Commit 511002e9 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Frames): Delete unnecessary mention of Windows.

(Mouse Commands): Likewise.  Mention xterm mouse support.
(Clipboard): Clarify.
(Mouse References): Mention use of Mouse-1 for following links.
(Menu Mouse Clicks): Clarify.
(Mode Line Mouse): Clarify.
(Drag and Drop): Rewrite.
parent 6d8d2de0
...@@ -29,10 +29,6 @@ frame. ...@@ -29,10 +29,6 @@ frame.
so that you can use many of the features described in this chapter. so that you can use many of the features described in this chapter.
@xref{MS-DOS Input}, for more information. @xref{MS-DOS Input}, for more information.
@cindex MS Windows
Emacs compiled for MS Windows mostly supports the same features as
under X.
@menu @menu
* Mouse Commands:: Moving, cutting, and pasting, with the mouse. * Mouse Commands:: Moving, cutting, and pasting, with the mouse.
* Secondary Selection:: Cutting without altering point and mark. * Secondary Selection:: Cutting without altering point and mark.
...@@ -64,7 +60,9 @@ under X. ...@@ -64,7 +60,9 @@ under X.
The mouse commands for selecting and copying a region are mostly The mouse commands for selecting and copying a region are mostly
compatible with the @code{xterm} program. You can use the same mouse compatible with the @code{xterm} program. You can use the same mouse
commands for copying between Emacs and other X client programs. commands for copying between Emacs and other window-based programs.
Most of these commands also work in Emacs when you run it under an
@code{xterm} terminal.
@kindex DELETE @r{(and mouse selection)} @kindex DELETE @r{(and mouse selection)}
If you select a region with any of these mouse commands, and then If you select a region with any of these mouse commands, and then
...@@ -188,8 +186,6 @@ you want. Then yank it in Emacs with @kbd{C-y} or @kbd{Mouse-2}. ...@@ -188,8 +186,6 @@ you want. Then yank it in Emacs with @kbd{C-y} or @kbd{Mouse-2}.
system for X selections, use @kbd{C-x @key{RET} x} or @kbd{C-x system for X selections, use @kbd{C-x @key{RET} x} or @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} X}. @xref{Specify Coding}. @key{RET} X}. @xref{Specify Coding}.
These cutting and pasting commands also work on MS-Windows.
@cindex primary selection @cindex primary selection
@cindex cut buffer @cindex cut buffer
@cindex selection, primary @cindex selection, primary
...@@ -270,7 +266,7 @@ that matters is which window you click on. @xref{Mouse Commands}. ...@@ -270,7 +266,7 @@ that matters is which window you click on. @xref{Mouse Commands}.
@cindex OpenWindows @cindex OpenWindows
@cindex Gnome @cindex Gnome
As well as the primary and secondary selection types, X supports a Apart from the primary and secondary selection types, X supports a
@dfn{clipboard} selection type which is used by some applications, @dfn{clipboard} selection type which is used by some applications,
particularly under OpenWindows and Gnome. particularly under OpenWindows and Gnome.
...@@ -287,28 +283,42 @@ unlike most systems. ...@@ -287,28 +283,42 @@ unlike most systems.
@node Mouse References @node Mouse References
@section Following References with the Mouse @section Following References with the Mouse
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(selection)}
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(selection)} @kindex Mouse-2 @r{(selection)}
Some Emacs buffers display lists of various sorts. These include Some read-only Emacs buffers include references you can follow, or
lists of files, of buffers, of possible completions, of matches for commands you can activate. These include names of files, of buffers,
a pattern, and so on. of possible completions, of matches for a pattern, as well as the
buttons in Help buffers and customization buffers. You can follow the
Since yanking text into these buffers is not very useful, most of them reference or activate the command by moving point to it and typing
define @kbd{Mouse-2} specially, as a command to use or view the item you @key{RET}. You can also do this with the mouse, using either
click on. @kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2}.
For example, if you click @kbd{Mouse-2} on a file name in a Dired Since yanking text into a read-only buffer is not allowed, these
buffer, you visit that file. If you click @kbd{Mouse-2} on an error buffers generally define @kbd{Mouse-2} to follow a reference or
message in the @samp{*Compilation*} buffer, you go to the source code activate a command. For example, if you click @kbd{Mouse-2} on a file
for that error message. If you click @kbd{Mouse-2} on a completion in name in a Dired buffer, you visit that file. If you click
the @samp{*Completions*} buffer, you choose that completion. @kbd{Mouse-2} on an error message in the @samp{*Compilation*} buffer,
you go to the source code for that error message. If you click
@kbd{Mouse-2} on a completion in the @samp{*Completions*} buffer, you
choose that completion.
@vindex mouse-1-click-follows-link
However, most applications use @kbd{Mouse-1} to do this sort of
thing, so Emacs implements this too. If you click @kbd{Mouse-1}
quickly on a reference or button, it follows or activates. If you
click slowly, it moves point as usual. Dragging, meaning moving the
mouse while it is held down, also has its usual behavior of setting
the region. The variable @code{mouse-1-click-follows-link} controls
whether @kbd{Mouse-1} has this behavior.
@vindex mouse-highlight @vindex mouse-highlight
You can usually tell when @kbd{Mouse-2} has this special sort of You can usually tell when @kbd{Mouse-1} and @kbd{Mouse-2} have this
meaning because the sensitive text highlights when you move the mouse special sort of meaning because the sensitive text highlights when you
over it. The variable @code{mouse-highlight} controls whether to do move the mouse over it. The variable @code{mouse-highlight} controls
this highlighting always (even when such text appears where the mouse whether to do this highlighting always (even when such text appears
already is), never, or only immediately after you move the mouse. where the mouse already is), never, or only immediately after you move
the mouse.
@node Menu Mouse Clicks @node Menu Mouse Clicks
@section Mouse Clicks for Menus @section Mouse Clicks for Menus
...@@ -331,16 +341,17 @@ for editing formatted text. @xref{Formatted Text}. ...@@ -331,16 +341,17 @@ for editing formatted text. @xref{Formatted Text}.
@item C-Mouse-3 @item C-Mouse-3
@kindex C-Mouse-3 @kindex C-Mouse-3
This menu is mode-specific. For most modes if Menu-bar mode is on, this This menu is mode-specific. For most modes if Menu-bar mode is on,
menu has the same items as all the mode-specific menu-bar menus put this menu has the same items as all the mode-specific menu-bar menus
together. Some modes may specify a different menu for this put together. Some modes may specify a different menu for this
button.@footnote{Some systems use @kbd{Mouse-3} for a mode-specific button.@footnote{Some systems use @kbd{Mouse-3} for a mode-specific
menu. We took a survey of users, and found they preferred to keep menu. We took a survey of users, and found they preferred to keep
@kbd{Mouse-3} for selecting and killing regions. Hence the decision to @kbd{Mouse-3} for selecting and killing regions. Hence the decision
use @kbd{C-Mouse-3} for this menu.} If Menu-bar mode is off, this menu to use @kbd{C-Mouse-3} for this menu. To use @kbd{Mouse-3} instead,
contains all the items which would be present in the menu bar---not just do @code{(global-set-key [mouse-3] 'mouse-popup-menubar-stuff)}.} If
the mode-specific ones---so that you can access them without having to Menu-bar mode is off, this menu contains all the items which would be
display the menu bar. present in the menu bar---not just the mode-specific ones---so that
you can access them without having to display the menu bar.
@item S-Mouse-1 @item S-Mouse-1
This menu is for specifying the frame's principal font. This menu is for specifying the frame's principal font.
...@@ -357,9 +368,9 @@ windows. ...@@ -357,9 +368,9 @@ windows.
@table @kbd @table @kbd
@item Mouse-1 @item Mouse-1
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(mode line)} @kindex Mouse-1 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-1} on a mode line selects the window above. By dragging @kbd{Mouse-1} on a mode line selects the window it belongs to. By
@kbd{Mouse-1} on the mode line, you can move it, thus changing the dragging @kbd{Mouse-1} on the mode line, you can move it, thus
height of the windows above and below. changing the height of the windows above and below.
@item Mouse-2 @item Mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(mode line)} @kindex Mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
...@@ -367,9 +378,9 @@ height of the windows above and below. ...@@ -367,9 +378,9 @@ height of the windows above and below.
@item Mouse-3 @item Mouse-3
@kindex Mouse-3 @r{(mode line)} @kindex Mouse-3 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-3} on a mode line deletes the window above. If the frame has @kbd{Mouse-3} on a mode line deletes the window it belongs to. If the
only one window, it buries the current buffer instead and switches to frame has only one window, it buries the current buffer instead, and
another buffer. switches to another buffer.
@item C-Mouse-2 @item C-Mouse-2
@kindex C-mouse-2 @r{(mode line)} @kindex C-mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
...@@ -798,19 +809,24 @@ generating appropriate events for Emacs. ...@@ -798,19 +809,24 @@ generating appropriate events for Emacs.
@code{mouse-wheel-scroll-amount} determine where and by how much @code{mouse-wheel-scroll-amount} determine where and by how much
buffers are scrolled. buffers are scrolled.
@node Drag and drop @node Drag and Drop
@section Drag and drop in Emacs. @section Drag and Drop
@cindex drag and drop @cindex drag and drop
Emacs supports drag and drop so that dropping of files and text is handled.
Currently supported drag and drop protocols are XDND, Motif and the old
KDE 1.x protocol. There is no drag support yet.
When text is dropped on Emacs, Emacs inserts the text where it is dropped.
When a file is dragged from a file manager to Emacs, Emacs opens that file.
As a special case, if a file is dropped on a dired buffer the file is
copied or moved (depends on exactly how it is dragged and the application
it was dragged from) to the directory the dired buffer is displaying.
Emacs supports @cindex{drag and drop} using the mouse. For
instance, dropping text onto an Emacs frame inserts the text where it
is dropped. Dropping a file onto an Emacs frame visits that file. As
a special case, dropping the file on a Dired buffer moves or copies
the file (according to the conventions of the application it came
from) into the directory displayed in that buffer.
@vindex x-dnd-open-file-other-window
Dropping a file normally visits it in the window you drop it on. If
you prefer to visit the file in a new window in such cases, customize
the variable @code{x-dnd-open-file-other-window}.
@ignore
@c ??? To Lisp manual
@vindex x-dnd-test-function @vindex x-dnd-test-function
@vindex x-dnd-known-types @vindex x-dnd-known-types
When a user drags something from another application over Emacs, that other When a user drags something from another application over Emacs, that other
...@@ -822,26 +838,24 @@ which accepts drops if the type of the data to be dropped is present in ...@@ -822,26 +838,24 @@ which accepts drops if the type of the data to be dropped is present in
@code{x-dnd-known-types} if you want Emacs to accept or reject drops based @code{x-dnd-known-types} if you want Emacs to accept or reject drops based
on some other criteria. on some other criteria.
@vindex x-dnd-open-file-other-window
A file is normally opened in the window it is dropped on, but if you
prefer the file to be opened in a new window you can customize the variable
@code{x-dnd-open-file-other-window}.
@vindex x-dnd-types-alist @vindex x-dnd-types-alist
If you want to change the way Emacs handles drop of different types If you want to change the way Emacs handles drop of different types
or add a new type, you shall customize @code{x-dnd-types-alist}. This or add a new type, customize @code{x-dnd-types-alist}. This requires
requires detailed knowledge of what types other applications use detailed knowledge of what types other applications use for drag and
for drag and drop. drop.
@vindex x-dnd-protocol-alist @vindex x-dnd-protocol-alist
When an URL is dropped on Emacs it may be a file, but it may also be When an URL is dropped on Emacs it may be a file, but it may also be
another URL type (ftp, http, etc.). Emacs first checks another URL type (ftp, http, etc.). Emacs first checks
@code{x-dnd-protocol-alist} to determine what to do with the URL. If there @code{x-dnd-protocol-alist} to determine what to do with the URL. If
is no match there and if @code{browse-url-browser-function} is an alist, there is no match there and if @code{browse-url-browser-function} is
Emacs looks for a match there. If no match is found the text for the URL an alist, Emacs looks for a match there. If no match is found the
is inserted. If you want to alter Emacs behaviour you can customize these text for the URL is inserted. If you want to alter Emacs behavior,
variables. you can customize these variables.
@end ignore
The drag and drop protocols XDND, Motif and the
old KDE 1.x protocol are currently supported.
@node Menu Bars @node Menu Bars
@section Menu Bars @section Menu Bars
...@@ -873,20 +887,20 @@ menus. ...@@ -873,20 +887,20 @@ menus.
@cindex mode, Tool Bar @cindex mode, Tool Bar
@cindex icons, toolbar @cindex icons, toolbar
The @dfn{tool bar} is a line (or multiple lines) of icons at the top The @dfn{tool bar} is a line (or lines) of icons at the top of the
of the Emacs window. You can click on these icons with the mouse Emacs window, just below the menu bar. You can click on these icons
to do various jobs. with the mouse to do various jobs.
The global tool bar contains general commands. Some major modes The global tool bar contains general commands. Some major modes
define their own tool bars to replace it. A few ``special'' modes define their own tool bars to replace it. A few ``special'' modes
that are not designed for ordinary editing remove some items from the that are not designed for ordinary editing remove some items from the
global tool bar. global tool bar.
Tool bars work only on a graphical display. The tool bar uses colored Tool bars work only on a graphical display. The tool bar uses colored
XPM icons if Emacs was built with XPM support. Otherwise, the tool XPM icons if Emacs was built with XPM support. Otherwise, the tool
bar uses monochrome icons (PBM or XBM format). bar uses monochrome icons (PBM or XBM format).
You can turn display of tool bars on or off with @kbd{M-x You can turn display of tool bars on or off with @kbd{M-x
tool-bar-mode}. tool-bar-mode}.
@node Dialog Boxes @node Dialog Boxes
......
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