Commit 4f08fb5a authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

Minor quoting etc. fixes to Emacs manual

* doc/emacs/Makefile.in, doc/emacs/ack.texi, doc/emacs/building.texi:
* doc/emacs/calendar.texi, doc/emacs/cmdargs.texi:
* doc/emacs/custom.texi, doc/emacs/dired.texi, doc/emacs/emacs.texi:
* doc/emacs/files.texi, doc/emacs/glossary.texi, doc/emacs/gnu.texi:
* doc/emacs/indent.texi, doc/emacs/macos.texi:
* doc/emacs/maintaining.texi, doc/emacs/makefile.w32-in:
* doc/emacs/programs.texi, doc/emacs/rmail.texi:
* doc/emacs/search.texi, doc/emacs/trouble.texi:
* doc/emacs/vc1-xtra.texi:
Use American-style double quoting in ordinary text,
and quote 'like this' when single-quoting in ASCII text.
Also, fix some minor spacing issues.
parent 31f31a75
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ SHELL = @SHELL@
# update the sed rules in the dist target below.
# Where to find the source code. $(srcdir) will be the doc/emacs subdirectory
# of the source tree. This is set by configure's `--srcdir' option.
# of the source tree. This is set by configure's '--srcdir' option.
srcdir=@srcdir@
top_srcdir = @top_srcdir@
......
......@@ -1201,7 +1201,7 @@ Ken Stevens wrote @file{ispell.el}, a spell-checker interface.
@item
Kim F. Storm made many improvements to the Emacs display engine,
process support, and networking support. He also wrote
process support, and networking support. He also wrote
@file{bindat.el}, a package for encoding and decoding binary data;
CUA mode, which allows Emacs to emulate the standard CUA key
bindings; @file{ido.el}, a package for selecting buffers and files
......
......@@ -947,7 +947,7 @@ of the window. Disabled breakpoints are indicated with @samp{b}.
(The margin is only displayed if a breakpoint is present.)
A solid arrow in the left fringe of a source buffer indicates the
line of the innermost frame where the debugged program has stopped. A
line of the innermost frame where the debugged program has stopped. A
hollow arrow indicates the current execution line of a higher-level
frame. If you drag the arrow in the fringe with @kbd{Mouse-1}, that
causes execution to advance to the line where you release the button.
......@@ -1138,7 +1138,7 @@ size for these data items.
When @code{gdb-many-windows} is non-@code{nil}, the locals buffer
shares its window with the registers buffer, just like breakpoints and
threads buffers. To switch from one to the other, click with
threads buffers. To switch from one to the other, click with
@kbd{Mouse-1} on the relevant button in the header line.
@node Watch Expressions
......@@ -1457,8 +1457,8 @@ Evaluate all the Emacs Lisp expressions in the buffer.
@end table
@ifinfo
@c This uses ``colon'' instead of a literal `:' because Info cannot
@c cope with a `:' in a menu
@c This uses 'colon' instead of a literal ':' because Info cannot
@c cope with a ':' in a menu.
@kindex M-@key{colon}
@end ifinfo
@ifnotinfo
......
......@@ -379,7 +379,7 @@ between years will not work.
If the variable @code{cal-html-print-day-number-flag} is
non-@code{nil}, then the monthly calendars show the day-of-the-year
number. The variable @code{cal-html-year-index-cols} specifies the
number. The variable @code{cal-html-year-index-cols} specifies the
number of columns in the yearly index page.
@cindex calendar and @LaTeX{}
......@@ -827,7 +827,7 @@ Display Mayan date for selected day (@code{calendar-mayan-print-date}).
Otherwise, move point to the date you want to convert, then type the
appropriate command starting with @kbd{p} from the table above. The
prefix @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print'', since Emacs ``prints'' the
equivalent date in the echo area. @kbd{p o} displays the
equivalent date in the echo area. @kbd{p o} displays the
date in all forms known to Emacs. You can also use @kbd{Mouse-3} and
then choose @kbd{Other calendars} from the menu that appears. This
displays the equivalent forms of the date in all the calendars Emacs
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
@cindex switches (command line)
@cindex startup (command line arguments)
@cindex invocation (command line arguments)
@c FIXME: Document `--smid'? --xfq
@c FIXME: Document '--smid'? --xfq
Emacs supports command line arguments to request various actions
when invoking Emacs. These are for compatibility with other editors
......@@ -582,7 +582,7 @@ The name of the news server. Used by the mh and Gnus packages.
@item ORGANIZATION
@vindex ORGANIZATION, environment variable
The name of the organization to which you belong. Used for setting the
`Organization:' header in your posts from the Gnus package.
``Organization:'' header in your posts from the Gnus package.
@item PATH
@vindex PATH, environment variable
A colon-separated list of directories containing executable files.
......
......@@ -778,7 +778,7 @@ fill-column's value is 70
Automatically becomes buffer-local when set.
This variable is safe as a file local variable if its value
satisfies the predicate `integerp'.
satisfies the predicate @code{integerp}.
Documentation:
Column beyond which automatic line-wrapping should happen.
......@@ -2213,10 +2213,10 @@ require one and some contexts require the other.
keys which send non-@acronym{ASCII} characters.
@item True:
@code{t} stands for `true'.
@code{t} stands for ``true''.
@item False:
@code{nil} stands for `false'.
@code{nil} stands for ``false''.
@item Other Lisp objects:
@cindex Lisp object syntax
......@@ -2247,8 +2247,8 @@ line.
(setq c-tab-always-indent nil)
@end example
Here we have a variable whose value is normally @code{t} for `true'
and the alternative is @code{nil} for `false'.
Here we have a variable whose value is normally @code{t} for ``true''
and the alternative is @code{nil} for ``false''.
@item
Make searches case sensitive by default (in all buffers that do not
......
......@@ -376,7 +376,7 @@ for @file{..} and typing @kbd{f} there.
@end table
@node Marks vs Flags
@section Dired Marks vs. Flags
@section Dired Marks vs.@: Flags
@cindex marking many files (in Dired)
Instead of flagging a file with @samp{D}, you can @dfn{mark} the
......
......@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ display editor. This manual describes how to edit with Emacs and
some of the ways to customize it; it corresponds to GNU Emacs version
@value{EMACSVER}.
@c See `manual-html-mono' and `manual-html-node' in admin/admin.el.
@c See 'manual-html-mono' and 'manual-html-node' in admin/admin.el.
@ifset WWW_GNU_ORG
@html
The homepage for GNU Emacs is at
......@@ -239,9 +239,9 @@ Indexes (each index contains a large menu)
* Concept Index:: An item for each concept.
@c Do NOT modify the following 3 lines! They must have this form to
@c be correctly identified by `texinfo-multiple-files-update'. In
@c be correctly identified by 'texinfo-multiple-files-update'. In
@c particular, the detailed menu header line MUST be identical to the
@c value of `texinfo-master-menu-header'. See texnfo-upd.el.
@c value of 'texinfo-master-menu-header'. See texnfo-upd.el.
@detailmenu
--- The Detailed Node Listing ---
......@@ -391,7 +391,7 @@ Searching and Replacement
* Symbol Search:: Search for a source code symbol.
* Regexp Search:: Search for match for a regexp.
* Regexps:: Syntax of regular expressions.
* Regexp Backslash:: Regular expression constructs starting with `\'.
* Regexp Backslash:: Regular expression constructs starting with '\'.
* Regexp Example:: A complex regular expression explained.
* Search Case:: To ignore case while searching, or not.
* Replace:: Search, and replace some or all matches.
......@@ -1149,7 +1149,7 @@ The Emacs Initialization File
Dealing with Emacs Trouble
* DEL Does Not Delete:: What to do if @key{DEL} doesn't delete.
* Stuck Recursive:: `[...]' in mode line around the parentheses.
* Stuck Recursive:: '[...]' in mode line around the parentheses.
* Screen Garbled:: Garbage on the screen.
* Text Garbled:: Garbage in the text.
* Memory Full:: How to cope when you run out of memory.
......
......@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ by mistake. One thing you can do is type @kbd{M-~}
(@code{not-modified}), which clears out the indication that the buffer
is modified. If you do this, none of the save commands will believe
that the buffer needs to be saved. (@samp{~} is often used as a
mathematical symbol for `not'; thus @kbd{M-~} is `not', metafied.)
mathematical symbol for ``not''; thus @kbd{M-~} is ``not'', metafied.)
Alternatively, you can cancel all the changes made since the file was
visited or saved, by reading the text from the file again. This is
called @dfn{reverting}. @xref{Reverting}. (You could also undo all
......
......@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ be preserved if the buffer is lost due to a system error or user error.
@item Autoloading
Emacs can automatically load Lisp libraries when a Lisp program requests a
function from those libraries. This is called `autoloading'.
function from those libraries. This is called ``autoloading''.
@xref{Lisp Libraries}.
@item Backtrace
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ A base buffer is a buffer whose text is shared by an indirect buffer
Some human languages, such as English, are written from left to right.
Others, such as Arabic, are written from right to left. Emacs
supports both of these forms, as well as any mixture of them---this
is `bidirectional text'. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
is ``bidirectional text''. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
@item Bind
To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.).
......@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ X}). Borders are not the same as fringes (q.v.).
@item Buffer
The buffer is the basic editing unit; one buffer corresponds to one text
being edited. You normally have several buffers, but at any time you are
editing only one, the `current buffer', though several can be visible
editing only one, the ``current buffer'', though several can be visible
when you are using multiple windows or frames (q.v.). Most buffers
are visiting (q.v.@:) some file. @xref{Buffers}.
......@@ -265,7 +265,7 @@ normally (but see @ref{Glossary---Truncation}) takes up more than one
screen line when displayed. We say that the text line is continued, and all
screen lines used for it after the first are called continuation
lines. @xref{Continuation Lines}. A related Emacs feature is
`filling' (q.v.).
``filling'' (q.v.).
@item Control Character
A control character is a character that you type by holding down the
......@@ -310,8 +310,8 @@ between defuns, the current defun is the one that follows point.
The cursor is the rectangle on the screen which indicates the position
(called point; q.v.@:) at which insertion and deletion takes place.
The cursor is on or under the character that follows point. Often
people speak of `the cursor' when, strictly speaking, they mean
`point'. @xref{Point,Cursor}.
people speak of ``the cursor'' when, strictly speaking, they mean
``point''. @xref{Point,Cursor}.
@item Customization
Customization is making minor changes in the way Emacs works, to
......@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ it is interpreted relative to the current buffer's default directory.
@item Defun
A defun is a major definition at the top level in a program. The name
`defun' comes from Lisp, where most such definitions use the construct
``defun'' comes from Lisp, where most such definitions use the construct
@code{defun}. @xref{Defuns}.
@item @key{DEL}
......@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ confirmation. The usual reason for disabling a command is that it is
confusing for beginning users. @xref{Disabling}.
@item Down Event
Short for `button down event' (q.v.).
Short for ``button down event'' (q.v.).
@item Drag Event
A drag event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated when you
......@@ -598,7 +598,7 @@ correspond to any character. @xref{Function Keys}.
@item Global
Global means ``independent of the current environment; in effect
throughout Emacs''. It is the opposite of local (q.v.). Particular
examples of the use of `global' appear below.
examples of the use of ``global'' appear below.
@item Global Abbrev
A global definition of an abbrev (q.v.@:) is effective in all major
......@@ -824,8 +824,8 @@ lists. @xref{Moving by Parens}.
@item Local
Local means ``in effect only in a particular context''; the relevant
kind of context is a particular function execution, a particular
buffer, or a particular major mode. It is the opposite of `global'
(q.v.). Specific uses of `local' in Emacs terminology appear below.
buffer, or a particular major mode. It is the opposite of ``global''
(q.v.). Specific uses of ``local'' in Emacs terminology appear below.
@item Local Abbrev
A local abbrev definition is effective only if a particular major mode
......@@ -848,7 +848,7 @@ one of the modifier keys that can accompany any character.
@item @kbd{M-C-}
@kbd{M-C-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for
Control-Meta; it means the same thing as `@kbd{C-M-}' (q.v.).
Control-Meta; it means the same thing as @kbd{C-M-} (q.v.).
@item @kbd{M-x}
@kbd{M-x} is the key sequence that is used to call an Emacs command by
......@@ -1121,7 +1121,7 @@ Many commands operate on the text of the region. @xref{Mark,Region}.
@item Register
Registers are named slots in which text, buffer positions, or
rectangles can be saved for later use. @xref{Registers}. A related
Emacs feature is `bookmarks' (q.v.).
Emacs feature is ``bookmarks'' (q.v.).
@anchor{Glossary---Regular Expression}
@item Regular Expression
......@@ -1233,15 +1233,15 @@ Emacs has commands for moving by or killing by sentences.
@anchor{Glossary---Server}
@item Server
Within Emacs, you can start a `server' process, which listens for
connections from `clients'. This offers a faster alternative to
Within Emacs, you can start a ``server'' process, which listens for
connections from ``clients''. This offers a faster alternative to
starting several Emacs instances. @xref{Emacs Server}, and
@ref{Glossary---Daemon}.
@c This is only covered in the lispref, not the user manual.
@ignore
@item Session Manager
Some window systems (q.v.@:) provide a tool called a `session manager'.
Some window systems (q.v.@:) provide a tool called a ``session manager''.
This offers the ability to save your windows when you log off,
and restore them after you log in again.
@end ignore
......@@ -1250,7 +1250,7 @@ and restore them after you log in again.
A sexp (short for ``s-expression'') is the basic syntactic unit of
Lisp in its textual form: either a list, or Lisp atom. Sexps are also
the balanced expressions (q.v.@:) of the Lisp language; this is why
the commands for editing balanced expressions have `sexp' in their
the commands for editing balanced expressions have @samp{sexp} in their
name. @xref{Expressions,Sexps}.
@item Simultaneous Editing
......@@ -1327,7 +1327,7 @@ Emacs does not make a termscript file unless you tell it to.
@xref{Bugs}.
@item Text
`Text' has two meanings (@pxref{Text}):
``Text'' has two meanings (@pxref{Text}):
@itemize @bullet
@item
......@@ -1420,7 +1420,7 @@ that you can customize Emacs by setting it to a new value.
@item Variable
A variable is an object in Lisp that can store an arbitrary value.
Emacs uses some variables for internal purposes, and has others (known
as `user options'; q.v.@:) just so that you can set their values to
as ``user options''; q.v.@:) just so that you can set their values to
control the behavior of Emacs. The variables used in Emacs that you
are likely to be interested in are listed in the Variables Index in
this manual (@pxref{Variable Index}). @xref{Variables}, for
......@@ -1448,7 +1448,7 @@ Emacs divides a frame (q.v.@:) into one or more windows, each of which
can display the contents of one buffer (q.v.@:) at any time.
@xref{Screen}, for basic information on how Emacs uses the screen.
@xref{Windows}, for commands to control the use of windows. Some
other editors use the term ``window'' for what we call a `frame'
other editors use the term ``window'' for what we call a ``frame''
(q.v.@:) in Emacs.
@item Window System
......
......@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ memory, because they are the easiest machines to make it run on. The extra
effort to make it run on smaller machines will be left to someone who wants
to use it on them.
To avoid horrible confusion, please pronounce the `G' in the word `GNU'
To avoid horrible confusion, please pronounce the ``G'' in the word ``GNU''
when it is the name of this project.
@unnumberedsec Why I Must Write GNU
......
......@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ are always displayed as empty spaces extending to the next
@dfn{display tab stop}. @xref{Text Display}.
@node Just Spaces
@section Tabs vs. Spaces
@section Tabs vs.@: Spaces
@vindex tab-width
Normally, indentation commands insert (or remove) an optimal mix of
......
......@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ font are stored in the variables @code{ns-input-font} and
@item ns-power-off
This event occurs when the user logs out and Emacs is still running, or when
`Quit Emacs' is chosen from the application menu.
``Quit Emacs'' is chosen from the application menu.
The default behavior is to save all file-visiting buffers.
@end table
......
......@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ basic editing operations under Bazaar.
@cindex src
@item
SRC (src) is RCS, reloaded - a specialized version-control system
designed for single-file projects worked on by only one person. It
designed for single-file projects worked on by only one person. It
allows multiple files with independent version-control histories to
exist in one directory, and is thus particularly well suited for
maintaining small documents, scripts, and dotfiles. While it uses RCS
......@@ -1570,7 +1570,7 @@ dated in May 1993, with two items and one item respectively.
@smallexample
1993-05-25 Richard Stallman <rms@@gnu.org>
* man.el: Rename symbols `man-*' to `Man-*'.
* man.el: Rename symbols 'man-*' to 'Man-*'.
(manual-entry): Make prompt string clearer.
* simple.el (blink-matching-paren-distance):
......
......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
# Where to find the source code. The source code for Emacs's C kernel is
# expected to be in $(srcdir)/src, and the source code for Emacs's
# utility programs is expected to be in $(srcdir)/lib-src. This is
# set by the configure script's `--srcdir' option.
# set by the configure script's '--srcdir' option.
srcdir=.
infodir = $(srcdir)/../../info
......@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ INFO_TARGETS = $(infodir)/emacs$(INFO_EXT)
DVI_TARGETS = emacs.dvi
INFOSOURCES = info.texi
# The following rule does not work with all versions of `make'.
# The following rule does not work with all versions of 'make'.
.SUFFIXES: .texi .dvi
.texi.dvi:
texi2dvi $<
......
......@@ -843,9 +843,9 @@ show-paren-mode}.
Electric Pair mode, a global minor mode, provides a way to easily
insert matching delimiters. Whenever you insert an opening delimiter,
the matching closing delimiter is automatically inserted as well,
leaving point between the two. Conversely, when you insert a closing
leaving point between the two. Conversely, when you insert a closing
delimiter over an existing one, no inserting takes places and that
position is simply skipped over. These variables control additional
position is simply skipped over. These variables control additional
features of Electric Pair mode:
@itemize @bullet
......
......@@ -1004,10 +1004,10 @@ Here is a list of these commands:
@table @kbd
@item n
Move to next line, skipping lines saying `deleted', and select its
Move to next line, skipping lines saying ``deleted'', and select its
message (@code{rmail-summary-next-msg}).
@item p
Move to previous line, skipping lines saying `deleted', and select
Move to previous line, skipping lines saying ``deleted'', and select
its message (@code{rmail-summary-previous-msg}).
@item M-n
Move to next line and select its message (@code{rmail-summary-next-all}).
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ thing, but search for patterns instead of fixed strings.
* Symbol Search:: Search for a source code symbol.
* Regexp Search:: Search for match for a regexp.
* Regexps:: Syntax of regular expressions.
* Regexp Backslash:: Regular expression constructs starting with `\'.
* Regexp Backslash:: Regular expression constructs starting with '\'.
* Regexp Example:: A complex regular expression explained.
* Search Case:: To ignore case while searching, or not.
* Replace:: Search, and replace some or all matches.
......
......@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ Emacs.
@menu
* DEL Does Not Delete:: What to do if @key{DEL} doesn't delete.
* Stuck Recursive:: `[...]' in mode line around the parentheses.
* Stuck Recursive:: '[...]' in mode line around the parentheses.
* Screen Garbled:: Garbage on the screen.
* Text Garbled:: Garbage in the text.
* Memory Full:: How to cope when you run out of memory.
......@@ -1171,7 +1171,7 @@ feel that the purpose needs explaining, it probably does---but put the
explanation in comments in the code. It will be more useful there.
Please look at the change log entries of recent commits to see what
sorts of information to put in, and to learn the style that we use. Note that,
sorts of information to put in, and to learn the style that we use. Note that,
unlike some other projects, we do require change logs for
documentation, i.e., Texinfo files.
@xref{Change Log},
......@@ -1280,7 +1280,7 @@ See the Emacs project page
It is important to write your patch based on the current working
version. If you start from an older version, your patch may be
outdated (so that maintainers will have a hard time applying it), or
changes in Emacs may have made your patch unnecessary. After you have
changes in Emacs may have made your patch unnecessary. After you have
downloaded the repository source, you should read the file
@file{INSTALL.REPO} for build instructions (they differ to some extent
from a normal build).
......
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ As above, but only find entries for the current buffer's file.
For example, suppose the first line of @file{ChangeLog} is dated
1999-04-10, and that the only check-in since then was by Nathaniel
Bowditch to @file{rcs2log} on 1999-05-22 with log entry @samp{Ignore
log messages that start with `#'.}. Then @kbd{C-x v a} inserts this
log messages that start with '#'.}. Then @kbd{C-x v a} inserts this
@file{ChangeLog} entry:
@iftex
......@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ log messages that start with `#'.}. Then @kbd{C-x v a} inserts this
@group
1999-05-22 Nathaniel Bowditch <nat@@apn.org>
* rcs2log: Ignore log messages that start with `#'.
* rcs2log: Ignore log messages that start with '#'.
@end group
@end smallexample
@iftex
......
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