Commit 702dbfd9 authored by Jay Belanger's avatar Jay Belanger
Browse files

(Yacas Language, Maxima Language, Giac Language): New sections.

parent 6c47d819
2007-12-29 Jay Belanger <jay.p.belanger@gmail.com>
* calc.tex (Yacas Language, Maxima Language, Giac Language):
New sections.
2007-12-29 Reiner Steib <Reiner.Steib@gmx.de>
* gnus.texi (Group Parameters): Reorder the text and add a note about
......
......@@ -13965,13 +13965,13 @@ entered this way or using square brackets. Since FORTRAN uses round
parentheses for both function calls and array subscripts, Calc displays
both in the same way; @samp{a(i)} is interpreted as a function call
upon reading, and subscripts must be entered as @samp{subscr(a, i)}.
Also, if the variable @code{a} has been declared to have type
@code{vector} or @code{matrix} then @samp{a(i)} will be parsed as a
subscript. (@xref{Declarations}.) Usually it doesn't matter, though;
if you enter the subscript expression @samp{a(i)} and Calc interprets
it as a function call, you'll never know the difference unless you
switch to another language mode or replace @code{a} with an actual
vector (or unless @code{a} happens to be the name of a built-in
If the variable @code{a} has been declared to have type
@code{vector} or @code{matrix}, however, then @samp{a(i)} will be
parsed as a subscript. (@xref{Declarations}.) Usually it doesn't
matter, though; if you enter the subscript expression @samp{a(i)} and
Calc interprets it as a function call, you'll never know the difference
unless you switch to another language mode or replace @code{a} with an
actual vector (or unless @code{a} happens to be the name of a built-in
function!).
 
Underscores are allowed in variable and function names in all of these
......@@ -14404,7 +14404,7 @@ $$ \pmatrix{ {a \over b} & 0 \cr 0 & 2^{(x + 1)} } $$
@sp 2
@end iftex
 
@node Eqn Language Mode, Mathematica Language Mode, TeX and LaTeX Language Modes, Language Modes
@node Eqn Language Mode, Yacas Language Mode, TeX and LaTeX Language Modes, Language Modes
@subsection Eqn Language Mode
 
@noindent
......@@ -14480,7 +14480,87 @@ The words @code{lcol} and @code{rcol} are recognized as synonyms
for @code{ccol} during input, and are generated instead of @code{ccol}
if the matrix justification mode so specifies.
 
@node Mathematica Language Mode, Maple Language Mode, Eqn Language Mode, Language Modes
@node Yacas Language Mode, Maxima Language Mode, Eqn Language Mode, Language Modes
@subsection Yacas Language Mode
@noindent
@kindex d Y
@pindex calc-yacas-language
@cindex Yacas language
The @kbd{d Y} (@code{calc-yacas-language}) command selects the
conventions of Yacas, a free computer algebra system. While the
operators and functions in Yacas are similar to those of Calc, the names
of built-in functions in Yacas are capitalized. The Calc formula
@samp{sin(2 x)}, for example, is entered and displayed @samp{Sin(2 x)}
in Yacas mode, and `@samp{arcsin(x^2)} is @samp{ArcSin(x^2)} in Yacas
mode. Complex numbers are written are written @samp{3 + 4 I}.
The standard special constants are written @code{Pi}, @code{E},
@code{I}, @code{GoldenRatio} and @code{Gamma}. @code{Infinity}
represents both @code{inf} and @code{uinf}, and @code{Undefined}
represents @code{nan}.
Certain operators on functions, such as @code{D} for differentiation
and @code{Integrate} for integration, take a prefix form in Yacas. For
example, the derivative of @w{@samp{e^x sin(x)}} can be computed with
@w{@samp{D(x) Exp(x)*Sin(x)}}.
Other notable differences between Yacas and standard Calc expressions
are that vectors and matrices use curly braces in Yacas, and subscripts
use square brackets. If, for example, @samp{A} represents the list
@samp{@{a,2,c,4@}}, then @samp{A[3]} would equal @samp{c}.
@node Maxima Language Mode, Giac Language Mode, Yacas Language Mode, Language Modes
@subsection Maxima Language Mode
@noindent
@kindex d X
@pindex calc-maxima-language
@cindex Maxima language
The @kbd{d X} (@code{calc-maxima-language}) command selects the
conventions of Maxima, another free computer algebra system. The
function names in Maxima are similar, but not always identical, to Calc.
For example, instead of @samp{arcsin(x)}, Maxima will use
@samp{asin(x)}. Complex numbers are written @samp{3 + 4 %i}. The
standard special constants are written @code{%pi}, @code{%e},
@code{%i}, @code{%phi} and @code{%gamma}. In Maxima, @code{inf} means
the same as in Calc, but @code{infinity} represents Calc's @code{uinf}.
Underscores as well as percent signs are allowed in function and
variable names in Maxima mode. The underscore again is equivalent to
the @samp{#} in Normal mode, and the percent sign is equivalent to
@samp{o'o}.
Maxima uses square brackets for lists and vectors, and matrices are
written as calls to the function @code{matrix}, given the row vectors of
the matrix as arguments. Square brackets are also used as subscripts.
@node Giac Language Mode, Mathematica Language Mode, Maxima Language Mode, Language Modes
@subsection Giac Language Mode
@noindent
@kindex d A
@pindex calc-giac-language
@cindex Giac language
The @kbd{d A} (@code{calc-giac-language}) command selects the
conventions of Giac, another free computer algebra system. The function
names in Giac are similar to Maxima. Complex numbers are written
@samp{3 + 4 i}. The standard special constants in Giac are the same as
in Calc, except that @code{infinity} represents both Calc's @code{inf}
and @code{uinf}.
Underscores are allowed in function and variable names in Giac mode.
Brackets are used for subscripts. In Giac, indexing of lists begins at
0, instead of 1 as in Calc. So if @samp{A} represents the list
@samp{[a,2,c,4]}, then @samp{A[2]} would equal @samp{c}. In general,
@samp{A[n]} in Giac mode corresponds to @samp{A_(n+1)} in Normal mode.
The Giac interval notation @samp{2 .. 3} has no surrounding brackets;
Calc reads @samp{2 .. 3} as the closed interval @samp{[2 .. 3]} and
writes any kind of interval as @samp{2 .. 3}. This means you cannot see
the difference between an open and a closed interval while in Giac mode.
@node Mathematica Language Mode, Maple Language Mode, Giac Language Mode, Language Modes
@subsection Mathematica Language Mode
 
@noindent
......@@ -14525,11 +14605,8 @@ pass through Calc. As a special case, matrices are written as calls
to the function @code{matrix}, given a list of lists as the argument,
and can be read in this form or with all-capitals @code{MATRIX}.
 
The Maple interval notation @samp{2 .. 3} has no surrounding brackets;
Calc reads @samp{2 .. 3} as the closed interval @samp{[2 .. 3]}, and
writes any kind of interval as @samp{2 .. 3}. This means you cannot
see the difference between an open and a closed interval while in
Maple display mode.
The Maple interval notation @samp{2 .. 3} is like Giac's interval
notation, and is handled the same by Calc.
 
Maple writes complex numbers as @samp{3 + 4*I}. Its special constants
are @code{Pi}, @code{E}, @code{I}, and @code{infinity} (all three of
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment