Commit 623cec4c authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

* mark.texi (Mark): Further clarifications.

(Setting Mark): Emphasize that C-SPC activates the mark.
parent 702b10e1
2009-05-28 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* mark.texi (Mark): Further clarifications.
(Setting Mark): Emphasize that C-SPC activates the mark.
2009-05-28 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* mark.texi (Mark): Clarify introduction. Mention disabling Transient
......
......@@ -16,9 +16,10 @@ The region always extends between point and the mark, no matter which
one comes earlier in the text; each time you move point, the region
changes.
When the mark is @dfn{active}, Emacs indicates the extent of the
region by highlighting the text within it, using the @code{region}
face (@pxref{Face Customization}). After certain non-motion commands,
Setting the mark at a position in the text also @dfn{activates} it.
When the mark is active, Emacs indicates the extent of the region by
highlighting the text within it, using the @code{region} face
(@pxref{Face Customization}). After certain non-motion commands,
including any command that changes the text in the buffer, Emacs
automatically @dfn{deactivates} the mark; this turns off the
highlighting. You can also explicitly deactivate the mark at any
......@@ -56,7 +57,7 @@ non-@code{nil}, each window highlights its own region.
@table @kbd
@item C-@key{SPC}
Set the mark at point (@code{set-mark-command}).
Set the mark at point, and activate it (@code{set-mark-command}).
@item C-@@
The same.
@item C-x C-x
......@@ -75,14 +76,14 @@ Set the mark at point if the mark is inactive, then move point.
@kindex C-@@
@findex set-mark-command
The most common way to set the mark is with @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}
(@code{set-mark-command}), which sets the mark where point
is@footnote{There is no @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} character in
@acronym{ASCII}; usually, typing @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} on a text terminal
gives the character @kbd{C-@@}. This key is also bound to
@code{set-mark-command}, so unless you are unlucky enough to have an
text terminal that behaves differently, you might as well think of
@kbd{C-@@} as @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}.}. You can then move point away,
leaving the mark behind.
(@code{set-mark-command})@footnote{There is no @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}
character in @acronym{ASCII}; usually, typing @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} on a
text terminal gives the character @kbd{C-@@}. This key is also bound
to @code{set-mark-command}, so unless you are unlucky enough to have
an text terminal that behaves differently, you might as well think of
@kbd{C-@@} as @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}.}. This sets the mark where point is,
and activates it. You can then move point away, leaving the mark
behind.
For example, suppose you wish to convert part of the buffer to upper
case. To accomplish this, go to the beginning of the desired text,
......@@ -95,7 +96,7 @@ deactivates the mark.
@findex exchange-point-and-mark
The command @kbd{C-x C-x} (@code{exchange-point-and-mark}) exchanges
the positions of point and the mark, keeping the region unchanged. If
no mark is active, Emacs first reactivates the mark wherever it was
the mark is inactive, Emacs first reactivates the mark wherever it was
last set. @kbd{C-x C-x} is useful when you are satisfied with the
position of point but want to move the other end of the region (where
the mark is). Using @kbd{C-x C-x} a second time, if necessary, puts
......
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