Commit 4eeba558 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

* misc.texi (Terminal emulator): Document Term mode faces.

parent 7d806bfe
2012-11-07 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* misc.texi (Terminal emulator): Document Term mode faces.
* mini.texi (Basic Minibuffer): New node. Document
minibuffer-electric-default-mode.
......
......@@ -1186,30 +1186,39 @@ underlying shell, of course.
@subsection Emacs Terminal Emulator
@findex term
To run a subshell in a terminal emulator, use @kbd{M-x term}. This
creates (or reuses) a buffer named @file{*terminal*}, and runs a
To run a subshell in a text terminal emulator, use @kbd{M-x term}.
This creates (or reuses) a buffer named @file{*terminal*}, and runs a
subshell with input coming from your keyboard, and output going to
that buffer.
@cindex line mode @r{(terminal emulator)}
@cindex char mode @r{(terminal emulator)}
The terminal emulator uses Term mode, which has two input modes. In
line mode, Term basically acts like Shell mode (@pxref{Shell Mode}).
In char mode, each character is sent directly to the subshell, as
``terminal input''. Any ``echoing'' of your input is the
responsibility of the subshell. The sole exception is the terminal
escape character, which by default is @kbd{C-c} (@pxref{Term Mode}).
Any ``terminal output'' from the subshell goes into the buffer,
advancing point.
@dfn{line mode}, Term basically acts like Shell mode (@pxref{Shell
Mode}). In @dfn{char mode}, each character is sent directly to the
subshell, as terminal input; the sole exception is the terminal escape
character, which by default is @kbd{C-c} (@pxref{Term Mode}). Any
echoing of your input is the responsibility of the subshell; any
terminal output from the subshell goes into the buffer, advancing
point.
Some programs (such as Emacs itself) need to control the appearance
on the terminal screen in detail. They do this by sending special
control codes. The exact control codes needed vary from terminal to
terminal, but nowadays most terminals and terminal emulators
(including @code{xterm}) understand the ANSI-standard (VT100-style)
escape sequences. Term mode recognizes these escape sequences, and
handles each one appropriately, changing the buffer so that the
appearance of the window matches what it would be on a real terminal.
You can actually run Emacs inside an Emacs Term window.
of the terminal screen in detail. They do this by emitting special
control codes. Term mode recognizes and handles ANSI-standard
VT100-style escape sequences, which are accepted by most modern
terminals, including @command{xterm}. (Hence, you can actually run
Emacs inside an Emacs Term window.)
The @code{term-face} face specifies the default appearance of text
in the terminal emulator (the default is the same appearance as the
@code{default} face). When terminal control codes are used to change
the appearance of text, these are represented in the terminal emulator
by the faces @code{term-color-black}, @code{term-color-red},
@code{term-color-green}, @code{term-color-yellow}
@code{term-color-blue}, @code{term-color-magenta},
@code{term-color-cyan}, @code{term-color-white},
@code{term-color-underline}, and @code{term-color-bold}.
@xref{Faces}.
You can also Term mode to communicate with a device connected to a
serial port. @xref{Serial Terminal}.
......@@ -1224,6 +1233,9 @@ examining your input. But some shells can tell Term what the current
directory is. This is done automatically by @code{bash} version 1.15
and later.
@node Term Mode
@subsection Term Mode
@cindex Term mode
......
......@@ -583,7 +583,7 @@ that the sql statement will be terminated by a semicolon.
at point, or the Nth column if a numeric prefix argument is given.
** Term
+++
The variables `term-default-fg-color' and `term-default-bg-color' are
now deprecated in favor of the `term-face' face, that you can
customize. Also, it is now possible to customize how are displayed the
......
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