Commit 51866758 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

More changes in the Emacs manual

* doc/emacs/text.texi (Words, Foldout, Table Conversion): Clarify
text.  Reported by Gijs Hillenius <gijs@hillenius.net> in
emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.

* doc/emacs/msdos.texi (Windows Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/msdos-xtra.texi (MS-DOS Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/macos.texi (Mac / GNUstep Basics):
* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary):
* doc/emacs/custom.texi (Function Keys, Init Syntax):
* doc/emacs/commands.texi (User Input):
* doc/emacs/basic.texi (Arguments): Fix capitalization of "Meta".
* doc/emacs/msdos.texi (Windows Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/dired.texi (Dired Updating):
* doc/emacs/custom.texi (Init Rebinding): Fix misuses of @key.
Suggested by Richard Stallman <rms@gnu.org>.
parent b1aaa72d
......@@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ direction.
@findex digit-argument
@findex negative-argument
The easiest way to specify a numeric argument is to type a digit
and/or a minus sign while holding down the @key{META} key. For
and/or a minus sign while holding down the @key{Meta} key. For
example,
@example
......@@ -742,7 +742,7 @@ well as @kbd{M--}, are bound to commands (@code{digit-argument} and
command. @kbd{M--} without digits normally means @minus{}1.
If you enter more than one digit, you need not hold down the
@key{META} key for the second and subsequent digits. Thus, to move
@key{Meta} key for the second and subsequent digits. Thus, to move
down fifty lines, type
@example
......
......@@ -44,25 +44,25 @@ are certain characters found on non-English keyboards
@cindex M-
Emacs also recognizes control characters that are entered using
@dfn{modifier keys}. Two commonly-used modifier keys are
@key{Control} (usually labeled @key{Ctrl}), and @key{META} (usually
labeled @key{Alt})@footnote{We refer to @key{Alt} as @key{META} for
@key{Control} (usually labeled @key{Ctrl}), and @key{Meta} (usually
labeled @key{Alt})@footnote{We refer to @key{Alt} as @key{Meta} for
historical reasons.}. For example, @kbd{Control-a} is entered by
holding down the @key{Ctrl} key while pressing @kbd{a}; we will refer
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly, @kbd{@key{META}-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly, @kbd{@key{Meta}-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
for short, is entered by holding down the @key{Alt} key and pressing
@kbd{a}. Modifier keys can also be applied to non-alphanumerical
characters, e.g., @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{LEFT}}.
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{META} key
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{Meta} key
You can also type Meta characters using two-character sequences
starting with @key{ESC}. Thus, you can enter @kbd{M-a} by typing
@kbd{@key{ESC} a}. You can enter @kbd{C-M-a} (holding down both
@key{Ctrl} and @key{Alt}, then pressing @kbd{a}) by typing
@kbd{@key{ESC} C-a}. Unlike @key{META}, @key{ESC} is entered as a
@kbd{@key{ESC} C-a}. Unlike @key{Meta}, @key{ESC} is entered as a
separate character. You don't hold down @key{ESC} while typing the
next character; instead, press @key{ESC} and release it, then enter
the next character. This feature is useful on certain text terminals
where the @key{META} key does not function reliably.
where the @key{Meta} key does not function reliably.
@cindex keys stolen by window manager
@cindex window manager, keys stolen by
......
......@@ -1745,10 +1745,11 @@ characters. For example, here's how to bind @kbd{C-x M-l} to
(global-set-key "\C-x\M-l" 'make-symbolic-link)
@end example
To put @key{TAB}, @key{RET}, @key{ESC}, or @key{DEL} in the string,
use the Emacs Lisp escape sequences @samp{\t}, @samp{\r}, @samp{\e},
and @samp{\d} respectively. Here is an example which binds @kbd{C-x
@key{TAB}} to @code{indent-rigidly} (@pxref{Indentation}):
To bind a key sequence including @key{TAB}, @key{RET}, @key{ESC}, or
@key{DEL}, the string should contain the Emacs Lisp escape sequence
@samp{\t}, @samp{\r}, @samp{\e}, or @samp{\d} respectively. Here is
an example which binds @kbd{C-x @key{TAB}} to @code{indent-rigidly}
(@pxref{Indentation}):
@example
(global-set-key "\C-x\t" 'indent-rigidly)
......@@ -1822,11 +1823,11 @@ historical.
characters case-sensitive when you customize Emacs. For instance, you
could make @kbd{M-a} and @kbd{M-A} run different commands.
Although only the @key{Control} and @key{META} modifier keys are
Although only the @key{Control} and @key{Meta} modifier keys are
commonly used, Emacs supports three other modifier keys. These are
called @key{Super}, @key{Hyper}, and @key{Alt}. Few terminals provide
ways to use these modifiers; the key labeled @key{Alt} on most
keyboards usually issues the @key{META} modifier, not @key{Alt}. The
keyboards usually issues the @key{Meta} modifier, not @key{Alt}. The
standard key bindings in Emacs do not include any characters with
these modifiers. However, you can customize Emacs to assign meanings
to them. The modifier bits are labeled as @samp{s-}, @samp{H-} and
......@@ -1896,7 +1897,7 @@ the numeric keypad produces @code{kp-8}, which is translated to
such as @kbd{8} or @key{UP}, it affects the equivalent keypad key too.
However, if you rebind a @samp{kp-} key directly, that won't affect
its non-keypad equivalent. Note that the modified keys are not
translated: for instance, if you hold down the @key{META} key while
translated: for instance, if you hold down the @key{Meta} key while
pressing the @samp{8} key on the numeric keypad, that generates
@kbd{M-@key{kp-8}}.
......@@ -2241,8 +2242,8 @@ sequences are mandatory.
@samp{\C-} can be used as a prefix for a control character, as in
@samp{\C-s} for @acronym{ASCII} control-S, and @samp{\M-} can be used as a prefix for
a Meta character, as in @samp{\M-a} for @kbd{@key{META}-A} or
@samp{\M-\C-a} for @kbd{@key{Ctrl}-@key{META}-A}.
a Meta character, as in @samp{\M-a} for @kbd{@key{Meta}-A} or
@samp{\M-\C-a} for @kbd{@key{Ctrl}-@key{Meta}-A}.
@xref{Init Non-ASCII}, for information about including
non-@acronym{ASCII} in your init file.
......
......@@ -1229,7 +1229,7 @@ contents of the corresponding subdirectory.
If you use @kbd{C-x d} or some other Dired command to visit a
directory that is already being shown in a Dired buffer, Dired
switches to that buffer but does not update it. If the buffer is not
up-to-date, Dired displays a warning telling you to type @key{g} to
up-to-date, Dired displays a warning telling you to type @kbd{g} to
update it. You can also tell Emacs to revert each Dired buffer
automatically when you revisit it, by setting the variable
@code{dired-auto-revert-buffer} to a non-@code{nil} value.
......
......@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Alt is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
have. To make a character Alt, type it while holding down the @key{Alt}
key. Such characters are given names that start with @kbd{@key{Alt}-}
(usually written @kbd{A-} for short). (Note that many terminals have a
key labeled @key{Alt} that is really a @key{META} key.) @xref{User
key labeled @key{Alt} that is really a @key{Meta} key.) @xref{User
Input, Alt}.
@item Argument
......@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ misspelling.
@item @kbd{C-M-}
@kbd{C-M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for
Control-Meta. If your terminal lacks a real @key{META} key, you type
Control-Meta. If your terminal lacks a real @key{Meta} key, you type
a Control-Meta character by typing @key{ESC} and then typing the
corresponding Control character. @xref{User Input,C-M-}.
......@@ -507,7 +507,7 @@ Such messages appear in the echo area, accompanied by a beep.
@item @key{ESC}
@key{ESC} is a character used as a prefix for typing Meta characters on
keyboards lacking a @key{META} key. Unlike the @key{META} key (which,
keyboards lacking a @key{Meta} key. Unlike the @key{Meta} key (which,
like the @key{SHIFT} key, is held down while another character is
typed), you press the @key{ESC} key as you would press a letter key, and
it applies to the next character you type.
......@@ -881,7 +881,7 @@ A local value of a variable (q.v.@:) applies to only one buffer.
@xref{Locals}.
@item @kbd{M-}
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{META},
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{Meta},
one of the modifier keys that can accompany any character.
@xref{User Input,M-}.
......@@ -939,15 +939,15 @@ a keyboard interface to navigate it. @xref{Menu Bars}.
@item Meta
Meta is the name of a modifier bit which you can use in a command
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{META}
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{Meta}
key while typing the character. We refer to such characters with
names that start with @kbd{Meta-} (usually written @kbd{M-} for
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{META}
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{Meta}
and at the same time typing @kbd{<} (which itself is done, on most
terminals, by holding down @key{SHIFT} and typing @kbd{,}).
@xref{User Input,Meta}.
On some terminals, the @key{META} key is actually labeled @key{Alt}
On some terminals, the @key{Meta} key is actually labeled @key{Alt}
or @key{Edit}.
@item Meta Character
......
......@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ Support}), but we hope to improve it in the future.
@section Basic Emacs usage under macOS and GNUstep
By default, the @key{Alt} and @key{Option} keys are the same as
@key{META}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
@key{Meta}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
Emacs provides a set of key bindings using this modifier key that mimic
other Mac / GNUstep applications (@pxref{Mac / GNUstep Events}). You
can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key Bindings}).
......
......@@ -83,17 +83,17 @@ a running command and for emergency escape
@cindex Super (under MS-DOS)
@vindex dos-super-key
@vindex dos-hyper-key
The PC keyboard maps use the left @key{Alt} key as the @key{META} key.
The PC keyboard maps use the left @key{Alt} key as the @key{Meta} key.
You have two choices for emulating the @key{SUPER} and @key{Hyper} keys:
choose either the right @key{Ctrl} key or the right @key{Alt} key by
setting the variables @code{dos-hyper-key} and @code{dos-super-key} to 1
or 2 respectively. If neither @code{dos-super-key} nor
@code{dos-hyper-key} is 1, then by default the right @key{Alt} key is
also mapped to the @key{META} key. However, if the MS-DOS international
also mapped to the @key{Meta} key. However, if the MS-DOS international
keyboard support program @file{KEYB.COM} is installed, Emacs will
@emph{not} map the right @key{Alt} to @key{META}, since it is used for
@emph{not} map the right @key{Alt} to @key{Meta}, since it is used for
accessing characters like @kbd{~} and @kbd{@@} on non-US keyboard
layouts; in this case, you may only use the left @key{Alt} as @key{META}
layouts; in this case, you may only use the left @key{Alt} as @key{Meta}
key.
@kindex C-j @r{(MS-DOS)}
......
......@@ -547,7 +547,7 @@ Windows-specific variables in this category.
@ifnottex
@vindex w32-alt-is-meta
@cindex @code{Alt} key (MS-Windows)
By default, the key labeled @key{Alt} is mapped as the @key{META}
By default, the key labeled @key{Alt} is mapped as the @key{Meta}
key. If you wish it to produce the @code{Alt} modifier instead, set
the variable @code{w32-alt-is-meta} to a @code{nil} value.
......@@ -605,8 +605,8 @@ Windows key and @key{R} opens the Windows @code{Run} dialog.
The hotkey registrations always also include all the shift and
control modifier combinations for the given hotkey; that is,
registering @kbd{s-@key{a}} as a hotkey gives you @kbd{S-s-@key{a}},
@kbd{C-s-@key{a}} and @kbd{C-S-s-@key{a}} as well.
registering @kbd{s-a} as a hotkey gives you @kbd{S-s-a},
@kbd{C-s-a} and @kbd{C-S-s-a} as well.
On Windows 98 and ME, the hotkey registration is more restricted.
The desired hotkey must always be fully specified, and
......@@ -670,8 +670,8 @@ value other than the above modifier symbols.
@cindex @code{Alt} key invokes menu (Windows)
Emacs compiled as a native Windows application normally turns off
the Windows feature that tapping the @key{Alt} key invokes the Windows
menu. The reason is that the @key{Alt} serves as @key{META} in Emacs.
When using Emacs, users often press the @key{META} key temporarily and
menu. The reason is that the @key{Alt} serves as @key{Meta} in Emacs.
When using Emacs, users often press the @key{Meta} key temporarily and
then change their minds; if this has the effect of bringing up the
Windows menu, it alters the meaning of subsequent commands. Many
users find this frustrating.
......@@ -701,7 +701,7 @@ the combination of the right @key{Alt} and left @key{Ctrl} keys
pressed together, is recognized as the @key{AltGr} key. The default
is @code{t}, which means these keys produce @code{AltGr}; setting it
to @code{nil} causes @key{AltGr} or the equivalent key combination to
be interpreted as the combination of @key{Ctrl} and @key{META}
be interpreted as the combination of @key{Ctrl} and @key{Meta}
modifiers.
@end ifnottex
......
......@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ cognate to @kbd{C-@@}, which is an alias for @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}.
@findex backward-word
The commands @kbd{M-f} (@code{forward-word}) and @kbd{M-b}
(@code{backward-word}) move forward and backward over words. These
@key{META}-based key sequences are analogous to the key sequences
@key{Meta}-based key sequences are analogous to the key sequences
@kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-b}, which move over single characters. The
analogy extends to numeric arguments, which serve as repeat counts.
@kbd{M-f} with a negative argument moves backward, and @kbd{M-b} with
......@@ -1321,7 +1321,7 @@ quad click: exit all folds and hide text.
@c FIXME not marked as a user variable
@vindex foldout-mouse-modifiers
You can specify different modifier keys (instead of
@kbd{@key{Ctrl}-@key{META}-}) by setting @code{foldout-mouse-modifiers}; but if
@kbd{@key{Ctrl}-@key{Meta}-}) by setting @code{foldout-mouse-modifiers}; but if
you have already loaded the @file{foldout.el} library, you must reload
it in order for this to take effect.
......@@ -2755,8 +2755,7 @@ Invoking @kbd{M-x table-capture} on that text produces this table:
to plain text, removing its cell borders.
One application of this pair of commands is to edit a text in
layout. Look at the following three paragraphs (the latter two are
indented with header lines):
layout. Look at the following three paragraphs:
@example
table-capture is a powerful command.
......
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