Commit 58fa012d authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Proofreading fixes from Chris Green <chris_e_green@yahoo.com>.

parent 12de6e26
......@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ read with the minibuffer).
To change the definition of an abbrev, just define a new definition.
When the abbrev has a prior definition, the abbrev definition commands
ask for confirmation for replacing it.
ask for confirmation before replacing it.
To remove an abbrev definition, give a negative argument to the abbrev
definition command: @kbd{C-u - C-x a g} or @kbd{C-u - C-x a l}. The
......@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ once. This command is effective even if Abbrev mode is not enabled.
@table @kbd
@item M-x list-abbrevs
Display a list of all abbrev definitions. With numeric argument, list
Display a list of all abbrev definitions. With a numeric argument, list
only local abbrevs.
@item M-x edit-abbrevs
Edit a list of abbrevs; you can add, alter or remove definitions.
......@@ -387,8 +387,8 @@ you are expanding.
@vindex dabbrev-case-fold-search
This feature is controlled by the variable
@code{dabbrev-case-fold-search}. If it is @code{t}, case is ignored in
this search; if @code{nil}, the word and the expansion must match in
case. If the value of @code{dabbrev-case-fold-search} is
this search; if it is @code{nil}, the word and the expansion must match
in case. If the value of @code{dabbrev-case-fold-search} is
@code{case-fold-search}, which is true by default, then the variable
@code{case-fold-search} controls whether to ignore case while searching
for expansions.
......@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ pattern.
@vindex dabbrev-case-fold-search
The variable @code{dabbrev-case-replace} controls whether to preserve
the case pattern of the abbrev. If it is @code{t}, the abbrev's case
pattern is preserved in most cases; if @code{nil}, the expansion is
pattern is preserved in most cases; if it is @code{nil}, the expansion is
always copied verbatim. If the value of @code{dabbrev-case-replace} is
@code{case-replace}, which is true by default, then the variable
@code{case-replace} controls whether to copy the expansion verbatim.
......
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ compilation errors occurred.
@table @kbd
@item M-x compile
Run a compiler asynchronously under Emacs, with error messages going to
@samp{*compilation*} buffer.
the @samp{*compilation*} buffer.
@item M-x grep
Run @code{grep} asynchronously under Emacs, with matching lines
listed in the buffer named @samp{*grep*}.
......@@ -161,9 +161,10 @@ Visit the locus of the error message that you click on.
@kindex C-x `
@findex next-error
You can visit the source for any particular error message by moving
point in @samp{*compilation*} to that error message and typing @key{RET}
(@code{compile-goto-error}). Or click @kbd{Mouse-2} on the error message;
you need not switch to the @samp{*compilation*} buffer first.
point in the @samp{*compilation*} buffer to that error message and
typing @key{RET} (@code{compile-goto-error}). Alternatively, you can
click @kbd{Mouse-2} on the error message; you need not switch to the
@samp{*compilation*} buffer first.
To parse the compiler error messages sequentially, type @kbd{C-x `}
(@code{next-error}). The character following the @kbd{C-x} is the
......@@ -284,24 +285,24 @@ to a particular debugger program.
@table @kbd
@item M-x gdb @key{RET} @var{file} @key{RET}
@findex gdb
Run GDB as a subprocess of Emacs. This command creates a buffer for
input and output to GDB, and switches to it. If a GDB buffer already
exists, it just switches to that buffer.
This command runs GDB as a subprocess of Emacs. It creates a buffer
for input and output to GDB, and switches to it. If a GDB buffer
already exists, it just switches to that buffer.
@item M-x dbx @key{RET} @var{file} @key{RET}
@findex dbx
Similar, but run DBX instead of GDB.
Similar, but runs DBX instead of GDB.
@item M-x xdb @key{RET} @var{file} @key{RET}
@findex xdb
@vindex gud-xdb-directories
Similar, but run XDB instead of GDB. Use the variable
Similar, but runs XDB instead of GDB. Use the variable
@code{gud-xdb-directories} to specify directories to search for source
files.
@item M-x sdb @key{RET} @var{file} @key{RET}
@findex sdb
Similar, but run SDB instead of GDB.
Similar, but runs SDB instead of GDB.
Some versions of SDB do not mention source file names in their
messages. When you use them, you need to have a valid tags table
......@@ -345,7 +346,7 @@ displayed in the marginal area of the Emacs window.} Moving point in
this buffer does not move the arrow.
You can start editing these source files at any time in the buffers
that were made to display them. The arrow is not part of the file's
that display them. The arrow is not part of the file's
text; it appears only on the screen. If you do modify a source file,
keep in mind that inserting or deleting lines will throw off the arrow's
positioning; GUD has no way of figuring out which line corresponded
......@@ -368,9 +369,9 @@ selecting stack frames, and for stepping through the program. These
commands are available both in the GUD buffer and globally, but with
different key bindings.
The breakpoint commands are usually used in source file buffers,
because that is the way to specify where to set or clear the breakpoint.
Here's the global command to set a breakpoint:
The breakpoint commands are normally used in source file buffers,
because that is the easiest way to specify where to set or clear the
breakpoint. Here's the global command to set a breakpoint:
@table @kbd
@item C-x @key{SPC}
......@@ -513,7 +514,7 @@ debugger interaction buffer:
This defines a command named @var{function} which sends
@var{cmdstring} to the debugger process, and gives it the documentation
string @var{docstring}. You can use the command thus defined in any
string @var{docstring}. You can then use the command thus defined in any
buffer. If @var{binding} is non-@code{nil}, @code{gud-def} also binds
the command to @kbd{C-c @var{binding}} in the GUD buffer's mode and to
@kbd{C-x C-a @var{binding}} generally.
......@@ -748,7 +749,7 @@ is @code{eval-region}. @kbd{M-x eval-region} parses the text of the
region as one or more Lisp expressions, evaluating them one by one.
@kbd{M-x eval-current-buffer} is similar but evaluates the entire
buffer. This is a reasonable way to install the contents of a file of
Lisp code that you are just ready to test. Later, as you find bugs and
Lisp code that you are ready to test. Later, as you find bugs and
change individual functions, use @kbd{C-M-x} on each function that you
change. This keeps the Lisp world in step with the source file.
......
......@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ ask you to report any bugs you find. @xref{Bugs}.
@item Button Down Event
A button down event is the kind of input event generated right away when
you press a mouse button. @xref{Mouse Buttons}.
you press down on a mouse button. @xref{Mouse Buttons}.
@item By Default
See `default.'
......@@ -255,11 +255,11 @@ The current line is a line point is on (@pxref{Point}).
@item Current Paragraph
The current paragraph is the paragraph that point is in. If point is
between paragraphs, the current paragraph is the one that follows point.
@xref{Paragraphs}.
between two paragraphs, the current paragraph is the one that follows
point. @xref{Paragraphs}.
@item Current Defun
The current defun is a defun (q.v.@:) that point is in. If point is
The current defun is the defun (q.v.@:) that point is in. If point is
between defuns, the current defun is the one that follows point.
@xref{Defuns}.
......@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ Deleting a file means erasing it from the file system.
@item Deletion of Messages
Deleting a message means flagging it to be eliminated from your mail
file. Until you expunge (q.v.@:) the Rmail file, you can still undelete
the messages you have deleted. @xref{Rmail Deletion}.
the messages you have flagged to be deleted. @xref{Rmail Deletion}.
@item Deletion of Windows
Deleting a window means eliminating it from the screen. Other windows
......@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ particular delimiter characters to reindent the line or insert one or
more newlines in addition to self-insertion.
@item End Of Line
End of line is a character or characters which signal an end of a text
End of line is a character or characters which signal the end of a text
line. On GNU and Unix systems, this is a newline (q.v.@:), but other
systems have other conventions. @xref{Coding Systems,end-of-line}.
Emacs can recognize several end-of-line conventions in files and convert
......@@ -519,7 +519,7 @@ tags (see `tags table'). @xref{Global Mark Ring}.
@item Global Substitution
Global substitution means replacing each occurrence of one string by
another string through a large amount of text. @xref{Replace}.
another string throughout a large amount of text. @xref{Replace}.
@item Global Variable
The global value of a variable (q.v.@:) takes effect in all buffers
......@@ -616,8 +616,9 @@ that someone else is already editing.
See `incremental search.'
@item Justification
Justification means adding extra spaces to lines of text to make them
come exactly to a specified width. @xref{Filling,Justification}.
Justification means adding extra spaces within lines of text to make
them align exactly to a specified width.
@xref{Filling,Justification}.
@item Keyboard Macro
Keyboard macros are a way of defining new Emacs commands from
......@@ -655,8 +656,8 @@ called yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Yanking}.
@item Killing
Killing means erasing text and saving it on the kill ring so it can be
yanked (q.v.@:) later. Some other systems call this ``cutting.''
Most Emacs commands to erase text do killing, as opposed to deletion
(q.v.@:). @xref{Killing}.
Most Emacs commands that erase text perform killing, as opposed to
deletion (q.v.@:). @xref{Killing}.
@item Killing a Job
Killing a job (such as, an invocation of Emacs) means making it cease
......@@ -932,7 +933,7 @@ Visiting a file that is write-protected also makes a read-only buffer.
@item Rectangle
A rectangle consists of the text in a given range of columns on a given
range of lines. Normally you specify a rectangle by putting point at
one corner and putting the mark at the opposite corner.
one corner and putting the mark at the diagonally opposite corner.
@xref{Rectangles}.
@item Recursive Editing Level
......@@ -967,7 +968,9 @@ digits. @xref{Regexps}.
@item Remote File
A remote file is a file that is stored on a system other than your own.
Emacs can access files on other computers provided that they are
connected to the same network as your machine. @xref{Remote Files}.
connected to the same network as your machine, and (obviously) that
you have a supported method to gain access to those files.
@xref{Remote Files}.
@item Repeat Count
See `numeric argument.'
......@@ -1061,7 +1064,7 @@ name. @xref{Expressions,Sexps}.
@item Simultaneous Editing
Simultaneous editing means two users modifying the same file at once.
Simultaneous editing if not detected can cause one user to lose his
Simultaneous editing, if not detected, can cause one user to lose his
work. Emacs detects all cases of simultaneous editing and warns one
of the users to investigate.
@xref{Interlocking,Interlocking,Simultaneous Editing}.
......@@ -1124,7 +1127,7 @@ Emacs does not make a termscript file unless you tell it to.
@xref{Bugs}.
@item Text
Two meanings (@pxref{Text}):
`Text' has two meanings (@pxref{Text}):
@itemize @bullet
@item
......
@c This is part of the Emacs manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1985, 86, 87, 93, 94, 95, 97, 2000
@c Copyright (C) 1985, 86, 87, 93, 94, 95, 97, 2000, 2001
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See file emacs.texi for copying conditions.
@node Help, Mark, M-x, Top
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@
Emacs provides extensive help features accessible through a single
character, @kbd{C-h}. @kbd{C-h} is a prefix key that is used only for
documentation-printing commands. The characters that you can type after
commands that display documentation. The characters that you can type after
@kbd{C-h} are called @dfn{help options}. One help option is @kbd{C-h};
that is how you ask for help about using @kbd{C-h}. To cancel, type
@kbd{C-g}. The function key @key{F1} is equivalent to @kbd{C-h}.
......@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ customization buffers and the like. @xref{Help Mode}.
@cindex searching documentation efficiently
@cindex looking for a subject in documentation
If you are looking for a certain feature, but don't know where
exactly it is documented, and aren't even sure what is the name of the
exactly it is documented, and aren't even sure of the name of the
related command or option, we recommend trying these methods. Usually
it is best to start with an apropos command, then try searching the
manual index, then finally look in the FAQ and the package keywords.
......@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ manual index, then finally look in the FAQ and the package keywords.
@item C-h a @var{topic} @key{RET}
This searches for commands whose names match @var{topic}, which should
be a regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}). Browse the buffer popped
up by Emacs, to find what you are looking for. @xref{Apropos}.
up by Emacs to find what you are looking for. @xref{Apropos}.
@item M-x apropos @key{RET} @var{topic} @key{RET}
This works like @kbd{C-h a}, but it also searches for user options and
......@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ Display a table of all key bindings in effect now, in this order: minor
mode bindings, major mode bindings, and global bindings
(@code{describe-bindings}).
@item C-h c @var{key}
Print the name of the command that @var{key} runs
Show the name of the command that will be run if @var{key} is typed
(@code{describe-key-briefly}). Here @kbd{c} stands for ``character.''
For more extensive information on @var{key}, use @kbd{C-h k}.
@item C-h f @var{function} @key{RET}
......@@ -133,33 +133,34 @@ Display a description of the last 100 characters you typed
@item C-h m
Display documentation of the current major mode (@code{describe-mode}).
@item C-h n
Display documentation of Emacs changes, most recent first
(@code{view-emacs-news}).
Display documentation of changes to Emacs and its packages, most
recent first (@code{view-emacs-news}).
@item C-h P
Display info on known problems with Emacs and possible workarounds
(@code{view-emacs-problems}).
@item C-h p
Find packages by topic keyword (@code{finder-by-keyword}).
@item C-h s
Display current contents of the syntax table, plus an explanation of
Display the current contents of the syntax table, plus an explanation of
what they mean (@code{describe-syntax}). @xref{Syntax}.
@item C-h t
Enter the Emacs interactive tutorial (@code{help-with-tutorial}).
@item C-h v @var{var} @key{RET}
Display the documentation of the Lisp variable @var{var}
Display the documentation for the Lisp variable @var{var}
(@code{describe-variable}).
@item C-h w @var{command} @key{RET}
Print which keys run the command named @var{command} (@code{where-is}).
Display the list of keys that will run the command named @var{command}
(@code{where-is}).
@item C-h C @var{coding} @key{RET}
Describe coding system @var{coding}
Describe a coding system @var{coding}
(@code{describe-coding-system}).
@item C-h C @key{RET}
Describe the coding systems currently in use.
@item C-h I @var{method} @key{RET}
Describe an input method (@code{describe-input-method}).
@item C-h L @var{language-env} @key{RET}
Describe information on the character sets, coding systems and input
methods used for language environment @var{language-env}
Display information on the character sets, coding systems and input
methods used for a language environment @var{language-env}
(@code{describe-language-environment}).
@item C-h C-c
Display the copying conditions for GNU Emacs.
......@@ -229,7 +230,7 @@ you may find that some of your favorite abbreviations that work in
among command names yet fail to be unique when other function names are
allowed.
The function name for @kbd{C-h f} to describe has a default which is
The name of the function that @kbd{C-h f} describes has a default which is
used if you type @key{RET} leaving the minibuffer empty. The default is
the function called by the innermost Lisp expression in the buffer around
point, @emph{provided} that is a valid, defined Lisp function name. For
......@@ -385,11 +386,12 @@ wp --- word processing.
@section Help for International Language Support
You can use the command @kbd{C-h L}
(@code{describe-language-environment}) to find out the support for a
specific language environment. @xref{Language Environments}. This
tells you which languages this language environment is useful for, and
lists the character sets, coding systems, and input methods that go with
it. It also shows some sample text to illustrate scripts.
(@code{describe-language-environment}) to find out information about
the support for a specific language environment. @xref{Language
Environments}. This tells you which languages this language
environment is useful for, and lists the character sets, coding
systems, and input methods that go with it. It also shows some sample
text to illustrate scripts.
The command @kbd{C-h h} (@code{view-hello-file}) displays the file
@file{etc/HELLO}, which shows how to say ``hello'' in many languages.
......@@ -405,8 +407,8 @@ the ones currently in use. @xref{Coding Systems}.
@node Help Mode
@section Help Mode Commands
Help buffers provide the commands of View mode (@pxref{Misc File
Ops}), plus a few special commands of their own.
Help buffers provide the same commands commands as the View mode
(@pxref{Misc File Ops}), plus a few special commands of their own.
@table @kbd
@item @key{SPC}
......@@ -451,7 +453,7 @@ previous cross reference (@code{help-previous-ref}).
@cindex on-line manuals
@kbd{C-h i} (@code{info}) runs the Info program, which is used for
browsing through structured documentation files. The entire Emacs manual
is available within Info. Eventually all the documentation of the GNU
is available within Info. Eventually all of the documentation of the GNU
system will be available. Type @kbd{h} after entering Info to run
a tutorial on using Info.
......@@ -499,7 +501,7 @@ mode.
@kbd{C-h b} (@code{describe-bindings}) and @kbd{C-h s}
(@code{describe-syntax}) present other information about the current
Emacs mode. @kbd{C-h b} displays a list of all the key bindings now in
effect; the local bindings defined by the current minor modes first,
effect, showing the local bindings defined by the current minor modes first,
then the local bindings defined by the current major mode, and finally
the global bindings (@pxref{Key Bindings}). @kbd{C-h s} displays the
contents of the syntax table, with explanations of each character's
......@@ -525,7 +527,7 @@ actually @kbd{C-M-h}, which marks a defun.)
@findex describe-project
@kindex C-h P
@findex view-emacs-problems
The other @kbd{C-h} options display various files of useful
The other @kbd{C-h} options display various files containing useful
information. @kbd{C-h C-w} displays the full details on the complete
absence of warranty for GNU Emacs. @kbd{C-h n} (@code{view-emacs-news})
displays the file @file{emacs/etc/NEWS}, which contains documentation on
......@@ -547,10 +549,10 @@ various situations with solutions or workarounds in many cases.
@section Help on Active Text and Tooltips
@cindex tooltips
@cindex ballon help
@cindex balloon help
When a region of text is ``active,'' so that you can select it with
the mouse or a key like @kbd{RET}, it often has associated help text.
Areas of the mode line are examples. This help will normally be
printed in the echo area when you move point into the active text. In
a window system you can display the help text as a ``tooltip.''
@xref{Tooltips}.
a window system you can display the help text as a ``tooltip''
(sometimes known as ``balloon help''). @xref{Tooltips}.
......@@ -12,22 +12,22 @@ adjust indentation.
@c WideCommands
@table @kbd
@item @key{TAB}
Indent current line ``appropriately'' in a mode-dependent fashion.
Indent the current line ``appropriately'' in a mode-dependent fashion.
@item @kbd{C-j}
Perform @key{RET} followed by @key{TAB} (@code{newline-and-indent}).
@item M-^
Merge two lines (@code{delete-indentation}). This would cancel out
the effect of @kbd{C-j}.
Merge the previous and the current line (@code{delete-indentation}).
This would cancel out the effect of @kbd{C-j}.
@item C-M-o
Split line at point; text on the line after point becomes a new line
indented to the same column that it now starts in (@code{split-line}).
Split the line at point; text on the line after point becomes a new line
indented to the same column where point is located (@code{split-line}).
@item M-m
Move (forward or back) to the first nonblank character on the current
line (@code{back-to-indentation}).
@item C-M-\
Indent several lines to same column (@code{indent-region}).
Indent several lines to the same column (@code{indent-region}).
@item C-x @key{TAB}
Shift block of lines rigidly right or left (@code{indent-rigidly}).
Shift a block of lines rigidly right or left (@code{indent-rigidly}).
@item M-i
Indent from point to the next prespecified tab stop column
(@code{tab-to-tab-stop}).
......@@ -52,8 +52,8 @@ knows about many aspects of C syntax.
indents to the next tab stop column. You can set the tab stops with
@kbd{M-x edit-tab-stops}.
Normally, @key{TAB} inserts a mix of tabs and spaces to indent lines.
@xref{Just Spaces}, for how to override that.
Normally, @key{TAB} inserts an optimal mix of tabs and spaces to
indent lines. @xref{Just Spaces}, for how to override that.
@menu
* Indentation Commands:: Various commands and techniques for indentation.
......
......@@ -47,11 +47,12 @@ deleting it from the buffer. When this happens, a message in the echo
area tells you what is happening.
The delete commands include @kbd{C-d} (@code{delete-char}) and
@key{DEL} (@code{delete-backward-char}), which delete only one character at
a time, and those commands that delete only spaces or newlines. Commands
that can destroy significant amounts of nontrivial data generally kill.
The commands' names and individual descriptions use the words @samp{kill}
and @samp{delete} to say which they do.
@key{DEL} (@code{delete-backward-char}), which delete only one
character at a time, and those commands that delete only spaces or
newlines. Commands that can destroy significant amounts of nontrivial
data generally do a kill operation instead. The commands' names and
individual descriptions use the words @samp{kill} and @samp{delete} to
say which kind of operation they perform.
@cindex Delete Selection mode
@cindex mode, Delete Selection
......@@ -132,7 +133,7 @@ should be.
Why do we say ``or it should be''? When Emacs starts up using a
window system, it determines automatically which key or keys should be
equivalent to @key{DEL}. So the @key{BACKSPACE} and/or @key{DELETE}
equivalent to @key{DEL}. As a result, @key{BACKSPACE} and/or @key{DELETE}
keys normally do the right things. But in some unusual cases Emacs
gets the wrong information from the system. If these keys don't do
what they ought to do, you need to tell Emacs which key to use for
......@@ -144,7 +145,7 @@ keyboard really has, so it follows a uniform plan which may or may not
fit your keyboard. The uniform plan is that the ASCII @key{DEL}
character deletes, and the ASCII @key{BS} (backspace) character asks
for help (it is the same as @kbd{C-h}). If this is not right for your
keyboard, if you find that the key which ought to delete backwards
keyboard, i.e.@: if you find that the key which ought to delete backwards
enters Help instead, see @ref{DEL Gets Help}.
@kindex M-\
......@@ -157,7 +158,7 @@ characters: spaces, tabs and newlines. @kbd{M-\}
characters before and after point. @kbd{M-@key{SPC}}
(@code{just-one-space}) does likewise but leaves a single space after
point, regardless of the number of spaces that existed previously (even
zero).
if there were none before).
@kbd{C-x C-o} (@code{delete-blank-lines}) deletes all blank lines
after the current line. If the current line is blank, it deletes all
......@@ -192,7 +193,7 @@ of the line, you can be sure @kbd{C-k} will kill the newline.
When @kbd{C-k} is given a positive argument, it kills that many lines
and the newlines that follow them (however, text on the current line
before point is spared). With a negative argument @minus{}@var{n}, it
before point is not killed). With a negative argument @minus{}@var{n}, it
kills @var{n} lines preceding the current line (together with the text
on the current line before point). Thus, @kbd{C-u - 2 C-k} at the front
of a line kills the two previous lines.
......@@ -343,8 +344,9 @@ This is a line @point{}of sample text.
with point shown by @point{}. If you type @kbd{M-d M-@key{DEL} M-d
M-@key{DEL}}, killing alternately forward and backward, you end up with
@samp{a line of sample} as one entry in the kill ring, and @samp{This
is@ @ text.} in the buffer. (Note the double space, which you can clean
up with @kbd{M-@key{SPC}} or @kbd{M-q}.)
is@ @ text.} in the buffer. (Note the double space between @samp{is}
and @samp{text}, which you can clean up with @kbd{M-@key{SPC}} or
@kbd{M-q}.)
Another way to kill the same text is to move back two words with
@kbd{M-b M-b}, then kill all four words forward with @kbd{C-u M-d}.
......@@ -390,7 +392,7 @@ yank'' pointer moves to the newly made entry at the front of the ring.
text in the buffer changes to match. Enough @kbd{M-y} commands can move
the pointer to any entry in the ring, so you can get any entry into the
buffer. Eventually the pointer reaches the end of the ring; the next
@kbd{M-y} moves it to the first entry again.
@kbd{M-y} loops back around to the first entry again.
@kbd{M-y} moves the ``last yank'' pointer around the ring, but it does
not change the order of the entries in the ring, which always runs from
......@@ -444,15 +446,15 @@ scattered pieces of text into a buffer or into a file.
@table @kbd
@item M-x append-to-buffer
Append region to contents of specified buffer.
Append region to the contents of specified buffer.
@item M-x prepend-to-buffer
Prepend region to contents of specified buffer.
Prepend region to the contents of specified buffer.
@item M-x copy-to-buffer
Copy region into specified buffer, deleting that buffer's old contents.
Copy region into a specified buffer, deleting that buffer's old contents.
@item M-x insert-buffer
Insert contents of specified buffer into current buffer at point.
Insert the contents of specified buffer into current buffer at point.
@item M-x append-to-file
Append region to contents of specified file, at the end.
Append region to the contents of specified file, at the end.
@end table
To accumulate text into a buffer, use @kbd{M-x append-to-buffer}.
......@@ -461,7 +463,7 @@ buffer specified. If you specify a nonexistent buffer,
@code{append-to-buffer} creates the buffer. The text is inserted
wherever point is in that buffer. If you have been using the buffer for
editing, the copied text goes into the middle of the text of the buffer,
wherever point happens to be in it.
starting from wherever point happens to be at that moment.
Point in that buffer is left at the end of the copied text, so
successive uses of @code{append-to-buffer} accumulate the text in the
......@@ -474,7 +476,7 @@ a buffer, then point is always at the end.
@kbd{M-x prepend-to-buffer} is just like @code{append-to-buffer}
except that point in the other buffer is left before the copied text, so
successive prependings add text in reverse order. @kbd{M-x
copy-to-buffer} is similar except that any existing text in the other
copy-to-buffer} is similar, except that any existing text in the other
buffer is deleted, so the buffer is left containing just the text newly
copied into it.
......@@ -512,7 +514,7 @@ text into or out of such formats.
When you must specify a rectangle for a command to work on, you do it
by putting the mark at one corner and point at the opposite corner. The
rectangle thus specified is called the @dfn{region-rectangle} because
you control it in about the same way the region is controlled. But
you control it in much the same way as the region is controlled. But
remember that a given combination of point and mark values can be
interpreted either as a region or as a rectangle, depending on the
command that uses them.
......@@ -548,8 +550,8 @@ Replace rectangle contents with @var{string} on each line.
Insert @var{string} on each line of the rectangle.
@end table
The rectangle operations fall into two classes: commands deleting and
inserting rectangles, and commands for blank rectangles.
The rectangle operations fall into two classes: commands for
deleting and inserting rectangles, and commands for blank rectangles.
@kindex C-x r k
@kindex C-x r d
......@@ -560,7 +562,7 @@ discard the text (delete it) or save it as the ``last killed''
rectangle. The commands for these two ways are @kbd{C-x r d}
(@code{delete-rectangle}) and @kbd{C-x r k} (@code{kill-rectangle}). In
either case, the portion of each line that falls inside the rectangle's
boundaries is deleted, causing following text (if any) on the line to
boundaries is deleted, causing any following text on the line to
move left into the gap.
Note that ``killing'' a rectangle is not killing in the usual sense; the
......@@ -575,9 +577,9 @@ commands have to be used and yank-popping is hard to make sense of.
(@code{yank-rectangle}). Yanking a rectangle is the opposite of killing
one. Point specifies where to put the rectangle's upper left corner.
The rectangle's first line is inserted there, the rectangle's second
line is inserted at a position one line vertically down, and so on. The
number of lines affected is determined by the height of the saved
rectangle.
line is inserted at the same horizontal, but one line vertically down,
and so on. The number of lines affected is determined by the height of
the saved rectangle.
You can convert single-column lists into double-column lists using
rectangle killing and yanking; kill the second half of the list as a
......
......@@ -31,16 +31,17 @@ how comments are to be delimited. Many major modes redefine the
syntactical properties of characters appearing in the buffer.
@xref{Syntax}.
The major modes fall into three major groups. Lisp mode (which has
several variants), C mode, Fortran mode and others are for specific
programming languages. Text mode, Nroff mode, SGML mode, @TeX{} mode
and Outline mode are for normal text, plain or marked up. The remaining
major modes are not intended for use on users' files; they are used in
buffers created for specific purposes by Emacs, such as Dired mode for
buffers made by Dired (@pxref{Dired}), Mail mode for buffers made by
@kbd{C-x m} (@pxref{Sending Mail}), and Shell mode for buffers used for
communicating with an inferior shell process (@pxref{Interactive
Shell}).
The major modes fall into three major groups. The first group
contains Lisp mode (which has several variants), C mode, Fortran mode
and others. These modes are for specific programming languages. The
second group contains Text mode, Nroff mode, SGML mode, @TeX{} mode
and Outline mode. These modes are for normal text, plain or marked
up. The remaining major modes are not intended for use on users'
files; they are used in buffers created for specific purposes by
Emacs, such as Dired mode for buffers made by Dired (@pxref{Dired}),
Mail mode for buffers made by @kbd{C-x m} (@pxref{Sending Mail}), and
Shell mode for buffers used for communicating with an inferior shell
process (@pxref{Interactive Shell}).
Most programming-language major modes specify that only blank lines
separate paragraphs. This is to make the paragraph commands useful.
......@@ -88,8 +89,8 @@ or this form,
For example, one element normally found in the list has the form
@code{(@t{"\\.c\\'"} . c-mode)}, and it is responsible for selecting C
mode for files whose names end in @file{.c}. (Note that @samp{\\} is
needed in Lisp syntax to include a @samp{\} in the string, which is
needed to suppress the special meaning of @samp{.} in regexps.) If the
needed in Lisp syntax to include a @samp{\} in the string, which must
be used to suppress the special meaning of @samp{.} in regexps.) If the
element has the form @code{(@var{regexp} @var{mode-function}
@var{flag})} and @var{flag} is non-@code{nil}, then after calling
@var{mode-function}, the suffix that matched @var{regexp} is discarded
......@@ -106,7 +107,7 @@ mode name should appear in this line both preceded and followed by
@noindent
tells Emacs to use Lisp mode. Such an explicit specification overrides
any defaulting based on the file name. Note how the semicolon is used
any defaults based on the file name. Note how the semicolon is used
to make Lisp treat this line as a comment.
Another format of mode specification is
......@@ -158,7 +159,7 @@ mode is taken from the previously current buffer.
mode Emacs would choose automatically: use the command @kbd{M-x
normal-mode} to do this. This is the same function that
@code{find-file} calls to choose the major mode. It also processes
the file's local variables list if any.
the file's local variables list (if any).
@vindex change-major-mode-with-file-name
The commands @kbd{C-x C-w} and @code{set-visited-file-name} change to
......
......@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ use keyboard commands to set the mark. @xref{Mouse Commands}.
@findex exchange-point-and-mark
Ordinary terminals have only one cursor, so there is no way for Emacs
to show you where the mark is located. You have to remember. The usual
solution to this problem is to set the mark and then use it soon, before
solution to this problem is to set the mark and then use it before
you forget where it is. Alternatively, you can see where the mark is
with the command @kbd{C-x C-x} (@code{exchange-point-and-mark}) which
puts the mark where point was and point where the mark was. The extent
......@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@ reactivates the mark.
@kbd{C-x C-x} is also useful when you are satisfied with the position
of point but want to move the other end of the region (where the mark
is); do @kbd{C-x C-x} to put point at that end of the region, and then
move it. A second use of @kbd{C-x C-x}, if necessary, puts the mark at
move it. Using @kbd{C-x C-x} a second time, if necessary, puts the mark at
the new position with point back at its original position.
For more facilities that allow you to go to previously set marks, see
......@@ -155,8 +155,8 @@ the mode.
@itemize @bullet
@item
To set the mark, type @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} (@code{set-mark-command}).
This makes the mark active; as you move point, you will see the region
highlighting grow and shrink.
This makes the mark active; as you move point, you will see the
highlighted region grow and shrink.
@item