Commit 603a0716 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Improve the documentation of M-n for entering file names

* lisp/files.el (find-file, find-file-other-window)
(find-file-other-frame): Mention file-name-at-point-functions in
the doc string.  Reported by Florian Weimer <fw@deneb.enyo.de> in
http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/emacs-devel/2017-11/msg00224.html.

* doc/emacs/mini.texi (Minibuffer History): Document
file-name-at-point-functions and its effect on M-n when typing
file names in the minibuffer.
* doc/emacs/files.texi (File Names):
* doc/emacs/mini.texi (Minibuffer File): Add a cross-reference to
"Minibuffer History", where special features of M-n regarding
files are described.
parent 72f813fb
......@@ -63,6 +63,9 @@ completing up to a nonexistent file name, Emacs prints
@samp{[Confirm]} and you must type a second @key{RET} to confirm.
@xref{Completion Exit}, for details.
Minibuffer history commands offer some special features for reading
file names, see @ref{Minibuffer History}.
@cindex default directory
@vindex default-directory
@vindex insert-default-directory
......
......@@ -89,7 +89,10 @@ the default directory. If you now type @kbd{buffer.c} as input, that
specifies the file @file{/u2/emacs/src/buffer.c}. @xref{File Names},
for information about the default directory.
You can specify the parent directory with @file{..}:
Alternative defaults for the file name you may want are available by
typing @kbd{M-n}, see @ref{Minibuffer History}.
You can specify a file in the parent directory with @file{..}:
@file{/a/b/../foo.el} is equivalent to @file{/a/foo.el}.
Alternatively, you can use @kbd{M-@key{DEL}} to kill directory names
backwards (@pxref{Words}).
......@@ -609,8 +612,6 @@ Move to a later item in the minibuffer history that matches
@kindex M-p @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex M-n @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex UP @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex DOWN @r{(minibuffer history)}
@findex next-history-element
@findex previous-history-element
While in the minibuffer, @kbd{M-p} (@code{previous-history-element})
......@@ -627,8 +628,25 @@ typed @kbd{M-p}), Emacs tries fetching from a list of default
arguments: values that you are likely to enter. You can think of this
as moving through the ``future history''.
@cindex future history for file names
@cindex minibuffer defaults for file names
@vindex file-name-at-point-functions
The ``future history'' for file names includes several possible
alternatives you may find useful, such as the file name or the URL at
point in the current buffer. The defaults put into the ``future
history'' in this case are controlled by the functions mentioned in
the value of the option @code{file-name-at-point-functions}. By
default, its value invokes the @code{ffap} package (@pxref{FFAP}),
which tries to guess the default file or URL from the text around
point. To disable this guessing, customize the option to a @code{nil}
value, then the ``future history'' of file names will include only the
file, if any, visited by the current buffer, and the default
directory.
@findex previous-line-or-history-element
@findex next-line-or-history-element
@kindex UP @r{(minibuffer history)}
@kindex DOWN @r{(minibuffer history)}
The arrow keys @kbd{@key{UP}} and @kbd{@key{DOWN}} work like
@kbd{M-p} and @kbd{M-n}, but if the current history item is longer
than a single line, they allow you to move to the previous or next
......
......@@ -1560,7 +1560,15 @@ Switch to a buffer visiting file FILENAME,
creating one if none already exists.
Interactively, the default if you just type RET is the current directory,
but the visited file name is available through the minibuffer history:
type M-n to pull it into the minibuffer.
type \\[next-history-element] to pull it into the minibuffer.
The first time \\[next-history-element] is used after Emacs prompts for
the file name, the result is affected by `file-name-at-point-functions',
which by default try to guess the file name by looking at point in the
current buffer. Customize the value of `file-name-at-point-functions'
or set it to nil, if you want only the visited file name and the
current directory to be available on first \\[next-history-element]
request.
You can visit files on remote machines by specifying something
like /ssh:SOME_REMOTE_MACHINE:FILE for the file name. You can
......@@ -1591,7 +1599,15 @@ an existing one. See the function `display-buffer'.
Interactively, the default if you just type RET is the current directory,
but the visited file name is available through the minibuffer history:
type M-n to pull it into the minibuffer.
type \\[next-history-element] to pull it into the minibuffer.
The first time \\[next-history-element] is used after Emacs prompts for
the file name, the result is affected by `file-name-at-point-functions',
which by default try to guess the file name by looking at point in the
current buffer. Customize the value of `file-name-at-point-functions'
or set it to nil, if you want only the visited file name and the
current directory to be available on first \\[next-history-element]
request.
Interactively, or if WILDCARDS is non-nil in a call from Lisp,
expand wildcards (if any) and visit multiple files."
......@@ -1615,7 +1631,15 @@ an existing one. See the function `display-buffer'.
Interactively, the default if you just type RET is the current directory,
but the visited file name is available through the minibuffer history:
type M-n to pull it into the minibuffer.
type \\[next-history-element] to pull it into the minibuffer.
The first time \\[next-history-element] is used after Emacs prompts for
the file name, the result is affected by `file-name-at-point-functions',
which by default try to guess the file name by looking at point in the
current buffer. Customize the value of `file-name-at-point-functions'
or set it to nil, if you want only the visited file name and the
current directory to be available on first \\[next-history-element]
request.
Interactively, or if WILDCARDS is non-nil in a call from Lisp,
expand wildcards (if any) and visit multiple files."
......
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