@ remote host.
Additionally, the method @option{plink1} is provided, which calls
@samp{plink -1 -ssh} in order to use SSH protocol version 1
explicitely.
explicitly.
CCC: Do we have to connect to the remote host once from the command
line to accept the SSH key? Maybe this can be made automatic?
......@@ -1261,12 +1261,12 @@ Example:
Sometimes it is necessary to connect to the same remote host several
times. Reentering passwords again and again would be annoying, when
the choosen method does not support access without password prompt
throught own configuration.
the chosen method does not support access without password prompt
through own configuration.
By default, @value{tramp} caches the passwords entered by you. They will
be reused next time if a connection needs them for the same user name
and host name, independant of the connection method.
and host name, independently of the connection method.
@vindex password-cache-expiry
Passwords are not saved permanently, that means the password caching
......@@ -1524,7 +1524,7 @@ When
@end ifset
is @code{nil} (the default), such problems do not occur.
Therefore, it is usefull to set special values for @value{tramp}
Therefore, it is useful to set special values for @value{tramp}
files. For example, the following statement effectively `turns off'
the effect of
@ifset emacs
......@@ -2365,7 +2365,7 @@ installed from the start. If the filenames were unified, @value{tramp}
would have to be installed from the start, too.
@ifset xemacs
@strong{Note:} If you'ld like to use a similar syntax like
@strong{Note:} If you'd like to use a similar syntax like
@value{ftppackagename}, you need the following settings in your init
file:
......
......@@ -914,7 +914,7 @@ Use @kbd{V} instead of @kbd{v}, if you wish to visit a file in another
window.
You can verify which file you are editing by typing @kbd{g}. (You can also
type @kbd{X B} to get nformation on other buffers too.) If you type
type @kbd{X B} to get information on other buffers too.) If you type
@kbd{g} you will get an information like below in the echo area:@refill
@example
"/usr/masahiko/man/vip.texinfo" line 921 of 1949
......@@ -1665,7 +1665,7 @@ Delete previous word (@code{vip-delete-backward-word}).
@item C-z
@kindex 032 @kbd{C-z} (@code{vip-ESC}) (insert mode)
This key simulates @key{ESC} key in emacs mode. For instance, typing
@kbd{C-z x} in insert mode iw the same as typing @kbd{ESC x} in emacs mode
@kbd{C-z x} in insert mode is the same as typing @kbd{ESC x} in emacs mode
(@code{vip-ESC}).
@end table
@noindent
......
......@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ etc.
Furthermore, Viper lets Ex-style commands to work on the current region.
This is done by typing a digit argument before @kbd{:}. For instance,
typing @kbd{1:} will propmt you with something like @emph{:123,135},
typing @kbd{1:} will prompt you with something like @emph{:123,135},
assuming that the current region starts at line 123 and ends at line
135. There is no need to type the line numbers, since Viper inserts them
automatically in front of the Ex command.
......@@ -417,7 +417,7 @@ should start them with a @kbd{:}, e.g., @kbd{:WW}.
In Viper, Ex commands can be made to work on the current Emacs region.
This is done by typing a digit argument before @kbd{:}.
For instance, typing @kbd{1:} will propmt you with something like
For instance, typing @kbd{1:} will prompt you with something like
@emph{:123,135}, assuming that the current region starts at line 123 and
ends at line 135. There is no need to type the line numbers, since Viper
inserts them automatically in front of the Ex command.
......@@ -2292,7 +2292,7 @@ the Shell mode by changing the bindings for @kbd{C-m} and @kbd{C-d} using
(@pxref{Customization}).
In some cases, some @emph{minor} modes might override certain essential
bindings in Vi command state. This is not a big priblem because this
bindings in Vi command state. This is not a big problem because this
can happen only in the beginning, when the minor mode kicks in. Typing
@code{M-x viper-mode} will correct the situation. Viper knows about
several such minor modes and takes care of them, so the above trick
......@@ -2670,7 +2670,7 @@ placing this command in @code{~/.viper}:
(setq viper-mouse-insert-key '(meta 2))
@end lisp
If you want to bind mouse-insert to an action even if this action is
already taked for other purposes in Emacs, then you should add this command
already taken for other purposes in Emacs, then you should add this command
to @code{~/.viper}, after setting @code{viper-mouse-insert-key}:
@lisp
(viper-bind-mouse-insert-key 'force)
......@@ -3236,7 +3236,7 @@ Control character.
Finally, we note that Viper's Ex-style commands can be made to work on the
current Emacs region. This is done by typing a digit argument before
@kbd{:}. For instance, typing @kbd{1:} will propmt you with something like
@kbd{:}. For instance, typing @kbd{1:} will prompt you with something like
@emph{:123,135}, assuming that the current region starts at line 123 and
ends at line 135. There is no need to type the line numbers, since Viper
inserts them automatically in front of the Ex command.
......
......@@ -347,7 +347,7 @@ widget "Emacs.pane.menubar" style "my_style"
widget "Emacs.pane.emacs.verticalScrollBar" style "my_style"
@end smallexample
But to aoid having to type it all, wildcards are often used. @samp{*}
But to avoid having to type it all, wildcards are often used. @samp{*}
matches zero or more characters and @samp{?} matches one character. So "*"
matches all widgets.
......
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