Commit 505b55e6 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Clarify `p' commands again.

parent c7501041
......@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ times of sunrise and sunset for any date.
@item S
Display times of sunrise and sunset for the selected date
(@code{calendar-sunrise-sunset}).
@item Mouse-2 Sunrise/Sunset
@item Mouse-2 Sunrise/sunset
Display times of sunrise and sunset for the date you click on.
@item M-x sunrise-sunset
Display times of sunrise and sunset for today's date.
......@@ -482,7 +482,7 @@ Display times of sunrise and sunset for a specified date.
Within the calendar, to display the @emph{local times} of sunrise and
sunset in the echo area, move point to the date you want, and type
@kbd{S}. Alternatively, click @kbd{Mouse-2} on the date, then choose
@kbd{Sunrise/Sunset} from the menu that appears. The command @kbd{M-x
@samp{Sunrise/sunset} from the menu that appears. The command @kbd{M-x
sunrise-sunset} is available outside the calendar to display this
information for today's date or a specified date. To specify a date
other than today, use @kbd{C-u M-x sunrise-sunset}, which prompts for
......@@ -680,7 +680,7 @@ repeated in a cycle of sixty.
in various other calendar systems:
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-2 Other Calendars
@item Mouse-2 Other calendars
Display the date that you click on, expressed in various other calendars.
@kindex p @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex calendar-print-iso-date
......@@ -727,14 +727,15 @@ Display Mayan date for selected day (@code{calendar-print-mayan-date}).
If you are using X, the easiest way to translate a date into other
calendars is to click on it with @kbd{Mouse-2}, then choose @kbd{Other
Calendars} from the menu that appears. This displays the equivalent
calendars} from the menu that appears. This displays the equivalent
forms of the date in all the calendars Emacs understands, in the form of
a menu. (Choosing an alternative from this menu doesn't actually do
anything---the menu is used only for display.)
Put point on the desired date of the Gregorian calendar, then type the
appropriate keys. The @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print'' since Emacs
``prints'' the equivalent date in the echo area.
Otherwise, move point to the date you want to convert, then type the
appropriate command starting with @kbd{p} from the table above. The
prefix @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print,'' since Emacs ``prints'' the
equivalent date in the echo area.
@node From Other Calendar
@subsection Converting From Other Calendars
......@@ -973,8 +974,8 @@ it shows all the diary entries for that many successive days. Thus,
following day.
Another way to display the diary entries for a date is to click
@kbd{Mouse-2} on the date, and then choose @kbd{Diary} from the menu
that appears.
@kbd{Mouse-2} on the date, and then choose @kbd{Diary entries} from
the menu that appears.
@kindex m @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex mark-diary-entries
......@@ -1482,7 +1483,7 @@ tells Emacs that the current interval is over.
@cindex @file{.timelog} file
@vindex timeclock-file
@findex timeclock-reread-log
The timeclock functions work by accumulating the data on a file
The timeclock functions work by accumulating the data in a file
called @file{.timelog} in your home directory. (On MS-DOS, this file
is called @file{_timelog}, since an initial period is not allowed in
file names on MS-DOS.) You can specify a different name for this file
......
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