Commit 62d72a4a authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Describe MS-Windows specific startup issues, incl. emacsclientw.exe

 msdog.texi (Windows Startup): New node.  Move the stuff about the current
 directory from "Windows HOME", and explain all possible ways of invoking
 Emacs on Windows.
parent b8a9e136
......@@ -2,6 +2,8 @@
* msdog.texi (Windows HOME): Mention that HOME can also be set in the
registry, with a cross-reference.
(Windows Startup): New node. Move the stuff about the current
directory from "Windows HOME".
2010-11-23 Bob Rogers <rogers-emacs@rgrjr.dyndns.org>
......
......@@ -1191,6 +1191,7 @@ Emacs and Mac OS / GNUstep
Emacs and Microsoft Windows/MS-DOS
* Windows Startup:: How to start Emacs on Windows.
* Text and Binary:: Text files use CRLF to terminate lines.
* Windows Files:: File-name conventions on Windows.
* ls in Lisp:: Emulation of @code{ls} for Dired.
......
......@@ -28,6 +28,7 @@ However, a few special considerations apply, and they are described
here.
@menu
* Windows Startup:: How to start Emacs on Windows.
* Text and Binary:: Text files use CRLF to terminate lines.
* Windows Files:: File-name conventions on Windows.
* ls in Lisp:: Emulation of @code{ls} for Dired.
......@@ -44,6 +45,68 @@ here.
@end ifnottex
@end menu
@node Windows Startup
@section How to Start Emacs on MS-Windows
@cindex starting Emacs on MS-Windows
There are several ways of starting Emacs on MS-Windows:
@enumerate
@item
@pindex runemacs.exe
@cindex desktop shortcut, MS-Windows
@cindex start directory, MS-Windows
@cindex directory where Emacs starts on MS-Windows
From the desktop shortcut icon: either double-click the left mouse
button on the icon, or click once, then press @key{RET}. The desktop
shortcut should specify as its ``Target'' (in the ``Properties'' of
the shortcut) the full absolute file name of @file{runemacs.exe},
@emph{not} of @file{emacs.exe}. This is because @file{runemacs.exe}
hides the console window that would have been created if the target of
the shortcut were @file{emacs.exe} (which is a console program, as far
as Windows is concerned). If you use this method, Emacs starts in the
directory specified by the shortcut. To control where that is,
right-click on the shortcut, select ``Properties'', and in the
``Shortcut'' tab modify the ``Start in'' field to your liking.
@item
From the Command Prompt window, by typing @kbd{emacs @key{RET}} at the
prompt. The Command Prompt window where you did that will not be
available for invoking other commands until Emacs exits. In this
case, Emacs will start in the current directory of the Windows shell.
@item
From the Command Prompt window, by typing @kbd{runemacs @key{RET}} at
the prompt. The Command Prompt window where you did that will be
immediately available for invoking other commands. In this case,
Emacs will start in the current directory of the Windows shell.
@item
@cindex invoking Emacs from Windows Explorer
@pindex emacsclient.exe
@pindex emacsclientw.exe
Via the Emacs client program, @file{emacsclient.exe} or
@file{emacsclientw.exe}. This allows to invoke Emacs from other
programs, and to reuse a running Emacs process for serving editing
jobs required by other programs. @xref{Emacs Server}. The difference
between @file{emacsclient.exe} and @file{emacsclientw.exe} is that the
former waits for Emacs to signal that the editing job is finished,
while the latter does not wait. Which one of them to use in each case
depends on the expectations of the program that needs editing
services. If the program will use the edited files, it needs to wait
for Emacs, so you should use @file{emacsclient.exe}. By contrast, if
the results of editing are not needed by the invoking program, you
will be better off using @file{emacsclientw.exe}. A notable situation
where you would want @file{emacsclientw.exe} is when you right-click
on a file in the Windows Explorer and select ``Open With'' from the
pop-up menu. Use the @samp{--alternate-editor=} or @samp{-a} options
if Emacs might not be running (or not running as a server) when
@command{emacsclient} is invoked---that will always give you an
editor. When invoked via @command{emacsclient}, Emacs will start in
the current directory of the program that invoked
@command{emacsclient}.
@end enumerate
@node Text and Binary
@section Text Files and Binary Files
@cindex text and binary files on MS-DOS/MS-Windows
......@@ -375,13 +438,6 @@ names, the Windows port of Emacs supports an alternative name
@file{_emacs} as a fallback, if such a file exists in the home
directory, whereas @file{.emacs} does not.
@cindex start directory, MS-Windows
@cindex directory where Emacs starts on MS-Windows
If you use a Windows desktop shortcut to start Emacs, it starts in
the directory specified by the shortcut. To control where that is,
right-click on the shortcut, select ``Properties'', and in the
``Shortcut'' tab modify the ``Start in'' field to your liking.
@node Windows Keyboard
@section Keyboard Usage on MS-Windows
@cindex keyboard, MS-Windows
......
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