Commit 76dd3692 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Replace @sc{ascii} and ASCII with @acronym{ASCII}.

parent ad800164
......@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ for news articles and @file{cpp.el} which hides or highlights parts of
C programs according to preprocessor conditionals.
@item
Tomas Abrahamsson wrote @file{artist.el}, a package for producing ASCII
Tomas Abrahamsson wrote @file{artist.el}, a package for producing @acronym{ASCII}
art with a mouse or with keyboard keys.
@item
......@@ -359,7 +359,7 @@ Odd Gripenstam wrote @file{dcl-mode.el} for editing DCL command files.
@item
Michael Gschwind wrote @file{iso-cvt.el}, a package to convert between
the ISO 8859-1 character set and the notations for non-ASCII
the ISO 8859-1 character set and the notations for non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters used by @TeX{} and net tradition, and @file{latin-2.el}, code
which sets up case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-2
character set.
......@@ -374,10 +374,10 @@ Doug Gwyn wrote the portable @code{alloca} implementation.
@item
Ken'ichi Handa implemented most of the support for international
character sets, and wrote @file{isearch-x.el}, a facility for searching
non-ASCII text. Together with Naoto Takahashi, he wrote
@file{quail.el}, a simple input facility for typing non-ASCII text from
an ASCII keyboard. Ken'ichi also wrote @file{ps-bdf.el}, a BDF font
support for printing non-ASCII text on a PostScript printer.
non-@acronym{ASCII} text. Together with Naoto Takahashi, he wrote
@file{quail.el}, a simple input facility for typing non-@acronym{ASCII} text from
an @acronym{ASCII} keyboard. Ken'ichi also wrote @file{ps-bdf.el}, a BDF font
support for printing non-@acronym{ASCII} text on a PostScript printer.
@item
Chris Hanson wrote @file{netuname.el}, a package to use HP-UX's Remote
......@@ -396,7 +396,7 @@ command loop and appropriate help facilities,
@item
@file{emacsbug.el}, a package for reporting Emacs bugs,
@item
@file{picture.el}, a mode for editing ASCII pictures, and
@file{picture.el}, a mode for editing @acronym{ASCII} pictures, and
@item
@file{view.el}, a package for perusing files and buffers without editing
them.
......
......@@ -623,7 +623,7 @@ Char: c (0143, 99, 0x63) point=21044 of 26883(78%) column 53
The four values after @samp{Char:} describe the character that follows
point, first by showing it and then by giving its character code in
octal, decimal and hex. For a non-ASCII multibyte character, these are
octal, decimal and hex. For a non-@acronym{ASCII} multibyte character, these are
followed by @samp{ext} and the character's representation, in hex, in
the buffer's coding system, if that coding system encodes the character
safely and with a single byte (@pxref{Coding Systems}). If the
......@@ -665,7 +665,7 @@ point=26957 of 26956(100%) column 0
@cindex text properties at point
@w{@kbd{C-u C-x =}} displays additional information about a
character, including the character set name and the codes that
identify the character within that character set; ASCII characters are
identify the character within that character set; @acronym{ASCII} characters are
identified as belonging to the @code{ascii} character set. It also
shows the character's syntax, categories, and encodings both
internally in the buffer and externally if you save the file. It also
......
......@@ -671,7 +671,7 @@ emacs --display=glasperle:0 &
@end smallexample
You can inhibit the direct use of the window system and GUI with the
@samp{-nw} option. It tells Emacs to display using ordinary ASCII on
@samp{-nw} option. It tells Emacs to display using ordinary @acronym{ASCII} on
its controlling terminal. This is also an initial option.
Sometimes, security arrangements prevent a program on a remote system
......
......@@ -15,33 +15,33 @@ how Emacs interprets your keyboard and mouse input.
@cindex input with the keyboard
@cindex keyboard input
@cindex character set (keyboard)
@cindex ASCII
@cindex @acronym{ASCII}
@cindex C-
@cindex Control
@cindex control characters
GNU Emacs uses an extension of the ASCII character set for keyboard
GNU Emacs uses an extension of the @acronym{ASCII} character set for keyboard
input; it also accepts non-character input events including function
keys and mouse button actions.
ASCII consists of 128 character codes. Some of these codes are
@acronym{ASCII} consists of 128 character codes. Some of these codes are
assigned graphic symbols such as @samp{a} and @samp{=}; the rest are
control characters, such as @kbd{Control-a} (usually written @kbd{C-a}
for short). @kbd{C-a} gets its name from the fact that you type it by
holding down the @key{CTRL} key while pressing @kbd{a}.
Some ASCII control characters have special names, and most terminals
Some @acronym{ASCII} control characters have special names, and most terminals
have special keys you can type them with: for example, @key{RET},
@key{TAB}, @key{DEL} and @key{ESC}. The space character is usually
referred to below as @key{SPC}, even though strictly speaking it is a
graphic character whose graphic happens to be blank. Some keyboards
have a key labeled ``linefeed'' which is an alias for @kbd{C-j}.
Emacs extends the ASCII character set with thousands more printing
Emacs extends the @acronym{ASCII} character set with thousands more printing
characters (@pxref{International}), additional control characters, and a
few more modifiers that can be combined with any character.
On ASCII terminals, there are only 32 possible control characters.
On @acronym{ASCII} terminals, there are only 32 possible control characters.
These are the control variants of letters and @samp{@@[]\^_}. In
addition, the shift key is meaningless with control characters:
@kbd{C-a} and @kbd{C-A} are the same character, and Emacs cannot
......@@ -117,8 +117,8 @@ Reference Manual}, for more information. If you are not doing Lisp
programming, but simply want to redefine the meaning of some characters
or non-character events, see @ref{Customization}.
ASCII terminals cannot really send anything to the computer except
ASCII characters. These terminals use a sequence of characters to
@acronym{ASCII} terminals cannot really send anything to the computer except
@acronym{ASCII} characters. These terminals use a sequence of characters to
represent each function key. But that is invisible to the Emacs user,
because the keyboard input routines recognize these special sequences
and convert them to function key events before any other part of Emacs
......@@ -243,27 +243,27 @@ variables will make sense. @xref{Variables}.
@cindex characters (in text)
Text in Emacs buffers is a sequence of 8-bit bytes. Each byte can
hold a single ASCII character. Both ASCII control characters (octal
codes 000 through 037, and 0177) and ASCII printing characters (codes
040 through 0176) are allowed; however, non-ASCII control characters
hold a single @acronym{ASCII} character. Both @acronym{ASCII} control characters (octal
codes 000 through 037, and 0177) and @acronym{ASCII} printing characters (codes
040 through 0176) are allowed; however, non-@acronym{ASCII} control characters
cannot appear in a buffer. The other modifier flags used in keyboard
input, such as Meta, are not allowed in buffers either.
Some ASCII control characters serve special purposes in text, and have
Some @acronym{ASCII} control characters serve special purposes in text, and have
special names. For example, the newline character (octal code 012) is
used in the buffer to end a line, and the tab character (octal code 011)
is used for indenting to the next tab stop column (normally every 8
columns). @xref{Text Display}.
Non-ASCII printing characters can also appear in buffers. When
multibyte characters are enabled, you can use any of the non-ASCII
Non-@acronym{ASCII} printing characters can also appear in buffers. When
multibyte characters are enabled, you can use any of the non-@acronym{ASCII}
printing characters that Emacs supports. They have character codes
starting at 256, octal 0400, and each one is represented as a sequence
of two or more bytes. @xref{International}. Single-byte characters
with codes 128 through 255 can also appear in multibyte buffers.
If you disable multibyte characters, then you can use only one
alphabet of non-ASCII characters, but they all fit in one byte. They
alphabet of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, but they all fit in one byte. They
use codes 0200 through 0377. @xref{Single-Byte Character Support}.
@ignore
......
......@@ -1081,7 +1081,7 @@ name which usually consists of lower-case letters and hyphens.
* Init Rebinding:: Rebinding keys with your init file, @file{.emacs}.
* Function Keys:: Rebinding terminal function keys.
* Named ASCII Chars:: Distinguishing @key{TAB} from @kbd{C-i}, and so on.
* Non-ASCII Rebinding:: Rebinding non-ASCII characters such as Latin-1.
* Non-ASCII Rebinding:: Rebinding non-@acronym{ASCII} characters such as Latin-1.
* Mouse Buttons:: Rebinding mouse buttons in Emacs.
* Disabling:: Disabling a command means confirmation is required
before it can be executed. This is done to protect
......@@ -1405,8 +1405,8 @@ command is less work to invoke when you really want to.
you can specify them in your @file{.emacs} file by using their Lisp
syntax. (@xref{Init File}.)
The simplest method for doing this works for ASCII characters and
Meta-modified ASCII characters only. This method uses a string to
The simplest method for doing this works for @acronym{ASCII} characters and
Meta-modified @acronym{ASCII} characters only. This method uses a string to
represent the key sequence you want to rebind. For example, here's how
to bind @kbd{C-z} to @code{shell}:
......@@ -1436,7 +1436,7 @@ string, you can use the Emacs Lisp escape sequences, @samp{\t},
(global-set-key "\C-x\t" 'indent-rigidly)
@end example
These examples show how to write some other special ASCII characters
These examples show how to write some other special @acronym{ASCII} characters
in strings for key bindings:
@example
......@@ -1446,7 +1446,7 @@ in strings for key bindings:
@end example
When the key sequence includes function keys or mouse button events,
or non-ASCII characters such as @code{C-=} or @code{H-a}, you must use
or non-@acronym{ASCII} characters such as @code{C-=} or @code{H-a}, you must use
the more general method of rebinding, which uses a vector to specify the
key sequence.
......@@ -1458,8 +1458,8 @@ character, write it as a Lisp character constant: @samp{?} followed by
the character as it would appear in a string.
Here are examples of using vectors to rebind @kbd{C-=} (a control
character not in ASCII), @kbd{C-M-=} (not in ASCII because @kbd{C-=}
is not), @kbd{H-a} (a Hyper character; ASCII doesn't have Hyper at
character not in @acronym{ASCII}), @kbd{C-M-=} (not in @acronym{ASCII} because @kbd{C-=}
is not), @kbd{H-a} (a Hyper character; @acronym{ASCII} doesn't have Hyper at
all), @key{F7} (a function key), and @kbd{C-Mouse-1} (a
keyboard-modified mouse button):
......@@ -1490,7 +1490,7 @@ by listing each of the characters within the square brackets that
delimit the vector.
Language and coding systems can cause problems with key bindings
for non-ASCII characters. @xref{Non-ASCII Rebinding}.
for non-@acronym{ASCII} characters. @xref{Non-ASCII Rebinding}.
@node Function Keys
@subsection Rebinding Function Keys
......@@ -1535,7 +1535,7 @@ given function key on your terminal, type @kbd{C-h c} followed by that
key.
A key sequence which contains function key symbols (or anything but
ASCII characters) must be a vector rather than a string. The vector
@acronym{ASCII} characters) must be a vector rather than a string. The vector
syntax uses spaces between the elements, and square brackets around the
whole vector. Thus, to bind function key @samp{f1} to the command
@code{rmail}, write the following:
......@@ -1583,10 +1583,10 @@ word:
@end example
@node Named ASCII Chars
@subsection Named ASCII Control Characters
@subsection Named @acronym{ASCII} Control Characters
@key{TAB}, @key{RET}, @key{BS}, @key{LFD}, @key{ESC} and @key{DEL}
started out as names for certain ASCII control characters, used so often
started out as names for certain @acronym{ASCII} control characters, used so often
that they have special keys of their own. Later, users found it
convenient to distinguish in Emacs between these keys and the ``same''
control characters typed with the @key{CTRL} key.
......@@ -1595,25 +1595,25 @@ control characters typed with the @key{CTRL} key.
reports these keys to Emacs. It treats the ``special'' keys as function
keys named @code{tab}, @code{return}, @code{backspace}, @code{linefeed},
@code{escape}, and @code{delete}. These function keys translate
automatically into the corresponding ASCII characters @emph{if} they
automatically into the corresponding @acronym{ASCII} characters @emph{if} they
have no bindings of their own. As a result, neither users nor Lisp
programs need to pay attention to the distinction unless they care to.
If you do not want to distinguish between (for example) @key{TAB} and
@kbd{C-i}, make just one binding, for the ASCII character @key{TAB}
@kbd{C-i}, make just one binding, for the @acronym{ASCII} character @key{TAB}
(octal code 011). If you do want to distinguish, make one binding for
this ASCII character, and another for the ``function key'' @code{tab}.
this @acronym{ASCII} character, and another for the ``function key'' @code{tab}.
With an ordinary ASCII terminal, there is no way to distinguish
With an ordinary @acronym{ASCII} terminal, there is no way to distinguish
between @key{TAB} and @kbd{C-i} (and likewise for other such pairs),
because the terminal sends the same character in both cases.
@node Non-ASCII Rebinding
@subsection Non-ASCII Characters on the Keyboard
@cindex rebinding non-ASCII keys
@cindex non-ASCII keys, binding
@subsection Non-@acronym{ASCII} Characters on the Keyboard
@cindex rebinding non-@acronym{ASCII} keys
@cindex non-@acronym{ASCII} keys, binding
If your keyboard has keys that send non-ASCII characters, such as
If your keyboard has keys that send non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, such as
accented letters, rebinding these keys is a bit tricky. There are two
solutions you can use. One is to specify a keyboard coding system,
using @code{set-keyboard-coding-system} (@pxref{Specify Coding}).
......@@ -1629,7 +1629,7 @@ Events,,,elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.}, like this:
@noindent
Type @kbd{C-q} followed by the key you want to bind, to insert @var{char}.
Since this puts a non-ASCII character in the @file{.emacs}, you should
Since this puts a non-@acronym{ASCII} character in the @file{.emacs}, you should
specify the proper coding system for that file. @xref{Init Syntax}.
Specify the same coding system for the file that you use for your
keyboard.
......@@ -1868,8 +1868,8 @@ input processing; the keys that are looked up in keymaps contain the
characters that result from keyboard translation.
On a window system, the keyboard key named @key{DELETE} is a function
key and is distinct from the ASCII character named @key{DEL}.
@xref{Named ASCII Chars}. Keyboard translations affect only ASCII
key and is distinct from the @acronym{ASCII} character named @key{DEL}.
@xref{Named ASCII Chars}. Keyboard translations affect only @acronym{ASCII}
character input, not function keys; thus, the above example used on a
window system does not affect the @key{DELETE} key. However, the
translation above isn't necessary on window systems, because Emacs can
......@@ -2002,17 +2002,17 @@ Backslash and double-quote are the only characters for which backslash
sequences are mandatory.
@samp{\C-} can be used as a prefix for a control character, as in
@samp{\C-s} for ASCII control-S, and @samp{\M-} can be used as a prefix for
@samp{\C-s} for @acronym{ASCII} control-S, and @samp{\M-} can be used as a prefix for
a Meta character, as in @samp{\M-a} for @kbd{Meta-A} or @samp{\M-\C-a} for
@kbd{Control-Meta-A}.@refill
@cindex international characters in @file{.emacs}
@cindex non-ASCII characters in @file{.emacs}
If you want to include non-ASCII characters in strings in your init
@cindex non-@acronym{ASCII} characters in @file{.emacs}
If you want to include non-@acronym{ASCII} characters in strings in your init
file, you should consider putting a @w{@samp{-*-coding:
@var{coding-system}-*-}} tag on the first line which states the coding
system used to save your @file{.emacs}, as explained in @ref{Recognize
Coding}. This is because the defaults for decoding non-ASCII text might
Coding}. This is because the defaults for decoding non-@acronym{ASCII} text might
not yet be set up by the time Emacs reads those parts of your init file
which use such strings, possibly leading Emacs to decode those strings
incorrectly.
......@@ -2025,7 +2025,7 @@ strings and characters are not interchangeable in Lisp; some contexts
require one and some contexts require the other.
@xref{Non-ASCII Rebinding}, for information about binding commands to
keys which send non-ASCII characters.
keys which send non-@acronym{ASCII} characters.
@item True:
@code{t} stands for `true'.
......
......@@ -888,20 +888,20 @@ lines are displayed in the @code{mode-line} face.
@section How Text Is Displayed
@cindex characters (in text)
ASCII printing characters (octal codes 040 through 0176) in Emacs
@acronym{ASCII} printing characters (octal codes 040 through 0176) in Emacs
buffers are displayed with their graphics, as are non-ASCII multibyte
printing characters (octal codes above 0400).
Some ASCII control characters are displayed in special ways. The
Some @acronym{ASCII} control characters are displayed in special ways. The
newline character (octal code 012) is displayed by starting a new line.
The tab character (octal code 011) is displayed by moving to the next
tab stop column (normally every 8 columns).
Other ASCII control characters are normally displayed as a caret
Other @acronym{ASCII} control characters are normally displayed as a caret
(@samp{^}) followed by the non-control version of the character; thus,
control-A is displayed as @samp{^A}.
Non-ASCII characters 0200 through 0237 (octal) are displayed with
Non-@acronym{ASCII} characters 0200 through 0237 (octal) are displayed with
octal escape sequences; thus, character code 0230 (octal) is displayed
as @samp{\230}. The display of character codes 0240 through 0377
(octal) may be either as escape sequences or as graphics. They do not
......
......@@ -641,7 +641,7 @@ user can always forcefully refine specific difference regions by typing
@kindex h
Cycles between full highlighting, the mode where fine differences are not
highlighted (but computed), and the mode where highlighting is done with
ASCII strings. The latter is not really recommended, unless on a dumb TTY.
@acronym{ASCII} strings. The latter is not really recommended, unless on a dumb TTY.
@item r
@kindex r
......
......@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ Major Structures of Emacs
* Buffers:: Multiple buffers; editing several files at once.
* Windows:: Viewing two pieces of text at once.
* Frames:: Running the same Emacs session in multiple X windows.
* International:: Using non-ASCII character sets (the MULE features).
* International:: Using non-@acronym{ASCII} character sets (the MULE features).
Advanced Features
* Major Modes:: Text mode vs. Lisp mode vs. C mode ...
......@@ -712,7 +712,7 @@ The Diary
* Adding to Diary:: Commands to create diary entries.
* Special Diary Entries:: Anniversaries, blocks of dates, cyclic entries, etc.
@sc{Gnus}
Gnus
* Buffers of Gnus:: The group, summary, and article buffers.
* Gnus Startup:: What you should know about starting Gnus.
......
......@@ -161,19 +161,19 @@ written inside quotes or on lines by themselves, like this:
Any real spaces in such a key sequence should be ignored; only @key{SPC}
really means press the space key.
The ASCII code sent by @kbd{C-x} (except for @kbd{C-?}) is the value
The @acronym{ASCII} code sent by @kbd{C-x} (except for @kbd{C-?}) is the value
that would be sent by pressing just @key{x} minus 96 (or 64 for
upper-case @key{X}) and will be from 0 to 31. On Unix and GNU/Linux
terminals, the ASCII code sent by @kbd{M-x} is the sum of 128 and the
ASCII code that would be sent by pressing just @key{x}. Essentially,
terminals, the @acronym{ASCII} code sent by @kbd{M-x} is the sum of 128 and the
@acronym{ASCII} code that would be sent by pressing just @key{x}. Essentially,
@key{Control} turns off bits 5 and 6 and @key{Meta} turns on bit
7@footnote{
DOS and Windows terminals don't set bit 7 when the @key{Meta} key is
pressed.}.
@kbd{C-?} (aka @key{DEL}) is ASCII code 127. It is a misnomer to call
@kbd{C-?} (aka @key{DEL}) is @acronym{ASCII} code 127. It is a misnomer to call
@kbd{C-?} a ``control'' key, since 127 has both bits 5 and 6 turned ON.
Also, on very few keyboards does @kbd{C-?} generate ASCII code 127.
Also, on very few keyboards does @kbd{C-?} generate @acronym{ASCII} code 127.
@inforef{Text Characters, Text Characters, emacs}, and @inforef{Keys,
Keys, emacs}, for more information. (@xref{On-line manual}, for more
......@@ -4541,7 +4541,7 @@ actually behaves.
@cindex Help invoked by Backspace
@cindex DEL key does not delete
The @key{Backspace} key (on most keyboards) generates ASCII code 8.
The @key{Backspace} key (on most keyboards) generates @acronym{ASCII} code 8.
@kbd{C-h} sends the same code. In Emacs by default @kbd{C-h} invokes
help-command. This is intended to be easy to remember since the first
letter of @samp{help} is @samp{h}. The easiest solution to this problem
......@@ -4739,7 +4739,7 @@ press @key{Meta} and @key{a} together, but with @key{ESC}, you press
@cindex Lacking an Escape key
@cindex Escape key, lacking
Type @kbd{C-[} instead. This should send ASCII code 27 just like an
Type @kbd{C-[} instead. This should send @acronym{ASCII} code 27 just like an
Escape key would. @kbd{C-3} may also work on some terminal (but not
under X). For many terminals (notably DEC terminals) @key{F11}
generates @key{ESC}. If not, the following form can be used to bind it:
......@@ -4791,7 +4791,7 @@ is how to make @kbd{H-M-RIGHT} move forward a word:
@item
Not all modifiers are permitted in all situations. @key{Hyper},
@key{Super}, and @key{Alt} are not available on Unix character
terminals. Non-ASCII keys and mouse events (e.g. @kbd{C-=} and
terminals. Non-@acronym{ASCII} keys and mouse events (e.g. @kbd{C-=} and
@kbd{Mouse-1}) also fall under this category.
@end itemize
......@@ -4821,7 +4821,7 @@ For X11: Make sure it really is a @key{Meta} key. Use @code{xev} to
find out what keysym your @key{Meta} key generates. It should be either
@code{Meta_L} or @code{Meta_R}. If it isn't, use @file{xmodmap} to fix
the situation. If @key{Meta} does generate @code{Meta_L} or
@code{Meta_R}, but @kbd{M-x} produces a non-ASCII character, put this in
@code{Meta_R}, but @kbd{M-x} produces a non-@acronym{ASCII} character, put this in
your @file{~/.Xdefaults} file:
@example
......@@ -4914,7 +4914,7 @@ Support, emacs}. On a Unix, when Emacs runs on a text-only terminal
display or is invoked with @samp{emacs -nw}, you typically need to use
@code{set-terminal-coding-system} to tell Emacs what the terminal can
display, even after setting the language environment; otherwise
non-ASCII characters will display as @samp{?}. On other operating
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters will display as @samp{?}. On other operating
systems, such as MS-DOS and MS-Windows, Emacs queries the OS about the
character set supported by the display, and sets up the required
terminal coding system automatically.
......
......@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@ literal @samp{~} should also be quoted with @samp{/:}.
@code{substitute-in-file-name}. The substitution is performed only on
file names read as such using the minibuffer.
You can include non-ASCII characters in file names if you set the
You can include non-@acronym{ASCII} characters in file names if you set the
variable @code{file-name-coding-system} to a non-@code{nil} value.
@xref{Specify Coding}.
......@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ seek. This feature is available only when you are using a window
system. @xref{Frames}.
@findex find-file-literally
If you wish to edit a file as a sequence of ASCII characters with no special
If you wish to edit a file as a sequence of @acronym{ASCII} characters with no special
encoding or conversion, use the @kbd{M-x find-file-literally} command.
It visits a file, like @kbd{C-x C-f}, but does not do format conversion
(@pxref{Formatted Text}), character code conversion (@pxref{Coding
......
......@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ commands for copying between Emacs and other X client programs.
If you select a region with any of these mouse commands, and then
immediately afterward type the @key{DELETE} function key, it deletes the
region that you selected. The @key{BACKSPACE} function key and the
ASCII character @key{DEL} do not do this; if you type any other key
@acronym{ASCII} character @key{DEL} do not do this; if you type any other key
in between the mouse command and @key{DELETE}, it does not do this.
@findex mouse-set-region
......
......@@ -27,16 +27,16 @@ Input, Alt}.
@item Argument
See `numeric argument.'
@item ASCII character
An ASCII character is either an ASCII control character or an ASCII
@item @acronym{ASCII} character
An @acronym{ASCII} character is either an @acronym{ASCII} control character or an @acronym{ASCII}
printing character. @xref{User Input}.
@item ASCII control character
An ASCII control character is the Control version of an upper-case
@item @acronym{ASCII} control character
An @acronym{ASCII} control character is the Control version of an upper-case
letter, or the Control version of one of the characters @samp{@@[\]^_?}.
@item ASCII printing character
ASCII printing characters include letters, digits, space, and these
@item @acronym{ASCII} printing character
@acronym{ASCII} printing characters include letters, digits, space, and these
punctuation characters: @samp{!@@#$%^& *()_-+=|\~` @{@}[]:;"' <>,.?/}.
@item Auto Fill Mode
......@@ -621,8 +621,8 @@ keys, pressing or releasing mouse buttons, and switching between Emacs
frames. @xref{User Input}.
@item Input Method
An input method is a system for entering non-ASCII text characters by
typing sequences of ASCII characters (q.v.@:). @xref{Input Methods}.
An input method is a system for entering non-@acronym{ASCII} text characters by
typing sequences of @acronym{ASCII} characters (q.v.@:). @xref{Input Methods}.
@item Insertion
Insertion means copying text into the buffer, either from the keyboard
......@@ -688,7 +688,7 @@ to exist. Any data within it, if not saved in a file, is lost.
@item Language Environment
Your choice of language environment specifies defaults for the input
method (q.v.@:) and coding system (q.v.@:). @xref{Language
Environments}. These defaults are relevant if you edit non-ASCII text
Environments}. These defaults are relevant if you edit non-@acronym{ASCII} text
(@pxref{International}).
@item Line Wrapping
......@@ -833,13 +833,13 @@ another. The usual way to move text by killing (q.v.@:) and then
yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Killing}.
@item MULE
MULE refers to the Emacs features for editing multilingual non-ASCII text
MULE refers to the Emacs features for editing multilingual non-@acronym{ASCII} text
using multibyte characters (q.v.@:). @xref{International}.
@item Multibyte Character
A multibyte character is a character that takes up several bytes in a
buffer. Emacs uses multibyte characters to represent non-ASCII text,
since the number of non-ASCII characters is much more than 256.
buffer. Emacs uses multibyte characters to represent non-@acronym{ASCII} text,
since the number of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters is much more than 256.
@xref{International Chars, International Characters}.
@item Named Mark
......@@ -875,7 +875,7 @@ characters replace the existing text after point rather than pushing
it to the right. @xref{Minor Modes}.
@item Page
A page is a unit of text, delimited by formfeed characters (ASCII
A page is a unit of text, delimited by formfeed characters (@acronym{ASCII}
control-L, code 014) coming at the beginning of a line. Some Emacs
commands are provided for moving over and operating on pages.
@xref{Pages}.
......
......@@ -152,8 +152,8 @@ what they ought to do, you need to tell Emacs which key to use for
@findex normal-erase-is-backspace-mode
On most text-only terminals, Emacs cannot tell which keys the
keyboard really has, so it follows a uniform plan which may or may not
fit your keyboard. The uniform plan is that the ASCII @key{DEL}
character deletes, and the ASCII @key{BS} (backspace) character asks
fit your keyboard. The uniform plan is that the @acronym{ASCII} @key{DEL}
character deletes, and the @acronym{ASCII} @key{BS} (backspace) character asks
for help (it is the same as @kbd{C-h}). If this is not right for your
keyboard, such as if you find that the key which ought to delete backwards
enters Help instead, see @ref{DEL Does Not Delete}.
......
......@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ uses the @key{option} key as the @key{META} key.
Most people should want to use the @key{command} key as the @key{META} key,
so that dead-key processing with the @key{option} key will still work. This is
useful for entering non-ASCII Latin characters directly from the Mac
useful for entering non-@acronym{ASCII} Latin characters directly from the Mac
keyboard, for example.
Emacs recognizes the setting in the Keyboard control panel and
......
......@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ the new position with point back at its original position.
@ref{Mark Ring}.
@kindex C-@@
There is no such character as @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} in ASCII; when you
There is no such character as @kbd{C-@key{SPC}} in @acronym{ASCII}; when you
type @key{SPC} while holding down @key{CTRL}, what you get on most
ordinary terminals is the character @kbd{C-@@}. This key is actually
bound to @code{set-mark-command}. But unless you are unlucky enough to
......
......@@ -526,9 +526,9 @@ before point in the shell buffer
@item C-d
@kindex C-d @r{(Shell mode)}
@findex comint-delchar-or-maybe-eof
Either delete a character or send @sc{eof}
Either delete a character or send @acronym{EOF}
(@code{comint-delchar-or-maybe-eof}). Typed at the end of the shell
buffer, @kbd{C-d} sends @sc{eof} to the subshell. Typed at any other
buffer, @kbd{C-d} sends @acronym{EOF} to the subshell. Typed at any other
position in the buffer, @kbd{C-d} deletes a character as usual.
@item C-c C-a
......@@ -1502,13 +1502,13 @@ printable using the fonts built into your printer. You can augment
the fonts supplied with the printer with those from the GNU Intlfonts
package, or you can instruct Emacs to use Intlfonts exclusively. The
variable @code{ps-multibyte-buffer} controls this: the default value,
@code{nil}, is appropriate for printing ASCII and Latin-1
@code{nil}, is appropriate for printing @acronym{ASCII} and Latin-1
characters; a value of @code{non-latin-printer} is for printers which
have the fonts for ASCII, Latin-1, Japanese, and Korean
have the fonts for @acronym{ASCII}, Latin-1, Japanese, and Korean
characters built into them. A value of @code{bdf-font} arranges for
the BDF fonts from the Intlfonts package to be used for @emph{all}
characters. Finally, a value of @code{bdf-font-except-latin}
instructs the printer to use built-in fonts for ASCII and Latin-1
instructs the printer to use built-in fonts for @acronym{ASCII} and Latin-1
characters, and Intlfonts BDF fonts for the rest.
@vindex bdf-directory-list
......@@ -1531,7 +1531,7 @@ identify a @dfn{sort key} for each record, and then reorder the records
into the order determined by the sort keys. The records are ordered so
that their keys are in alphabetical order, or, for numeric sorting, in
numeric order. In alphabetic sorting, all upper-case letters `A' through
`Z' come before lower-case `a', in accord with the ASCII character
`Z' come before lower-case `a', in accord with the @acronym{ASCII} character
sequence.
The various sort commands differ in how they divide the text into sort
......
......@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ the clipboard, and displays in the echo area a message to that effect.
@vindex dos-display-scancodes
The variable @code{dos-display-scancodes}, when non-@code{nil},
directs Emacs to display the ASCII value and the keyboard scan code of
directs Emacs to display the @acronym{ASCII} value and the keyboard scan code of
each keystroke; this feature serves as a complement to the
@code{view-lossage} command, for debugging.
......@@ -466,7 +466,7 @@ Windows to capture a specific printer port such as @code{"LPT2"}, and
redirect it to a networked printer via the @w{@code{Control
Panel->Printers}} applet instead of @samp{net use}.
Some printers expect DOS codepage encoding of non-ASCII text, even
Some printers expect DOS codepage encoding of non-@acronym{ASCII} text, even
though they are connected to a Windows machine which uses a different
encoding for the same locale. For example, in the Latin-1 locale, DOS
uses codepage 850 whereas Windows uses codepage 1252. @xref{MS-DOS and
......@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ Create a coding system for a certain DOS codepage.
MS-DOS is designed to support one character set of 256 characters at
any given time, but gives you a variety of character sets to choose
from. The alternative character sets are known as @dfn{DOS codepages}.
Each codepage includes all 128 ASCII characters, but the other 128
Each codepage includes all 128 @acronym{ASCII} characters, but the other 128
characters (codes 128 through 255) vary from one codepage to another.
Each DOS codepage is identified by a 3-digit number, such as 850, 862,
etc.
......@@ -614,7 +614,7 @@ executables on other systems such as MS-Windows.
@cindex unibyte operation @r{(MS-DOS)}
If you invoke Emacs on MS-DOS with the @samp{--unibyte} option
(@pxref{Initial Options}), Emacs does not perform any conversion of
non-ASCII characters. Instead, it reads and writes any non-ASCII
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters. Instead, it reads and writes any non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters verbatim, and sends their 8-bit codes to the display
verbatim. Thus, unibyte Emacs on MS-DOS supports the current codepage,
whatever it may be, but cannot even represent any other characters.
......@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ language environment for that script (@pxref{Language Environments}).
If a buffer contains a character belonging to some other ISO 8859
character set, not the one that the chosen DOS codepage supports, Emacs
displays it using a sequence of ASCII characters. For example, if the
displays it using a sequence of @acronym{ASCII} characters. For example, if the
current codepage doesn't have a glyph for the letter @samp{@`o} (small
@samp{o} with a grave accent), it is displayed as @samp{@{`o@}}, where
the braces serve as a visual indication that this is a single character.
......