Commit 60a96371 authored by Gerd Moellmann's avatar Gerd Moellmann
Browse files

*** empty log message ***

parent d23ee514
2000-05-20 Karl Eichwalder <ke@suse.de>
2000-05-23 Gerd Moellmann <gerd@gnu.org>
* cmdargs.texi, custom.texi, dired-x.texi, ediff.texi,
entering.texi, files.texi, frames.texi, misc.texi, msdog.texi,
mule.texi, programs.texi, rmail.texi, sending.texi, text.texi,
trouble.texi: Fix markup; mostly replace @code with @env.
* ebrowse.texi: Use @command. Change title page.
2000-05-23 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@is.elta.co.il>
* ebrowse.texi: Various markup and index fixes. Changes for
MS-DOS.
2000-05-11 Gerd Moellmann <gerd@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ Visit @var{file} using @code{find-file}, then go to line number
Load a Lisp library named @var{file} with the function @code{load}.
@xref{Lisp Libraries}. The library can be found either in the current
directory, or in the Emacs library search path as specified
with @code{EMACSLOADPATH} (@pxref{General Variables}).
with @env{EMACSLOADPATH} (@pxref{General Variables}).
@item -f @var{function}
@itemx --funcall=@var{function}
......@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ the initial Emacs frame.
@item -nw
@itemx --no-windows
Don't communicate directly with X, disregarding the @code{DISPLAY}
Don't communicate directly with X, disregarding the @env{DISPLAY}
environment variable even if it is set.
@need 3000
......@@ -186,10 +186,10 @@ Enable the Emacs Lisp debugger for errors in the init file.
Set up to do almost everything with single-byte buffers and strings.
All buffers and strings are unibyte unless you (or a Lisp program)
explicitly ask for a multibyte buffer or string. Setting the
environment variable @code{EMACS_UNIBYTE} has the same effect.
environment variable @env{EMACS_UNIBYTE} has the same effect.
@item --multibyte
Inhibit the effect of @code{EMACS_UNIBYTE}, so that Emacs
Inhibit the effect of @env{EMACS_UNIBYTE}, so that Emacs
uses multibyte characters by default, as usual.
@end table
......@@ -240,7 +240,7 @@ within the shell that is the parent of the Emacs job. This is why
@code{edit} is an alias rather than a program or a shell script. It is
not possible to implement a resumption command that could be run from
other subjobs of the shell; no way to define a command that could be
made the value of @code{EDITOR}, for example. Therefore, this feature
made the value of @env{EDITOR}, for example. Therefore, this feature
does not take the place of the Emacs Server feature (@pxref{Emacs
Server}).
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ conventional to use upper case letters only.
Because environment variables come from the operating system there is no
general way to set them; it depends on the operating system and
especially the shell that you are using. For example, here's how to set
the environment variable @code{ORGANIZATION} to @samp{not very much}
the environment variable @env{ORGANIZATION} to @samp{not very much}
using bash:
@example
......@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ the X documentation for more information.
@node General Variables
@appendixsubsec General Variables
@table @code
@table @env
@item AUTHORCOPY
The name of a file used to archive news articles posted with the @sc{gnus}
package.
......@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ overrides the setting in @file{paths.h} when Emacs was built.
The location of Emacs-specific binaries. Setting this variable
overrides the setting in @file{paths.h} when Emacs was built.
@item ESHELL
Used for shell-mode to override the @code{SHELL} environment variable.
Used for shell-mode to override the @env{SHELL} environment variable.
@item HISTFILE
The name of the file that shell commands are saved in between logins.
This variable defaults to @file{~/.history} if you use (t)csh as shell,
......@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ entries in @code{locale-language-names},
environment and coding system. The first of these environment variables
with a nonempty value specifies the locale.
@item LOGNAME
The user's login name. See also @code{USER}.
The user's login name. See also @env{USER}.
@item MAIL
The name of the user's system mail inbox.
@item MAILRC
......@@ -394,7 +394,7 @@ set unless Emacs is run in batch mode. On MS-DOS, it defaults to
handles the machine's own display.
@item TERMCAP
The name of the termcap library file describing how to program the
terminal specified by the @code{TERM} variable. This defaults to
terminal specified by the @env{TERM} variable. This defaults to
@file{/etc/termcap}.
@item TMPDIR
Used by the Emerge package as a prefix for temporary files.
......@@ -403,7 +403,7 @@ This specifies the current time zone and possibly also daylight savings
information. On MS-DOS, the default is based on country code; see the
file @file{msdos.c} for details.
@item USER
The user's login name. See also @code{LOGNAME}. On MS-DOS, this
The user's login name. See also @env{LOGNAME}. On MS-DOS, this
defaults to @samp{root}.
@item VERSION_CONTROL
Used to initialize the @code{version-control} variable (@pxref{Backup
......@@ -415,13 +415,13 @@ Names}).
These variables are used only on particular configurations:
@table @code
@table @env
@item COMSPEC
On MS-DOS, the name of the command interpreter to use. This is used to
make a default value for the @code{SHELL} environment variable.
make a default value for the @env{SHELL} environment variable.
@item NAME
On MS-DOS, this variable defaults to the value of the @code{USER}
On MS-DOS, this variable defaults to the value of the @env{USER}
variable.
@item TEMP
......@@ -455,9 +455,9 @@ Used when initializing the Sun windows system.
@node Display X
@appendixsec Specifying the Display Name
@cindex display name (X Windows)
@cindex @code{DISPLAY} environment variable
@cindex @env{DISPLAY} environment variable
The environment variable @code{DISPLAY} tells all X clients, including
The environment variable @env{DISPLAY} tells all X clients, including
Emacs, where to display their windows. Its value is set up by default
in ordinary circumstances, when you start an X server and run jobs
locally. Occasionally you may need to specify the display yourself; for
......@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ window displayed at their local terminal. You might need to use login
to another system because the files you want to edit are there, or
because the Emacs executable file you want to run is there.
The syntax of the @code{DISPLAY} environment variable is
The syntax of the @env{DISPLAY} environment variable is
@samp{@var{host}:@var{display}.@var{screen}}, where @var{host} is the
host name of the X Window System server machine, @var{display} is an
arbitrarily-assigned number that distinguishes your server (X terminal)
......@@ -481,10 +481,10 @@ included, @var{screen} is usually zero.
For example, if your host is named @samp{glasperle} and your server is
the first (or perhaps the only) server listed in the configuration, your
@code{DISPLAY} is @samp{glasperle:0.0}.
@env{DISPLAY} is @samp{glasperle:0.0}.
You can specify the display name explicitly when you run Emacs, either
by changing the @code{DISPLAY} variable, or with the option @samp{-d
by changing the @env{DISPLAY} variable, or with the option @samp{-d
@var{display}} or @samp{--display=@var{display}}. Here is an example:
@smallexample
......
......@@ -2286,7 +2286,7 @@ library. @xref{Hooks}.
@node Find Init
@subsection How Emacs Finds Your Init File
Normally Emacs uses the environment variable @code{HOME} to find
Normally Emacs uses the environment variable @env{HOME} to find
@file{.emacs}; that's what @samp{~} means in a file name. But if you
have done @code{su}, Emacs tries to find your own @file{.emacs}, not
that of the user you are currently pretending to be. The idea is
......@@ -2294,9 +2294,9 @@ that you should get your own editor customizations even if you are
running as the super user.
More precisely, Emacs first determines which user's init file to use.
It gets the user name from the environment variables @code{LOGNAME} and
@code{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID.
If that user name matches the real user-ID, then Emacs uses @code{HOME};
It gets the user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID.
If that user name matches the real user-ID, then Emacs uses @env{HOME};
otherwise, it looks up the home directory corresponding to that user
name in the system's data base of users.
@c LocalWords: backtab
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ you don't like).
Ediff even understands multi-file patches and can apply them interactively!
(Ediff can recognize multi-file patches only if they are in the context
format or GNU unified format. All other patches are treated as 1-file
patches. Ediff is [hopefully] using the same algorithm as @file{patch} to
patches. Ediff is [hopefully] using the same algorithm as @command{patch} to
determine which files need to be patched.)
Ediff is aware of version control, which lets you compare
......@@ -222,7 +222,7 @@ the case. To avoid this extra prompt, you can invoke this command with a
prefix argument. With an odd prefix argument, Ediff assumes the patch
is in a file; with an even argument, a buffer is assumed.
Note that @code{ediff-patch-file} will actually use the @file{patch}
Note that @code{ediff-patch-file} will actually use the @command{patch}
utility to change the the original files on disk. This is not that
dangerous, since you will always have the original contents of the file
saved in another file that has the extension @file{.orig}.
......@@ -249,7 +249,7 @@ appears in some other buffer that has the name ending with @emph{_patched}.
This function would refuse to apply a multifile patch to a buffer. Use
@code{ediff-patch-file} for that (and when you want the original file to be
modified by the @file{patch} utility).
modified by the @command{patch} utility).
Since the patch might be in a buffer or a file, you will be asked which is
the case. To avoid this extra prompt, you can invoke this command with a
......@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ the VMS version of @code{diff}.
The functions @code{ediff-files}, @code{ediff-buffers},
@code{ediff-files3}, @code{ediff-buffers3} first display the coarse,
line-based difference regions, as reported by the @file{diff} program. The
line-based difference regions, as reported by the @command{diff} program. The
total number of difference regions and the current difference number are
always displayed in the mode line of the control window.
......@@ -446,9 +446,9 @@ Scrolls buffers to the right.
@item wd
Saves the output from the diff utility, for further reference.
With prefix argument, saves the plain output from @file{diff} (see
With prefix argument, saves the plain output from @command{diff} (see
@code{ediff-diff-program} and @code{ediff-diff-options}). Without the
argument, it saves customized @file{diff} output (see
argument, it saves customized @command{diff} output (see
@code{ediff-custom-diff-program} and @code{ediff-custom-diff-options}), if
it is available.
......@@ -669,7 +669,7 @@ Runs @code{ediff-custom-diff-program} on the variants and displays the
buffer containing the output. This is useful when you must send the output
to your Mom.
With a prefix argument, displays the plain @file{diff} output.
With a prefix argument, displays the plain @command{diff} output.
@xref{Patch and Diff Programs}, for details.
@item R
......@@ -980,7 +980,7 @@ change this variable.
@cindex Multi-file patches
A multi-file patch is a concatenated output of several runs of the Unix
@file{diff} command (some versions of @file{diff} let you create a
@command{diff} command (some versions of @command{diff} let you create a
multi-file patch in just one run). Ediff facilitates creation of
multi-file patches as follows. If you are in a session group buffer
created in response to @code{ediff-directories} or
......@@ -988,7 +988,7 @@ created in response to @code{ediff-directories} or
desired Ediff sessions and then type @kbd{P} to create a
multi-file patch of those marked sessions.
Ediff will then display a buffer containing the patch.
The patch is generated by invoking @file{diff} on all marked individual
The patch is generated by invoking @command{diff} on all marked individual
sessions (represented by files) and session groups (represented by
directories). Ediff will also recursively descend into any @emph{unmarked}
session group and will search for marked sessions there. In this way, you
......@@ -1762,7 +1762,7 @@ output from @code{diff} in your preferred format, which is specified via
the above two variables.
The output generated by @code{ediff-custom-diff-program} (which doesn't
even have to be a standard-style @file{diff}!)@: is not used by Ediff. It is
even have to be a standard-style @command{diff}!)@: is not used by Ediff. It is
provided exclusively so that you can
refer to
it later, send it over email, etc. For instance, after reviewing the
......
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
@cindex entering Emacs
@cindex starting Emacs
The usual way to invoke Emacs is with the shell command @samp{emacs}.
The usual way to invoke Emacs is with the shell command @command{emacs}.
Emacs clears the screen and then displays an initial help message and
copyright notice. Some operating systems discard all type-ahead when
Emacs starts up; they give Emacs no way to prevent this. Therefore, it
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ is advisable to wait until Emacs clears the screen before typing your
first editing command.
If you run Emacs from a shell window under the X Window System, run it
in the background with @samp{emacs&}. This way, Emacs does not tie up
in the background with @command{emacs&}. This way, Emacs does not tie up
the shell window, so you can use that to run other shell commands while
Emacs operates its own X windows. You can begin typing Emacs commands
as soon as you direct your keyboard input to the Emacs frame.
......@@ -86,12 +86,12 @@ Kill Emacs (@code{save-buffers-kill-emacs}).
@findex suspend-emacs
To suspend Emacs, type @kbd{C-z} (@code{suspend-emacs}). This takes
you back to the shell from which you invoked Emacs. You can resume
Emacs with the shell command @samp{%emacs} in most common shells.
Emacs with the shell command @command{%emacs} in most common shells.
On systems that do not support suspending programs, @kbd{C-z} starts
an inferior shell that communicates directly with the terminal.
Emacs waits until you exit the subshell. (The way to do that is
probably with @kbd{C-d} or @samp{exit}, but it depends on which shell
probably with @kbd{C-d} or @command{exit}, but it depends on which shell
you use.) The only way on these systems to get back to the shell from
which Emacs was run (to log out, for example) is to kill Emacs.
......
......@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ first slash in the double slash; the result is @samp{/x1/rms/foo}.
@samp{$} in a file name is used to substitute environment variables.
For example, if you have used the shell command @samp{export
FOO=rms/hacks} to set up an environment variable named @code{FOO}, then
FOO=rms/hacks} to set up an environment variable named @env{FOO}, then
you can use @file{/u/$FOO/test.c} or @file{/u/$@{FOO@}/test.c} as an
abbreviation for @file{/u/rms/hacks/test.c}. The environment variable
name consists of all the alphanumeric characters after the @samp{$};
......@@ -543,8 +543,8 @@ control the making of backups for that buffer's file. For example,
Rmail mode locally sets @code{version-control} to @code{never} to make sure
that there is only one backup for an Rmail file. @xref{Locals}.
@cindex @code{VERSION_CONTROL} environment variable
If you set the environment variable @code{VERSION_CONTROL}, to tell
@cindex @env{VERSION_CONTROL} environment variable
If you set the environment variable @env{VERSION_CONTROL}, to tell
various GNU utilities what to do with backup files, Emacs also obeys the
environment variable by setting the Lisp variable @code{version-control}
accordingly at startup. If the environment variable's value is @samp{t}
......@@ -2079,13 +2079,13 @@ file at any time. However, there are ways to restrict this, resulting
in behavior that resembles locking.
@cindex CVSREAD environment variable (CVS)
For one thing, you can set the @code{CVSREAD} environment variable to
For one thing, you can set the @env{CVSREAD} environment variable to
an arbitrary value. If this variable is defined, CVS makes your work
files read-only by default. In Emacs, you must type @kbd{C-x C-q} to
make the file writeable, so that editing works in fact similar as if
locking was used. Note however, that no actual locking is performed, so
several users can make their files writeable at the same time. When
setting @code{CVSREAD} for the first time, make sure to check out all
setting @env{CVSREAD} for the first time, make sure to check out all
your modules anew, so that the file protections are set correctly.
@cindex cvs watch feature
......
......@@ -443,7 +443,7 @@ speedbar for it.
A single Emacs can talk to more than one X Windows display.
Initially, Emacs uses just one display---the one specified with the
@code{DISPLAY} environment variable or with the @samp{--display} option
@env{DISPLAY} environment variable or with the @samp{--display} option
(@pxref{Initial Options}). To connect to another display, use the
command @code{make-frame-on-display}:
......
......@@ -370,11 +370,11 @@ returns the command's exit status when it is called from a Lisp program.
@vindex shell-file-name
@cindex environment
Both @kbd{M-!} and @kbd{M-|} use @code{shell-file-name} to specify the
shell to use. This variable is initialized based on your @code{SHELL}
shell to use. This variable is initialized based on your @env{SHELL}
environment variable when Emacs is started. If the file name does not
specify a directory, the directories in the list @code{exec-path} are
searched; this list is initialized based on the environment variable
@code{PATH} when Emacs is started. Your @file{.emacs} file can override
@env{PATH} when Emacs is started. Your @file{.emacs} file can override
either or both of these default initializations.@refill
Both @kbd{M-!} and @kbd{M-|} wait for the shell command to complete.
......@@ -419,15 +419,15 @@ subshell. If you rename this buffer as well, you can create a third
one, and so on. All the subshells run independently and in parallel.
@vindex explicit-shell-file-name
@cindex @code{ESHELL} environment variable
@cindex @code{SHELL} environment variable
@cindex @env{ESHELL} environment variable
@cindex @env{SHELL} environment variable
The file name used to load the subshell is the value of the variable
@code{explicit-shell-file-name}, if that is non-@code{nil}. Otherwise,
the environment variable @code{ESHELL} is used, or the environment
variable @code{SHELL} if there is no @code{ESHELL}. If the file name
the environment variable @env{ESHELL} is used, or the environment
variable @env{SHELL} if there is no @env{ESHELL}. If the file name
specified is relative, the directories in the list @code{exec-path} are
searched; this list is initialized based on the environment variable
@code{PATH} when Emacs is started. Your @file{.emacs} file can override
@env{PATH} when Emacs is started. Your @file{.emacs} file can override
either or both of these default initializations.
To specify a coding system for the shell, you can use the command
......@@ -473,7 +473,7 @@ most common command syntax; it may not work for unusual shells.
alternative and more aggressive method of tracking changes in the
current directory.
Emacs defines the environment variable @code{EMACS} in the subshell,
Emacs defines the environment variable @env{EMACS} in the subshell,
with value @code{t}. A shell script can check this variable to
determine whether it has been run from an Emacs subshell.
......@@ -1032,7 +1032,7 @@ type of terminal your using. Terminal types @samp{ansi}
or @samp{vt100} will work on most systems.
@c If you are talking to a Bourne-compatible
@c shell, and your system understands the @code{TERMCAP} variable,
@c shell, and your system understands the @env{TERMCAP} variable,
@c you can use the command @kbd{M-x shell-send-termcap}, which
@c sends a string specifying the terminal type and size.
@c (This command is also useful after the window has changed size.)
......@@ -1096,13 +1096,13 @@ off directory tracking.
@pindex emacsclient
@cindex Emacs as a server
@cindex server, using Emacs as
@cindex @code{EDITOR} environment variable
@cindex @env{EDITOR} environment variable
Various programs such as @code{mail} can invoke your choice of editor
to edit a particular piece of text, such as a message that you are
sending. By convention, most of these programs use the environment
variable @code{EDITOR} to specify which editor to run. If you set
@code{EDITOR} to @samp{emacs}, they invoke Emacs---but in an
variable @env{EDITOR} to specify which editor to run. If you set
@env{EDITOR} to @samp{emacs}, they invoke Emacs---but in an
inconvenient fashion, by starting a new, separate Emacs process. This
is inconvenient because it takes time and because the new Emacs process
doesn't share the buffers in the existing Emacs process.
......@@ -1111,18 +1111,18 @@ doesn't share the buffers in the existing Emacs process.
programs like @code{mail} by using the Emacs client and Emacs server
programs. Here is how.
@cindex @code{TEXEDIT} environment variable
@cindex @env{TEXEDIT} environment variable
First, the preparation. Within Emacs, call the function
@code{server-start}. (Your @file{.emacs} file can do this automatically
if you add the expression @code{(server-start)} to it.) Then, outside
Emacs, set the @code{EDITOR} environment variable to @samp{emacsclient}.
Emacs, set the @env{EDITOR} environment variable to @samp{emacsclient}.
(Note that some programs use a different environment variable; for
example, to make @TeX{} use @samp{emacsclient}, you should set the
@code{TEXEDIT} environment variable to @samp{emacsclient +%d %s}.)
@env{TEXEDIT} environment variable to @samp{emacsclient +%d %s}.)
@kindex C-x #
@findex server-edit
Then, whenever any program invokes your specified @code{EDITOR}
Then, whenever any program invokes your specified @env{EDITOR}
program, the effect is to send a message to your principal Emacs telling
it to visit a file. (That's what the program @code{emacsclient} does.)
Emacs displays the buffer immediately and you can immediately begin
......@@ -1131,7 +1131,7 @@ editing it.
When you've finished editing that buffer, type @kbd{C-x #}
(@code{server-edit}). This saves the file and sends a message back to
the @code{emacsclient} program telling it to exit. The programs that
use @code{EDITOR} wait for the ``editor'' (actually, @code{emacsclient})
use @env{EDITOR} wait for the ``editor'' (actually, @code{emacsclient})
to exit. @kbd{C-x #} also checks for other pending external requests
to edit various files, and selects the next such file.
......
......@@ -249,20 +249,20 @@ example, the name of a backup file for @file{docs.txt} is
turn on support for long file names. If you do that, Emacs doesn't
truncate file names or convert them to lower case; instead, it uses the
file names that you specify, verbatim. To enable long file name
support, set the environment variable @code{LFN} to @samp{y} before
support, set the environment variable @env{LFN} to @samp{y} before
starting Emacs. Unfortunately, Windows NT doesn't allow DOS programs to
access long file names, so Emacs built for MS-DOS will only see their
short 8+3 aliases.
@cindex @code{HOME} directory under MS-DOS
@cindex @env{HOME} directory under MS-DOS
MS-DOS has no notion of home directory, so Emacs on MS-DOS pretends
that the directory where it is installed is the value of @code{HOME}
that the directory where it is installed is the value of @env{HOME}
environment variable. That is, if your Emacs binary,
@file{emacs.exe}, is in the directory @file{c:/utils/emacs/bin}, then
Emacs acts as if @code{HOME} were set to @samp{c:/utils/emacs}. In
Emacs acts as if @env{HOME} were set to @samp{c:/utils/emacs}. In
particular, that is where Emacs looks for the init file @file{_emacs}.
With this in mind, you can use @samp{~} in file names as an alias for
the home directory, as you would in Unix. You can also set @code{HOME}
the home directory, as you would in Unix. You can also set @env{HOME}
variable in the environment before starting Emacs; its value will then
override the above default behavior.
......
......@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ conversion, uncompression and auto mode selection as
@vindex default-enable-multibyte-characters
To turn off multibyte character support by default, start Emacs with
the @samp{--unibyte} option (@pxref{Initial Options}), or set the
environment variable @samp{EMACS_UNIBYTE}. You can also customize
environment variable @env{EMACS_UNIBYTE}. You can also customize
@code{enable-multibyte-characters} or, equivalently, directly set the
variable @code{default-enable-multibyte-characters} in your init file to
have basically the same effect as @samp{--unibyte}.
......
......@@ -1806,7 +1806,7 @@ In La@TeX{} text, the argument of any of the commands @code{\chapter},
tag.@refill
Other commands can make tags as well, if you specify them in the
environment variable @code{TEXTAGS} before invoking @code{etags}. The
environment variable @env{TEXTAGS} before invoking @code{etags}. The
value of this environment variable should be a colon-separated list of
command names. For example,
......
......@@ -302,10 +302,10 @@ mail with Rmail. This operation is called @dfn{getting new mail}. You
can get new mail at any time in Rmail by typing @kbd{g}.
@vindex rmail-primary-inbox-list
@cindex @code{MAIL} environment variable
@cindex @env{MAIL} environment variable
The variable @code{rmail-primary-inbox-list} contains a list of the
files which are inboxes for your primary Rmail file. If you don't set
this variable explicitly, it is initialized from the @code{MAIL}
this variable explicitly, it is initialized from the @env{MAIL}
environment variable, or, as a last resort, set to @code{nil}, which
means to use the default inbox. The default inbox is
@file{/var/mail/@var{username}}, @file{/usr/spool/mail/@var{username}},
......@@ -1122,13 +1122,13 @@ with POP if you compile it with the macro @code{MAIL_USE_POP} defined.
@code{movemail} only works with POP3, not with older
versions of POP.
@cindex @code{MAILHOST} environment variable
@cindex @env{MAILHOST} environment variable
@cindex POP inboxes
Assuming you have compiled and installed @code{movemail}
appropriately, you can specify a POP inbox by using a ``file name'' of
the form @samp{po:@var{username}}, in the inbox list of an Rmail file.
@code{movemail} handles such a name by opening a connection to the POP
server. The @code{MAILHOST} environment variable specifies the machine
server. The @env{MAILHOST} environment variable specifies the machine
to look for the server on; alternatively, you can specify the POP server
host name as part of the mailbox name using the syntax
@samp{po:@var{username}:@var{hostname}}.
......
......@@ -171,14 +171,14 @@ the @samp{Reply-to} address in preference to the @samp{From} address.
By adding a @samp{Reply-to} field to your header, you can work around
any problems your @samp{From} address may cause for replies.
@cindex @code{REPLYTO} environment variable
@cindex @env{REPLYTO} environment variable
@vindex mail-default-reply-to
To put a fixed @samp{Reply-to} address into every outgoing message, set
the variable @code{mail-default-reply-to} to that address (as a string).
Then @code{mail} initializes the message with a @samp{Reply-to} field as
specified. You can delete or alter that header field before you send
the message, if you wish. When Emacs starts up, if the environment
variable @code{REPLYTO} is set, @code{mail-default-reply-to} is
variable @env{REPLYTO} is set, @code{mail-default-reply-to} is
initialized from that environment variable.
@item In-reply-to
......
......@@ -1440,11 +1440,11 @@ view the progress of your output towards being printed. If your terminal
has the ability to display @TeX{} output files, you can preview the
output on the terminal with @kbd{C-c C-v} (@code{tex-view}).
@cindex @code{TEXINPUTS} environment variable
@cindex @env{TEXINPUTS} environment variable
@vindex tex-directory
You can specify the directory to use for running @TeX{} by setting the
variable @code{tex-directory}. @code{"."} is the default value. If
your environment variable @code{TEXINPUTS} contains relative directory
your environment variable @env{TEXINPUTS} contains relative directory
names, or if your files contains @samp{\input} commands with relative
file names, then @code{tex-directory} @emph{must} be @code{"."} or you
will get the wrong results. Otherwise, it is safe to specify some other
......
......@@ -570,9 +570,9 @@ specified dribble file until the Emacs process is killed.
@item
@findex open-termscript
@cindex termscript file
@cindex @code{TERM} environment variable
@cindex @env{TERM} environment variable
For possible display bugs, the terminal type (the value of environment
variable @code{TERM}), the complete termcap entry for the terminal from
variable @env{TERM}), the complete termcap entry for the terminal from
@file{/etc/termcap} (since that file is not identical on all machines),
and the output that Emacs actually sent to the terminal.
......@@ -946,14 +946,14 @@ form that is clearly safe to install.
If you would like to help pretest Emacs releases to assure they work
well, or if you would like to work on improving Emacs, please contact
the maintainers at @code{bug-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org}. A pretester
the maintainers at @email{bug-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org}. A pretester
should be prepared to investigate bugs as well as report them. If you'd
like to work on improving Emacs, please ask for suggested projects or
suggest your own ideas.
If you have already written an improvement, please tell us about it. If
you have not yet started work, it is useful to contact
@code{bug-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org} before you start; it might be
@email{bug-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org} before you start; it might be
possible to suggest ways to make your extension fit in better with the
rest of Emacs.
......@@ -966,7 +966,7 @@ ways to find it:
@itemize @bullet
@item
Send a message to the mailing list
@code{help-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org}, or post your request on
@email{help-gnu-emacs@@gnu.org}, or post your request on
newsgroup @code{gnu.emacs.help}. (This mailing list and newsgroup
interconnect, so it does not matter which one you use.)
......
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