Commit 64e207c0 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Program Modes): Mention Python mode.

(Moving by Defuns): Repeating C-M-h extends region.
(Basic Indent): Clarify.
(Custom C Indent): Clarify.
(Expressions): Repeating C-M-@ extends region.
(Info Lookup): Clarify for C-h S.
(Symbol Completion): ESC TAB alternative for M-TAB.
(Electric C): Clarify.
parent 3f6cafd9
......@@ -73,6 +73,7 @@ and you can select it by typing @kbd{M-x @var{l}-mode @key{RET}}.
@cindex Metafont mode
@cindex Modula2 mode
@cindex Prolog mode
@cindex Python mode
@cindex Simula mode
@cindex VHDL mode
@cindex M4 mode
......@@ -84,7 +85,7 @@ variant of Lisp) and the Scheme-based DSSSL expression language, Ada,
ASM, AWK, C, C++, Delphi (Object Pascal), Fortran (free format and fixed
format), Icon, IDL (CORBA), IDLWAVE, Java, Metafont (@TeX{}'s
companion for font creation), Modula2, Objective-C, Octave, Pascal,
Perl, Pike, PostScript, Prolog, Simula, Tcl, and VHDL. There is
Perl, Pike, PostScript, Prolog, Python, Simula, Tcl, and VHDL. There is
also a major mode for makefiles, called Makefile mode. An alternative
mode for Perl is called CPerl mode. Modes are available for the
scripting languages of the common GNU and Unix shells, VMS DCL, and
......@@ -241,6 +242,9 @@ which puts point at the beginning and mark at the end of the current
defun. This is the easiest way to get ready to kill the defun in
order to move it to a different place in the file. If you use the
command while point is between defuns, it uses the following defun.
Successive uses of @kbd{C-M-h}, or using it in Transient Mark mode
when the mark is active, includes an additional defun in the region
each time.
In C mode, @kbd{C-M-h} runs the function @code{c-mark-function},
which is almost the same as @code{mark-defun}; the difference is that
......@@ -375,7 +379,7 @@ whitespace at the beginning of the line, @key{TAB} puts it at the end of
that whitespace; otherwise, @key{TAB} keeps point fixed with respect to
the characters around it.
Use @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to insert a tab at point.
Use @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to insert a tab character at point.
@kindex C-j
@findex newline-and-indent
......@@ -384,12 +388,13 @@ the characters around it.
followed by a @key{TAB}. @kbd{C-j} at the end of a line creates a
blank line and then gives it the appropriate indentation.
@key{TAB} indents lines that start within a parenthetical grouping
each under the preceding line (or the text after the parenthesis).
Therefore, if you manually give one of these lines a nonstandard
indentation, the lines below will tend to follow it. This behavior is
convenient in cases where you have overridden the standard result of
@key{TAB} because you find it unaesthetic for a particular line.
@key{TAB} indents a line that starts within a parenthetical grouping
under the preceding line within the grouping, or the text after the
parenthesis. Therefore, if you manually give one of these lines a
nonstandard indentation, the lines below will tend to follow it. This
behavior is convenient in cases where you have overridden the standard
result of @key{TAB} because you find it unaesthetic for a particular
line.
Remember that an open-parenthesis, open-brace or other opening delimiter
at the left margin is assumed by Emacs (including the indentation routines)
......@@ -586,10 +591,11 @@ example,
@noindent
specifies an explicit choice for Java mode, and the default @samp{gnu}
style for the other C-like modes. This variable takes effect when you
select one of the C-like major modes; thus, if you specify a new
default style for Java mode, you can make it take effect in an
existing Java mode buffer by typing @kbd{M-x java-mode} there.
style for the other C-like modes. (These settings are actually the
defaults.) This variable takes effect when you select one of the
C-like major modes; thus, if you specify a new default style for Java
mode, you can make it take effect in an existing Java mode buffer by
typing @kbd{M-x java-mode} there.
The @code{gnu} style specifies the formatting recommended by the GNU
Project for C; it is the default, so as to encourage use of our
......@@ -712,8 +718,10 @@ at or after point and the mark.
use @kbd{C-M-@@} (@code{mark-sexp}), which sets mark at the same place
that @kbd{C-M-f} would move to. @kbd{C-M-@@} takes arguments like
@kbd{C-M-f}. In particular, a negative argument is useful for putting
the mark at the beginning of the previous balanced expression.
The alias @kbd{C-M-@key{SPC}} is equivalent to @kbd{C-M-@@}.
the mark at the beginning of the previous balanced expression. The
alias @kbd{C-M-@key{SPC}} is equivalent to @kbd{C-M-@@}. If you use
this command repeatedly, or in Transient Mark mode whenever the mark
is active, it extends the region by one sexp each time.
In languages that use infix operators, such as C, it is not possible
to recognize all balanced expressions as such because there can be
......@@ -1066,9 +1074,10 @@ use in your program.
@kindex C-h S
For C, Lisp, and other languages that have documentation in Info,
you can use @kbd{C-h S} (@code{info-lookup-symbol}) to view the Info
documentation for a symbol. You specify the symbol with the
minibuffer; the default is the symbol appearing in the buffer at
point.
documentation for a symbol used in the program. You specify the
symbol with the minibuffer; the default is the symbol appearing in the
buffer at point. For example, in C mode this looks for the symbol in
the C Library Manual.
The major mode determines where to look for documentation for the
symbol---which Info files to look in, and which indices to search.
......@@ -1316,7 +1325,9 @@ symbol names.
The character @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} runs a command to complete the
partial symbol before point against the set of meaningful symbol
names. This command inserts at point any additional characters that
it can determine from the partial name.
it can determine from the partial name. (If your window manager
defines @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} to switch windows, you can type this Emacs
command as @kbd{@key{ESC} @key{TAB}}.)
If the partial name in the buffer has multiple possible completions
that differ in the very next character, so that it is impossible to
......@@ -1513,10 +1524,10 @@ With prefix argument @var{n}, move @var{n} times.
In C mode and related modes, certain printing characters are
``electric''---in addition to inserting themselves, they also reindent
the current line and may insert newlines. This feature is controlled by
the variable @code{c-auto-newline}. The ``electric'' characters are
@kbd{@{}, @kbd{@}}, @kbd{:}, @kbd{#}, @kbd{;}, @kbd{,}, @kbd{<},
@kbd{>}, @kbd{/}, @kbd{*}, @kbd{(}, and @kbd{)}.
the current line, and optionally also insert newlines. The
``electric'' characters are @kbd{@{}, @kbd{@}}, @kbd{:}, @kbd{#},
@kbd{;}, @kbd{,}, @kbd{<}, @kbd{>}, @kbd{/}, @kbd{*}, @kbd{(}, and
@kbd{)}.
Electric characters insert newlines only when the @dfn{auto-newline}
feature is enabled (indicated by @samp{/a} in the mode line after the
......
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