Commit 718fb8a1 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Replace M-C- with C-M-

parent 2df5238c
......@@ -546,11 +546,11 @@ these functions are available through the Ada menu, and you can also use
the following key bindings or the command names:
@table @kbd
@item M-C-e
@item C-M-e
@findex ada-next-procedure
Move to the next function/procedure/task, which ever comes next
(@code{ada-next-procedure}).
@item M-C-a
@item C-M-a
@findex ada-previous-procedure
Move to previous function/procedure/task
(@code{ada-previous-procedure}).
......@@ -791,7 +791,7 @@ name of the variable.
@table @kbd
@item @key{TAB}
Indent the current line or the current region.
@item M-C-\
@item C-M-\
Indent lines in the current selected block.
@item C-c @key{TAB}
Indent the current line and prints the name of the variable used for
......
......@@ -1536,10 +1536,10 @@ variables, described below. See @code{c-tab-always-indent},
numeric argument, this command rigidly indents the region, preserving
the relative indentation among the lines.
@kindex M-C-q
@kindex C-M-q
@findex c-indent-exp
@findex indent-exp (c-)
@item @kbd{M-C-q} (@code{c-indent-exp})
@item @kbd{C-M-q} (@code{c-indent-exp})
Indent an entire balanced brace or parenthesis expression. Note that
point must be on the opening brace or parenthesis of the expression you
want to indent.
......@@ -1554,17 +1554,17 @@ re-indent a nested brace construct, such as a nested class or function,
or a Java method. The top-level construct being re-indented must be
complete, i.e. it must have both a beginning brace and an ending brace.
@kindex M-C-\
@kindex C-M-\
@findex indent-region
@item @kbd{M-C-\} (@code{indent-region})
@item @kbd{C-M-\} (@code{indent-region})
Indents an arbitrary region of code. This is a standard Emacs command,
tailored for C code in a @ccmode{} buffer. Note that of course, point
and mark must delineate the region you want to indent.
@kindex M-C-h
@kindex C-M-h
@findex c-mark-function
@findex mark-function (c-)
@item @kbd{M-C-h} (@code{c-mark-function})
@item @kbd{C-M-h} (@code{c-mark-function})
While not strictly an indentation command, this is useful for marking
the current top-level function or class definition as the current
region. As with @code{c-indent-defun}, this command operates on
......@@ -1718,7 +1718,7 @@ argument, move backward.
Move point to the beginning of the innermost C statement. If point is
already at the beginning of a statement, move to the beginning of the
closest preceding statement, even if that means moving into a block (you
can use @kbd{M-C-b} to move over a balanced block). With prefix
can use @kbd{C-M-b} to move over a balanced block). With prefix
argument @var{n}, move back @var{n} @minus{} 1 statements.
If point is within or next to a comment or a string which spans more
......@@ -1735,7 +1735,7 @@ whether to do sentence motion in or near comments and multiline strings.
@item @kbd{M-e} (@code{c-end-of-statement})
Move point to the end of the innermost C statement. If point is at the
end of a statement, move to the end of the next statement, even if it's
inside a nested block (use @kbd{M-C-f} to move to the other side of the
inside a nested block (use @kbd{C-M-f} to move to the other side of the
block). With prefix argument @var{n}, move forward @var{n} @minus{} 1
statements.
......
......@@ -114,13 +114,13 @@ used in the FAQ.
@end menu
@node Basic keys, Extended commands, FAQ notation, FAQ notation
@section What do these mean: @kbd{C-h}, @kbd{M-C-a}, @key{RET}, @kbd{@key{ESC} a}, etc.?
@section What do these mean: @kbd{C-h}, @kbd{C-M-a}, @key{RET}, @kbd{@key{ESC} a}, etc.?
@cindex Basic keys
@cindex Control key, notation for
@cindex @key{Meta} key, notation for
@cindex Control-Meta characters, notation for
@cindex @kbd{C-h}, definition of
@cindex @kbd{M-C-h}, definition of
@cindex @kbd{C-M-h}, definition of
@cindex @key{DEL}, definition of
@cindex @key{ESC}, definition of
@cindex @key{LFD}, definition of
......@@ -1482,7 +1482,7 @@ to search for unprintable characters using @code{re-search-forward}:
Using @code{isearch-forward-regexp}:
@kbd{M-C-s [^ @key{TAB} @key{LFD} C-q @key{RET} C-q C-l @key{SPC} -~]}
@kbd{C-M-s [^ @key{TAB} @key{LFD} C-q @key{RET} C-q C-l @key{SPC} -~]}
To delete all unprintable characters, simply use replace-regexp:
......@@ -2010,7 +2010,7 @@ delete it and reinsert it. Emacs will momentarily move the cursor to
the matching parenthesis.
@item
@kbd{M-C-f} (@code{forward-sexp}) and @kbd{M-C-b} (@code{backward-sexp})
@kbd{C-M-f} (@code{forward-sexp}) and @kbd{C-M-b} (@code{backward-sexp})
will skip over one set of balanced parentheses, so you can see which
parentheses match. (You can train it to skip over balanced brackets
and braces at the same time by modifying the syntax table.)
......@@ -2107,7 +2107,7 @@ You can type the form in the @file{*scratch*} buffer, and then type
will be inserted in the buffer.
@item
In @code{emacs-lisp-mode}, typing @kbd{M-C-x} evaluates a top-level form
In @code{emacs-lisp-mode}, typing @kbd{C-M-x} evaluates a top-level form
before or around point.
@item
......
......@@ -1972,8 +1972,8 @@ This is yet one more command that does the same as the @key{RET}
command, but this one does it without expunging and hiding dormants
(@code{gnus-group-visible-select-group}).
 
@item M-C-@key{RET}
@kindex M-C-@key{RET} @r{(Group)}
@item C-M-@key{RET}
@kindex C-M-@key{RET} @r{(Group)}
@findex gnus-group-select-group-ephemerally
Finally, this command selects the current group ephemerally without
doing any processing of its contents
......@@ -3025,8 +3025,8 @@ zombies.
Run all expirable articles in the current group through the expiry
process (if any) (@code{gnus-group-expire-articles}).
 
@item C-c M-C-x
@kindex C-c M-C-x @r{(Group)}
@item C-c C-M-x
@kindex C-c C-M-x @r{(Group)}
@findex gnus-group-expire-all-groups
Run all articles in all groups through the expiry process
(@code{gnus-group-expire-all-groups}).
......@@ -5843,9 +5843,9 @@ meaningful. Here's one example:
@table @kbd
 
@item T k
@itemx M-C-k
@itemx C-M-k
@kindex T k @r{(Summary)}
@kindex M-C-k @r{(Summary)}
@kindex C-M-k @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-kill-thread
Mark all articles in the current (sub-)thread as read
(@code{gnus-summary-kill-thread}). If the prefix argument is positive,
......@@ -5853,9 +5853,9 @@ remove all marks instead. If the prefix argument is negative, tick
articles instead.
 
@item T l
@itemx M-C-l
@itemx C-M-l
@kindex T l @r{(Summary)}
@kindex M-C-l @r{(Summary)}
@kindex C-M-l @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-lower-thread
Lower the score of the current (sub-)thread
(@code{gnus-summary-lower-thread}).
......@@ -5926,8 +5926,8 @@ understand the numeric prefix.
 
@item T n
@kindex T n @r{(Summary)}
@itemx M-C-n
@kindex M-C-n @r{(Summary)}
@itemx C-M-n
@kindex C-M-n @r{(Summary)}
@itemx M-down
@kindex M-down @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-next-thread
......@@ -5935,8 +5935,8 @@ Go to the next thread (@code{gnus-summary-next-thread}).
 
@item T p
@kindex T p @r{(Summary)}
@itemx M-C-p
@kindex M-C-p @r{(Summary)}
@itemx C-M-p
@kindex C-M-p @r{(Summary)}
@itemx M-up
@kindex M-up @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-prev-thread
......@@ -8506,8 +8506,8 @@ process/prefix convention (@pxref{Process/Prefix}).
Expire all expirable articles in the group
(@code{gnus-summary-expire-articles}).
 
@item B M-C-e
@kindex B M-C-e @r{(Summary)}
@item B C-M-e
@kindex B C-M-e @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-expire-articles-now
Delete all the expirable articles in the group
(@code{gnus-summary-expire-articles-now}). This means that @strong{all}
......@@ -8799,8 +8799,8 @@ whenever you see a message that is a collection of other messages of
some format, you @kbd{C-d} and read these messages in a more convenient
fashion.
 
@item M-C-d
@kindex M-C-d @r{(Summary)}
@item C-M-d
@kindex C-M-d @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-read-document
This command is very similar to the one above, but lets you gather
several documents into one biiig group
......@@ -8824,14 +8824,14 @@ to have truncation switched off while reading articles.
Expand the summary buffer window (@code{gnus-summary-expand-window}).
If given a prefix, force an @code{article} window configuration.
 
@item M-C-e
@kindex M-C-e @r{(Summary)}
@item C-M-e
@kindex C-M-e @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-edit-parameters
Edit the group parameters (@pxref{Group Parameters}) of the current
group (@code{gnus-summary-edit-parameters}).
 
@item M-C-a
@kindex M-C-a @r{(Summary)}
@item C-M-a
@kindex C-M-a @r{(Summary)}
@findex gnus-summary-customize-parameters
Customize the group parameters (@pxref{Group Parameters}) of the current
group (@code{gnus-summary-customize-parameters}).
......@@ -17094,9 +17094,9 @@ same time? You can't, and you're probably perfectly happy that way.
I'm not, so I've added a second prefix---the @dfn{symbolic prefix}. The
prefix key is @kbd{M-i} (@code{gnus-symbolic-argument}), and the next
character typed in is the value. You can stack as many @kbd{M-i}
prefixes as you want. @kbd{M-i a M-C-u} means ``feed the @kbd{M-C-u}
command the symbolic prefix @code{a}''. @kbd{M-i a M-i b M-C-u} means
``feed the @kbd{M-C-u} command the symbolic prefixes @code{a} and
prefixes as you want. @kbd{M-i a C-M-u} means ``feed the @kbd{C-M-u}
command the symbolic prefix @code{a}''. @kbd{M-i a M-i b C-M-u} means
``feed the @kbd{C-M-u} command the symbolic prefixes @code{a} and
@code{b}''. You get the drift.
 
Typing in symbolic prefixes to commands that don't accept them doesn't
......@@ -18090,7 +18090,7 @@ never be totally undoable.
@findex gnus-undo
The undoability is provided by the @code{gnus-undo-mode} minor mode. It
is used if @code{gnus-use-undo} is non-@code{nil}, which is the
default. The @kbd{M-C-_} key performs the @code{gnus-undo}
default. The @kbd{C-M-_} key performs the @code{gnus-undo}
command, which should feel kinda like the normal Emacs @code{undo}
command.
 
......@@ -19918,7 +19918,7 @@ There's a way now to specify that ``uninteresting'' fields be suppressed
when generating lines in buffers (@pxref{Advanced Formatting}).
 
@item
Several commands in the group buffer can be undone with @kbd{M-C-_}
Several commands in the group buffer can be undone with @kbd{C-M-_}
(@pxref{Undo}).
 
@item
......@@ -19950,7 +19950,7 @@ the native server (@pxref{Changing Servers}).
 
@item
A new command for reading collections of documents
(@code{nndoc} with @code{nnvirtual} on top) has been added---@kbd{M-C-d}
(@code{nndoc} with @code{nnvirtual} on top) has been added---@kbd{C-M-d}
(@pxref{Really Various Summary Commands}).
 
@item
......@@ -22093,7 +22093,7 @@ description = <string>
 
Believe it or not, but some people who use Gnus haven't really used
Emacs much before they embarked on their journey on the Gnus Love Boat.
If you are one of those unfortunates whom ``@kbd{M-C-a}'', ``kill the
If you are one of those unfortunates whom ``@kbd{C-M-a}'', ``kill the
region'', and ``set @code{gnus-flargblossen} to an alist where the key
is a regexp that is used for matching on the group name'' are magical
phrases with little or no meaning, then this appendix is for you. If
......@@ -22133,11 +22133,11 @@ which is the meta key on this keyboard. It's usually located somewhere
to the left hand side of the keyboard, usually on the bottom row.
 
Now, us Emacs people don't say ``press the meta-control-m key'',
because that's just too inconvenient. We say ``press the @kbd{M-C-m}
because that's just too inconvenient. We say ``press the @kbd{C-M-m}
key''. @kbd{M-} is the prefix that means ``meta'' and ``C-'' is the
prefix that means ``control''. So ``press @kbd{C-k}'' means ``press
down the control key, and hold it down while you press @kbd{k}''.
``Press @kbd{M-C-k}'' means ``press down and hold down the meta key and
``Press @kbd{C-M-k}'' means ``press down and hold down the meta key and
the control key and then press @kbd{k}''. Simple, ay?
 
This is somewhat complicated by the fact that not all keyboards have a
......
......@@ -272,7 +272,7 @@ Some configuration examples are also given in the appendix.
@multitable @columnfractions .15 .85
@item @key{TAB}
@tab Indent the current line relative to context.
@item @kbd{M-C-\}
@item @kbd{C-M-\}
@tab Re-indent all lines in the current region.
@item @kbd{M-@key{RET}}
@tab Start a continuation line. Or split the current line at point.
......@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ end
The indentation probably looks funny, since it's different from the
settings you use, so use the @key{TAB} key in each line to automatically
line it up (or more quickly @emph{select} the entire buffer with
@kbd{C-x h} followed by @kbd{M-C-\}). Notice how different syntactical
@kbd{C-x h} followed by @kbd{C-M-\}). Notice how different syntactical
elements are highlighted in different colors, if you have set up support
for font-lock.
......@@ -550,7 +550,7 @@ following lines in @file{.emacs}
@end lisp
Restart Emacs, take the program we developed in the first part of this
tutorial and re-indent it with @kbd{C-c h} and @kbd{M-C-\}. You
tutorial and re-indent it with @kbd{C-c h} and @kbd{C-M-\}. You
probably want to keep these lines in @file{.emacs}, with values adjusted
to your likings. If you want to get more information about any of these
variables, type, e.g., @kbd{C-h v idlwave-main-block-indent @key{RET}}.
......@@ -712,11 +712,11 @@ governed by a number of variables.
@cindex Foreign code, adapting
@cindex Indentation, of foreign code
@kindex M-C-\
@kindex C-M-\
To re-indent a larger portion of code (e.g. when working with foreign code
written with different conventions), use @kbd{M-C-\}
written with different conventions), use @kbd{C-M-\}
(@code{indent-region}) after marking the relevant code. Useful marking
commands are @kbd{C-x h} (the entire file) or @kbd{M-C-h} (the
commands are @kbd{C-x h} (the entire file) or @kbd{C-M-h} (the
current subprogram). @xref{Actions}, for information how to impose
additional formatting conventions on foreign code.
......@@ -1491,7 +1491,7 @@ must be non-@code{nil}.
Action can also be applied to a larger piece of code, e.g. in order to
convert foreign code to your own style. To do this, mark the relevant
part of the code and execute @kbd{M-x expand-region-abbrevs}. Useful
marking commands are @kbd{C-x h} (the entire file) or @kbd{M-C-h} (the
marking commands are @kbd{C-x h} (the entire file) or @kbd{C-M-h} (the
current subprogram). @xref{Code Indentation}, for information how to
adjust the indentation of the code.
@end itemize
......@@ -1679,13 +1679,13 @@ program. These are
@tab Beginning of block (stay inside the block)
@item @kbd{C-c @}}
@tab End of block (stay inside the block)
@item @kbd{M-C-n}
@item @kbd{C-M-n}
@tab Forward block (on same level)
@item @kbd{M-C-p}
@item @kbd{C-M-p}
@tab Backward block (on same level)
@item @kbd{M-C-d}
@item @kbd{C-M-d}
@tab Down block (enters a block)
@item @kbd{M-C-u}
@item @kbd{C-M-u}
@tab Backward up block (leaves a block)
@item @kbd{C-c C-n}
@tab Next Statement
......
......@@ -446,8 +446,8 @@ Move to the signature of the message (@code{message-goto-signature}).
Yank the message that's being replied to into the message buffer
(@code{message-yank-original}).
@item C-c M-C-y
@kindex C-c M-C-y
@item C-c C-M-y
@kindex C-c C-M-y
@findex message-yank-buffer
Prompt for a buffer name and yank the contents of that buffer into the
message buffer (@code{message-yank-buffer}).
......
......@@ -2132,7 +2132,7 @@ Select one of multiple index keys (those separated with @samp{||}).
@item e
Edit the replacement text.
@item C-r
Recursive edit. Use @kbd{M-C-c} to return to the indexing process.
Recursive edit. Use @kbd{C-M-c} to return to the indexing process.
@item s
Save this buffer and ask again about the current match.
@item S
......
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