Commit 5b85892b authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Clean up delete vs kill explanation.

Explain both can be undone.
parent 46f6a258
......@@ -84,9 +84,10 @@ time, so it would be of great benefit if you learn them now.
>> Move into the line with C-f's and then up with C-p's.
See what C-p does when the cursor is in the middle of the line.
Each text line ends with a Newline character, which serves to separate
it from the following line. The last line in your file ought to have
a Newline at the end (but Emacs does not require it to have one).
Each line of text ends with a Newline character, which serves to
separate it from the following line. The last line in your file ought
to have a Newline at the end (but Emacs does not require it to have
one).
>> Try to C-b at the beginning of a line. It should move to
the end of the previous line. This is because it moves back
......@@ -368,18 +369,13 @@ C-w. That kills all the text between the two positions.
>> Type C-w. This will kill the text starting from the Y,
and ending just before the n.
When you delete more than one character at a time, Emacs saves the
deleted text so that you can bring it back. Bringing back killed text
is called "yanking". You can yank the killed text either at the same
place where it was killed, or at some other place in the text. You
can yank the text several times in order to make multiple copies of
it. The command to yank is C-y.
Note that the difference between "Killing" and "Deleting" something is
that "Killed" things can be yanked back, and "Deleted" things cannot.
Generally, the commands that can remove a lot of text save the text,
while the commands that delete just one character, or just blank lines
and spaces, do not save the deleted text.
The difference between "killing" and "deleting" is that "killed" text
can be reinserted, whereas "deleted" things cannot be reinserted.
Reinsertion of killed text is called "yanking". Generally, the
commands that can remove a lot of text kill the text (they set up so
that you can yank the text), while the commands that remove just one
character, or just blank lines and spaces, do deletion (so you cannot
yank that text).
>> Move the cursor to the beginning of a line which is not empty.
Then type C-k to kill the text on that line.
......@@ -392,15 +388,20 @@ treats a numeric argument specially: it kills that many lines AND
their contents. This is not mere repetition. C-u 2 C-k kills two
lines and their newlines; typing C-k twice would not do that.
To retrieve the last killed text and put it where the cursor currently
is, type C-y.
Bringing back killed text is called "yanking". (Think of it as
yanking back, or pulling back, some text that was taken away.) You
can yank the killed text either at the same place where it was killed,
or at some other place in the buffer, or even in a different file.
You can yank the text several times, which makes multiple copies of
it.
The command for yanking is C-y. It reinserts the last killed text,
at the current cursor position.
>> Try it; type C-y to yank the text back.
Think of C-y as if you were yanking something back that someone took
away from you. Notice that if you do several C-k's in a row, all of
the killed text is saved together, so that one C-y will yank all of
the lines.
If you do several C-k's in a row, all of the killed text is saved
together, so that one C-y will yank all of the lines at once.
>> Do this now, type C-k several times.
......@@ -457,6 +458,10 @@ by typing / while holding down CONTROL.
A numeric argument to C-_ or C-x u acts as a repeat count.
You can undo deletion of text just as you can undo killing of text.
The distinction between killing something and deleting it affects
whether you can yank it with C-y; it makes no difference for undo.
* FILES
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