Commit 75708135 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
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*** empty log message ***

parent caccdcbb
......@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ and background colors, so you cannot specify different colors for
the scroll bars.
@item
For simplicity, all ASCII characters now have the same height and width.
For simplicity, all @sc{ascii} characters now have the same height and width.
(Certain characters, such as Chinese characters, always have twice
the standard width.) All characters are created equal.
......
......@@ -2096,7 +2096,7 @@ better to use the smaller font in its own size, which Emacs does.
@end example
@noindent
the font specification for ASCII characters would be this:
the font specification for @sc{ascii} characters would be this:
@example
-*-fixed-medium-r-normal-*-24-*-ISO8859-1
......
......@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@ ordered most-recently-selected first.
@item font
The name of the font for displaying text in the frame. This is a
string, either a valid font name for your system or the name of an Emacs
fontset (@pxref{Fontsets}). Changing this frame parameter on a frame,
fontset (@pxref{Fontsets}). Changing this frame parameter on a frame
also changes the font-related attributes of the default face on that
frame.
......@@ -522,9 +522,11 @@ number you specify is whether it is greater than zero.)
@item screen-gamma
If this is a number, Emacs performs ``gamma correction'' on colors. The
value should be the screen gamma of your display, a floating point
number. Usual PC monitors have a screen gamma of 2.2. Smaller values
result in darker colors; you might want to try a screen gamma of 1.5 for
LCD color displays. The viewing gamma Emacs uses is 0.4545 (1/2.2).
number. Usual PC monitors have a screen gamma of 2.2, so the default is
to display for that gamma value. Specifying a smaller value results in
darker colors, which is desirable for a monitor that tends to display
colors too light. A screen gamma value of 1.5 may give good results for
LCD color displays.
@item tool-bar-lines
The number of lines to use for the toolbar. A value of @code{nil} means
......@@ -1503,13 +1505,14 @@ amount of green, and the amount of blue. Each integer ranges in
principle from 0 to 65535, but in practice the largest value used is
65280.
These functions accept a frame as an optional argument. We hope in
the future to make Emacs support multiple text-only terminals; then
this'argument will specify which terminal to operate on (the default
being the selected frame). At present, though, the @var{frame} argument
has no effect.
These functions accept a display (either a frame or the name of a
terminal) as an optional argument. We hope in the future to make Emacs
support more than one text-only terminal at one time; then this argument
will specify which terminal to operate on (the default being the
selected frame's terminal). At present, though, the @var{display}
argument has no effect.
@defun tty-color-define name number &optional rgb frame
@defun tty-color-define name number &optional rgb display
@tindex tty-color-define
This function associates the color name @var{name} with
color number @var{number} on the terminal.
......@@ -1521,12 +1524,12 @@ approximate other colors, because Emacs does not know what it looks
like.
@end defun
@defun tty-color-clear &optional frame
@defun tty-color-clear &optional display
@tindex tty-color-clear
This function clears the table of defined colors for a text-only terminal.
@end defun
@defun tty-color-alist &optional frame
@defun tty-color-alist &optional display
@tindex tty-color-alist
This function returns an alist recording the known colors supported by a
text-only terminal.
......@@ -1538,18 +1541,17 @@ If present, @var{rgb} is an rgb value that says what the color
actually looks like.
@end defun
@defun tty-color-approximate rgb &optional frame
@defun tty-color-approximate rgb &optional display
@tindex tty-color-approximate
This function finds the closest color, among the known colors supported
for @var{frame}'s terminal, to that described by the rgb value
@var{rgb}.
for @var{display}, to that described by the rgb value @var{rgb}.
@end defun
@defun tty-color-translate color &optional frame
@defun tty-color-translate color &optional display
@tindex tty-color-translate
This function finds the closest color to @var{color} among the known
colors supported for @var{frame}'s terminal. If the name @var{color} is
not defined, the value is @code{nil}.
colors supported for @var{display}. If the name @var{color} is not
defined, the value is @code{nil}.
@var{color} can be an X-style @code{"#@var{xxxyyyzzz}"} specification
instead of an actual name. The format
......
......@@ -1256,7 +1256,7 @@ redefines @kbd{C-x C-\} to move down a line.
redefines the first (leftmost) mouse button, typed with the Meta key, to
set point where you click.
@cindex non-ASCII text in keybindings
@cindex non-@sc{ascii} text in keybindings
Be careful when using non-@sc{ascii} text characters in Lisp
specifications of keys to bind. If these are read as multibyte text, as
they usually will be in a Lisp file (@pxref{Loading Non-ASCII}), you
......
......@@ -287,7 +287,7 @@ tells @code{locate-library} to display the file name in the echo area.
@end deffn
@node Loading Non-ASCII
@section Loading Non-ASCII Characters
@section Loading Non-@sc{ascii} Characters
When Emacs Lisp programs contain string constants with non-@sc{ascii}
characters, these can be represented within Emacs either as unibyte
......
......@@ -4,9 +4,9 @@
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../info/characters
@node Non-ASCII Characters, Searching and Matching, Text, Top
@chapter Non-ASCII Characters
@chapter Non-@sc{ascii} Characters
@cindex multibyte characters
@cindex non-ASCII characters
@cindex non-@sc{ascii} characters
This chapter covers the special issues relating to non-@sc{ascii}
characters and how they are stored in strings and buffers.
......
......@@ -227,8 +227,8 @@ characters. @xref{String Type}.
Characters in strings, buffers, and files are currently limited to the
range of 0 to 524287---nineteen bits. But not all values in that range
are valid character codes. Codes 0 through 127 are ASCII codes; the
rest are non-ASCII (@pxref{Non-ASCII Characters}). Characters that represent
are valid character codes. Codes 0 through 127 are @sc{ascii} codes; the
rest are non-@sc{ascii} (@pxref{Non-ASCII Characters}). Characters that represent
keyboard input have a much wider range, to encode modifier keys such as
Control, Meta and Shift.
......@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ of basic character codes.
@ifnottex
2**7
@end ifnottex
bit attached to an ASCII character indicates a meta character; thus, the
bit attached to an @sc{ascii} character indicates a meta character; thus, the
meta characters that can fit in a string have codes in the range from
128 to 255, and are the meta versions of the ordinary @sc{ascii}
characters. (In Emacs versions 18 and older, this convention was used
......@@ -897,7 +897,7 @@ but the newline is ignored if escaped."
@end example
@node Non-ASCII in Strings
@subsubsection Non-ASCII Characters in Strings
@subsubsection Non-@sc{ascii} Characters in Strings
You can include a non-@sc{ascii} international character in a string
constant by writing it literally. There are two text representations
......
......@@ -420,8 +420,8 @@ This matches any @sc{ascii} control character.
This matches @samp{0} through @samp{9}. Thus, @samp{[-+[:digit:]]}
matches any digit, as well as @samp{+} and @samp{-}.
@item [:graph:]
This matches graphic characters---everything except @sc{ascii} control characters,
space, and DEL.
This matches graphic characters---everything except @sc{ascii} control
characters, space, and the delete character.
@item [:lower:]
This matches any lower-case letter, as determined by
the current case table (@pxref{Case Tables}).
......
......@@ -2631,7 +2631,7 @@ had faces assigned automatically by a feature such as Font-Lock mode.
@kindex display @r{(text property)}
This property activates various features that change the
way text is displayed. For example, it can make text appear taller
or shorter, higher or lower, wider or narror, or replaced with an image.
or shorter, higher or lower, wider or narrow, or replaced with an image.
@xref{Display Property}.
@item help-echo
......@@ -2834,12 +2834,13 @@ names are in the list. For example, if a character has a
then insertion before the character can inherit its @code{face} property
and its @code{read-only} property, but no others.
The @code{rear-nonsticky} works the opposite way. A property is
normally rear-sticky by default, so the @code{rear-nonsticky} property
says which properties are @emph{not} rear-sticky. If a character's
@code{rear-nonsticky} property is @code{t}, then none of its properties
are rear-sticky. If the @code{rear-nonsticky} property is a list,
properties are rear-sticky @emph{unless} their names are in the list.
The @code{rear-nonsticky} property works the opposite way. Most
properties are rear-sticky by default, so the @code{rear-nonsticky}
property says which properties are @emph{not} rear-sticky. If a
character's @code{rear-nonsticky} property is @code{t}, then none of its
properties are rear-sticky. If the @code{rear-nonsticky} property is a
list, properties are rear-sticky @emph{unless} their names are in the
list.
@defvar text-property-default-nonsticky
@tindex text-property-default-nonsticky
......@@ -3155,15 +3156,15 @@ closest to @var{new-pos} that is in the same field as @var{old-pos}.
If @var{new-pos} is @code{nil}, then @code{constrain-to-field} uses
the value of point instead, and moves point to the resulting position.
If @var{old-pos} is at the boundary of two fields, then the allowable
positions for @var{new-pos} depends on the value of the optional
argument @var{escape-from-edge}. If @var{escape-from-edge} is
@code{nil}, then @var{new-pos} is constrained to the field that has the
same @code{field} text-property that new characters inserted at
@var{old-pos} would get. (This depends on the stickiness of the
@code{field} property for the characters before and after
@var{old-pos}.) If @var{escape-from-edge} is non-@code{nil},
@var{new-pos} is constrained to the union of the two adjacent fields.
If @var{old-pos} is at the boundary of two fields, then the acceptable
positions for @var{new-pos} depend on the value of the optional argument
@var{escape-from-edge}. If @var{escape-from-edge} is @code{nil}, then
@var{new-pos} is constrained to the field that has the same @code{field}
text-property that new characters inserted at @var{old-pos} would get.
(This depends on the stickiness of the @code{field} property for the
characters before and after @var{old-pos}.) If @var{escape-from-edge}
is non-@code{nil}, @var{new-pos} is constrained to the union of the two
adjacent fields.
If the optional argument @var{only-in-line} is non-@code{nil}, and
constraining @var{new-pos} in the usual way would move it to a different
......@@ -3282,10 +3283,10 @@ translation table.
A register is a sort of variable used in Emacs editing that can hold a
variety of different kinds of values. Each register is named by a
single character. All ASCII characters and their meta variants (but
with the exception of @kbd{C-g}) can be used to name registers. Thus,
there are 255 possible registers. A register is designated in Emacs
Lisp by the character that is its name.
single character. All @sc{ascii} characters and their meta variants
(but with the exception of @kbd{C-g}) can be used to name registers.
Thus, there are 255 possible registers. A register is designated in
Emacs Lisp by the character that is its name.
@defvar register-alist
This variable is an alist of elements of the form @code{(@var{name} .
......
......@@ -564,7 +564,7 @@ This function selects the @var{count}th following window in the cyclic
order. If count is negative, then it moves back @minus{}@var{count}
windows in the cycle, rather than forward. It returns @code{nil}.
The argument @var{all-frames} has the same meaning is as in
The argument @var{all-frames} has the same meaning as in
@code{next-window}, but the @var{minibuf} argument of @code{next-window}
is always effectively @code{nil}.
......
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