Commit 5739d6f8 authored by Jason Rumney's avatar Jason Rumney

Document make targets.

parent 4ef65ef9
2008-04-10 Jason Rumney <jasonr@gnu.org>
* INSTALL: Document make targets.
2008-04-09 Jason Rumney <jasonr@gnu.org>
* makefile.w32-in (clean-other-dirs-nmake): Don't clean lisp dir.
......
......@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@
Other compilers may work, but specific reports from people that have
tried suggest that the Intel C compiler (for example) may produce an
Emacs executable with strange filename completion behaviour. Unless
Emacs executable with strange filename completion behavior. Unless
you would like to assist by finding and fixing the cause of any bugs
like this, we recommend the use of the supported compilers mentioned
in the previous paragraph.
......@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@
N.B. It is normal to see a few error messages output while configure
is running, when gcc support is being tested. These cannot be
surpressed because of limitations in the Windows 9x command.com shell.
suppressed because of limitations in the Windows 9x command.com shell.
You are encouraged to look at the file config.log which shows details
for failed tests, after configure.bat finishes. Any unexplained failure
......@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@
Some image libraries have dependencies on one another, or on zlib.
For example, tiff support depends on the jpeg library. If you did not
compile the libraries yourself, you must make sure that any dependency
is in the PATH or otherwise accesible and that the binaries are
is in the PATH or otherwise accessible and that the binaries are
compatible (for example, that they were built with the same compiler).
Binaries for the image libraries (among many others) can be found at
......@@ -351,6 +351,66 @@
The install process will run addpm to setup the registry entries, and
to create a Start menu icon for Emacs.
* Make targets
The following make targets may be used by users building the source
distribution, or users who have checked out of CVS after
an initial bootstrapping.
make
Builds Emacs from the available sources and pre-compiled lisp files.
make install
Installs programs to the bin directory, and runs addpm to create
Start Menu icons.
make clean
Removes object and executable files produced by the build process in
the current configuration. After make clean, you can rebuild with
the same configuration using make.
make distclean
In addition to the files removed by make clean, this also removes
Makefiles and other generated files to get back to the state of a
freshly unpacked source distribution. Note that this will not remove
installed files, or the results of builds performed with different
compiler or optimization options than the current configuration.
After make distclean, it is necessary to run configure.bat followed
by make to rebuild.
make cleanall
Removes object and executable files that may have been created by
previous builds with different configure options, in addition to
the files produced by the current configuration.
make realclean
Removes the installed files in the bin subdirectory in addition to
the files removed by make cleanall.
The following targets are intended only for users who have checked out
of CVS.
make bootstrap
Creates a temporary emacs binary with lisp source files and
uses it to compile the lisp files. Once the lisp files are built,
emacs is redumped with the compiled lisp.
make recompile
Recompiles any changed lisp files after a cvs update. This saves
doing a full bootstrap after every update. If this or a subsequent
make fail, you probably need to perform a full bootstrap, though
running this target multiple times may eventually sort out the
interdependencies.
make maintainer-clean
Removes everything that can be recreated, including compiled lisp
files, to get back to the state of a fresh CVS checkout. After make
maintainer-clean, it is necessary to run configure.bat and make
bootstrap to rebuild. Occasionally it may be necessary to run this
target after a cvs update.
* Trouble-shooting
The main problems that are likely to be encountered when building
......@@ -436,7 +496,7 @@
should be displayed in its "Debug" output window.
When you are in the process of debugging Emacs and you would like to
examine the contents of a Lisp_Object variable, popup the QuickWatch
examine the contents of a Lisp_Object variable, pop up the QuickWatch
window (QuickWatch has an eyeglass symbol on its button in the
toolbar). In the text field at the top of the window, enter
debug_print(<variable>) and hit return. For example, start and run
......
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