Commit 6cfd0fa2 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

Remove Syntax node from Emacs manual.

This node served no purpose in the Customization section.

* doc/emacs/custom.texi (Syntax): Node deleted.

* doc/emacs/emacs.texi (Top): Update node listing.

* doc/emacs/help.texi (Help Summary):
* doc/emacs/major.texi (Major Modes):
* doc/emacs/programs.texi (Parentheses):
* doc/emacs/search.texi (Regexp Backslash, Regexp Backslash)
(Regexp Backslash):
* doc/emacs/text.texi (Words): Callers changed.
parent 7847b2a1
2011-07-10 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* custom.texi (Syntax): Node deleted.
* help.texi (Help Summary):
* major.texi (Major Modes):
* programs.texi (Parentheses):
* search.texi (Regexp Backslash, Regexp Backslash)
(Regexp Backslash):
* text.texi (Words): Callers changed.
* text.texi (Refill, Longlines): Delete nodes.
* ack.texi (Acknowledgments): Longlines removed from manual.
......
......@@ -31,8 +31,6 @@ Reference Manual}.
you can control their functioning.
* Key Bindings:: The keymaps say what command each key runs.
By changing them, you can "redefine keys".
* Syntax:: The syntax table controls how words and
expressions are parsed.
* Init File:: How to write common customizations in the
@file{.emacs} file.
@end menu
......@@ -2085,36 +2083,6 @@ invoke it; disabling also applies if the command is invoked using
@kbd{M-x}. However, disabling a command has no effect on calling it
as a function from Lisp programs.
@node Syntax
@section The Syntax Table
@cindex syntax table
All the Emacs commands which parse words or balance parentheses are
controlled by the @dfn{syntax table}. The syntax table says which
characters are opening delimiters, which are parts of words, which are
string quotes, and so on. It does this by assigning each character to
one of fifteen-odd @dfn{syntax classes}. In some cases it specifies
some additional information also.
Each major mode has its own syntax table (though related major modes
sometimes share one syntax table), which it installs in each buffer
that uses the mode. The syntax table installed in the current buffer
is the one that all commands use, so we call it ``the'' syntax table.
@kindex C-h s
@findex describe-syntax
To display a description of the contents of the current syntax
table, type @kbd{C-h s} (@code{describe-syntax}). The description of
each character includes the string you would have to give to
@code{modify-syntax-entry} to set up that character's current syntax,
starting with the character which designates its syntax class, plus
some English text to explain its meaning.
A syntax table is actually a Lisp object, a char-table, whose
elements are cons cells. For full information on the syntax table,
see @ref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables, elisp, The Emacs Lisp
Reference Manual}.
@node Init File
@section The Init File, @file{~/.emacs}
@cindex init file
......
......@@ -168,15 +168,13 @@ Important Text-Changing Commands
* Killing:: Killing (cutting) text.
* Yanking:: Recovering killed text. Moving text. (Pasting.)
* Accumulating Text:: Other ways of copying text.
* Rectangles:: Operating on the text inside a rectangle on the screen.
* CUA Bindings:: Using @kbd{C-x}, @kbd{C-c}, @kbd{C-v} for copy
and paste, with enhanced rectangle support.
* Rectangles:: Operating on text in rectangular areas.
* CUA Bindings:: Using @kbd{C-x}, @kbd{C-c}, @kbd{C-v} to kill and yank.
* Registers:: Saving a text string or a location in the buffer.
* Display:: Controlling what text is displayed.
* Search:: Finding or replacing occurrences of a string.
* Fixit:: Commands especially useful for fixing typos.
* Keyboard Macros:: A keyboard macro records a sequence of
keystrokes to be replayed with a single command.
* Keyboard Macros:: Recording a sequence of keystrokes to be replayed.
Major Structures of Emacs
* Files:: All about handling files.
......@@ -192,7 +190,7 @@ Advanced Features
* Programs:: Commands and modes for editing programs.
* Building:: Compiling, running and debugging programs.
* Maintaining:: Features for maintaining large programs.
* Abbrevs:: How to define text abbreviations to reduce
* Abbrevs:: Defining text abbreviations to reduce
the number of characters you must type.
@c AFAICS, the tex stuff generates its own index and does not use this one.
@ifnottex
......@@ -204,9 +202,9 @@ Advanced Features
* Dired:: You can ``edit'' a directory to manage files in it.
* Calendar/Diary:: The calendar and diary facilities.
* Document View:: Viewing PDF, PS and DVI files.
* Gnus:: How to read netnews with Emacs.
* Gnus:: A flexible mail and news reader.
* Shell:: Executing shell commands from Emacs.
* Emacs Server:: Using Emacs as an editing server for @code{mail}, etc.
* Emacs Server:: Using Emacs as an editing server.
* Printing:: Printing hardcopies of buffers or regions.
* Sorting:: Sorting lines, paragraphs or pages within Emacs.
* Narrowing:: Restricting display and editing to a portion
......@@ -1066,10 +1064,8 @@ Customization
* Variables:: Many Emacs commands examine Emacs variables
to decide what to do; by setting variables,
you can control their functioning.
* Key Bindings:: The keymaps say what command each key runs.
By changing them, you can "redefine keys".
* Syntax:: The syntax table controls how words and
expressions are parsed.
* Key Bindings:: Keymaps say what command each key runs.
By changing them, you can ``redefine'' keys.
* Init File:: How to write common customizations in the
@file{.emacs} file.
......
......@@ -962,7 +962,7 @@ special Emacs commands for moving over and operating on paragraphs.
@item Parsing
We say that certain Emacs commands parse words or expressions in the
text being edited. Really, all they know how to do is find the other
end of a word or expression. @xref{Syntax}.
end of a word or expression.
@item Point
Point is the place in the buffer at which insertion and deletion
......@@ -1212,7 +1212,8 @@ See `font lock.'
@item Syntax Table
The syntax table tells Emacs which characters are part of a word,
which characters balance each other like parentheses, etc.
@xref{Syntax}.
@xref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference
Manual}.
@item Super
Super is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
......
......@@ -139,8 +139,11 @@ command.
@item C-h r
Display the Emacs manual in Info (@code{info-emacs-manual}).
@item C-h s
Display the current contents of the syntax table, with an explanation of
what they mean (@code{describe-syntax}). @xref{Syntax}.
Display the current contents of the @dfn{syntax table}, with an
explanation of what they mean (@code{describe-syntax}). The syntax
table says which characters are opening delimiters, which are parts of
words, which are string quotes, and so on. @xref{Syntax Tables,,
Syntax Tables, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}, for details.
@item C-h t
Enter the Emacs interactive tutorial (@code{help-with-tutorial}).
@item C-h v @var{var} @key{RET}
......@@ -583,7 +586,8 @@ bindings now in effect: first the local bindings of the current minor
modes, then the local bindings defined by the current major mode, and
finally the global bindings (@pxref{Key Bindings}). @kbd{C-h s}
displays the contents of the syntax table, with explanations of each
character's syntax (@pxref{Syntax}).
character's syntax (@pxref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables, elisp, The
Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}).
You can get a list of subcommands for a particular prefix key by
typing @kbd{C-h} after the prefix key. (There are a few prefix keys
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ units.
* Yanking:: Commands that insert text.
* Accumulating Text:: Other methods to add text to the buffer.
* Rectangles:: Operating on text in rectangular areas.
* CUA Bindings:: Using C-x/C-c/C-v to kill and yank.
* CUA Bindings:: Using @kbd{C-x}/@kbd{C-c}/@kbd{C-v} to kill and yank.
@end menu
@node Deletion and Killing
......
......@@ -31,7 +31,6 @@ prefix key @kbd{C-c} normally contains mode-specific commands. In
addition, the commands which handle comments use the mode to determine
how comments are to be delimited. Many major modes redefine the
syntactical properties of characters appearing in the buffer.
@xref{Syntax}.
The major modes fall into three major groups. The first group
contains modes for normal text, either plain or with mark-up. It
......
......@@ -643,8 +643,9 @@ balanced.
When talking about these facilities, the term ``parenthesis'' also
includes braces, brackets, or whatever delimiters are defined to match
in pairs. The major mode controls which delimiters are significant,
through the syntax table (@pxref{Syntax}). In Lisp, only parentheses
count; in C, these commands apply to braces and brackets too.
through the syntax table (@pxref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables, elisp,
The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}). In Lisp, only parentheses count;
in C, these commands apply to braces and brackets too.
You can use @kbd{M-x check-parens} to find any unbalanced
parentheses and unbalanced string quotes in the buffer.
......
......@@ -870,8 +870,9 @@ matches at the end of the buffer only if the contents end with a
word-constituent character.
@item \w
matches any word-constituent character. The syntax table
determines which characters these are. @xref{Syntax}.
matches any word-constituent character. The syntax table determines
which characters these are. @xref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@item \W
matches any character that is not a word-constituent.
......@@ -892,7 +893,8 @@ symbol-constituent character.
matches any character whose syntax is @var{c}. Here @var{c} is a
character that designates a particular syntax class: thus, @samp{w}
for word constituent, @samp{-} or @samp{ } for whitespace, @samp{.}
for ordinary punctuation, etc. @xref{Syntax}.
for ordinary punctuation, etc. @xref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@item \S@var{c}
matches any character whose syntax is not @var{c}.
......@@ -911,8 +913,9 @@ matches any character that does @emph{not} belong to category
@var{c}.
@end table
The constructs that pertain to words and syntax are controlled by the
setting of the syntax table (@pxref{Syntax}).
The constructs that pertain to words and syntax are controlled by
the setting of the syntax table. @xref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@node Regexp Example
@section Regular Expression Example
......
......@@ -154,9 +154,10 @@ the mark by one additional word. @kbd{M-@@} also accepts a numeric
argument that says how many words to scan for the place to put the
mark.
The word commands' understanding of word boundaries is controlled
by the syntax table. Any character can, for example, be declared to
be a word delimiter. @xref{Syntax}.
The word commands' understanding of word boundaries is controlled by
the syntax table. Any character can, for example, be declared to be a
word delimiter. @xref{Syntax Tables,, Syntax Tables, elisp, The Emacs
Lisp Reference Manual}.
@node Sentences
@section Sentences
......
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