Commit 68d0e2f0 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Various clarifications.

parent a50c7a80
......@@ -7,9 +7,9 @@
@findex calendar
Emacs provides the functions of a desk calendar, with a diary of
planned or past events. It also has facilities for other related tasks,
such as managing your appointments, or keeping track of how much time
you spend working on a certain project.
planned or past events. It also has facilities for managing your
appointments, and keeping track of how much time you spend working on
certain projects.
To enter the calendar, type @kbd{M-x calendar}; this displays a
three-month calendar centered on the current month, with point on the
......@@ -373,8 +373,8 @@ then the printed calendars show the holidays in @code{calendar-holidays}.
If the variable @code{cal-tex-diary} is non-@code{nil} (the default is
@code{nil}), diary entries are included also (in weekly and monthly
calendars only). If the variable @code{cal-tex-rules} is non-@code{nil}
(the default is @code{nil}), the calendar styles with sufficient room
have ruled pages.
(the default is @code{nil}), the calendar displays ruled pages
in styles that have sufficient room.
@node Holidays
@section Holidays
......@@ -1443,23 +1443,26 @@ savings time should occur. For Cambridge, Massachusetts both variables'
values are 120.
@node Time Intervals
@section Keeping Track of Time Intervals
@cindex time intervals, keeping track of
@cindex project, time spent working on
@section Summing Time Intervals
@cindex time intervals, summing
@cindex summing time intervals
@cindex timeclock
Emacs can help you keep track of time intervals. A typical scenario
is to keep track of how much time you spend working on certain projects.
The timeclock feature adds up time intervals, so you can (for
instance) keep track of how much time you spend working.
@findex timeclock-in
@findex timeclock-out
@findex timeclock-workday-remaining
@findex timeclock-when-to-leave
Use the @kbd{M-x timeclock-in} command when you start working on a
project, and @kbd{M-x timeclock-out} command when you're done. Once
you've collected some data, you can use @kbd{M-x
timeclock-workday-remaining} to see how much time is left to work today
(assuming a typical average of 8 hours a day), and @kbd{M-x
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're free to go.
project, and @kbd{M-x timeclock-out} command when you're done. Each
time you do this, it adds one time interval to the record of the project.
Once you've collected data from a number of time intervals, you can use
@kbd{M-x timeclock-workday-remaining} to see how much time is left to
work today (assuming a typical average of 8 hours a day), and @kbd{M-x
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're ``done.''
@vindex timeclock-modeline-display
@findex timeclock-modeline-display
......@@ -1469,21 +1472,22 @@ workday in the mode line, either customize the
@code{t}, or invoke the @kbd{M-x timeclock-modeline-display} command.
@vindex timeclock-ask-before-exiting
Ending the current Emacs session might or might not mean that you stop
working on the project. If you'd like Emacs to ask you about this, set
the value of the variable @code{timeclock-ask-before-exiting} to
@code{t} (via @kbd{M-x customize}). By default, only an explicit
@kbd{M-x timeclock-out} tells Emacs you stopped working on a project.
Terminating the current Emacs session might or might not mean that
you have stopped working on the project. If you'd like Emacs to ask
you about this, set the value of the variable
@code{timeclock-ask-before-exiting} to @code{t} (via @kbd{M-x
customize}). By default, only an explicit @kbd{M-x timeclock-out}
tells Emacs that the current interval is over.
@cindex @file{.timelog} file
@vindex timeclock-file
@findex timeclock-reread-log
The timeclock functions work by accumulating the data on a file called
@file{.timelog} in the user's home directory. (On MS-DOS, this file is
called @file{_timelog}, since leading dots in file names are not
allowed.) The name of this file can be changed by customizing the
variable @code{timeclock-file}. If you edit this file manually, or if
you change the value of any of timeclock's customizable variables, you
should run the command @kbd{M-x timeclock-reread-log}. This will
recompute any discrepancies in your average working time, and will make
sure that the various display functions return the correct value.
The timeclock functions work by accumulating the data on a file
called @file{.timelog} in your home directory. (On MS-DOS, this file
is called @file{_timelog}, since an initial period is not allowed in
file names on MS-DOS.) You can specify a different name for this file
by customizing the variable @code{timeclock-file}. If you edit the
timeclock file manually, or if you change the value of any of
timeclock's customizable variables, you should run the command
@kbd{M-x timeclock-reread-log} to update the data in Emacs from the
file.
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