Commit 7837f272 authored by Carsten Dominik's avatar Carsten Dominik
Browse files

Version 3.12

parent 9acdaa21
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
@setfilename ../info/org
@settitle Org Mode Manual
@set VERSION 3.11
@set VERSION 3.12
@set DATE June 2005
@dircategory Emacs
......@@ -109,8 +109,16 @@ Document Structure
Tables
* Built-in table editor:: Simple tables
* table.el:: Complex tables
* Table calculations:: Compute a field from other fields
* orgtbl-mode:: The table editor as minor mode
* table.el:: Complex tables
Calculations in tables
* Formula syntax:: How to write a formula
* Applying a formula:: How to get a formula executed
* Recalculation:: Re-applying all formulas in a table
* Summing:: Summing columns and rows
Hyperlinks
......@@ -203,6 +211,7 @@ different levels and in different ways, for example
@example
@r{@bullet{} as an outline extension with visibility cycling and structure editing}
@r{@bullet{} as an ASCII system and table editor to take structured notes}
@r{@bullet{} as an ASCII table editor with some spreadsheet-like capabilities}
@r{@bullet{} as a simple hypertext system, with HTML export}
@r{@bullet{} as a TODO list editor}
@r{@bullet{} as a full agenda and planner with deadlines and work scheduling}
......@@ -384,7 +393,7 @@ Note that inside tables, @kbd{S-@key{TAB}} jumps to the previous field.
Show all.
@end table
When Emacs firsts visits a Org-mode file, the global state is set to
When Emacs first visits an Org-mode file, the global state is set to
OVERVIEW, i.e. only the top level headlines are visible. This can be
configured through the variable @code{org-startup-folded}, or on a
per-file basis by adding one of the following lines anywhere in the
......@@ -435,9 +444,9 @@ visible.
@cindex promotion, of subtrees
@cindex demotion, of subtrees
@cindex subtree, cut and paste
@cindex pasting, subtrees
@cindex cutting, subtrees
@cindex copying, subtrees
@cindex pasting, of subtrees
@cindex cutting, of subtrees
@cindex copying, of subtrees
@table @kbd
@kindex M-@key{RET}
......@@ -493,11 +502,11 @@ functionality.
@section Archiving
@cindex archiving
When an project represented by a (sub)tree is finished, you may want
to move the tree to an Archive place, either in the same file under a
When a project represented by a (sub)tree is finished, you may want
to move the tree to an archive place, either in the same file under a
special top-level heading, or even to a different file.
@table @kbd
@kindex @kbd{C-c $}
@kindex C-c $
@item @kbd{C-c $}
Archive the subtree starting at the cursor position to the location
given by @code{org-archive-location}.
......@@ -524,7 +533,7 @@ An important feature of Org-mode is the ability to construct
sparse tree means that the entire document is folded as much as
possible, but the selected information is made visible along with the
headline structure above it@footnote{See also the variable
@code{org-show-following-heading}}. Just try it out and you will see
@code{org-show-following-heading}.}. Just try it out and you will see
immediately how it works.
Org-mode contains several commands creating such trees. The most
......@@ -549,7 +558,7 @@ C-v} creates a sparse TODO tree (@pxref{TODO basics}).
@cindex visible text, printing
To print a sparse tree, you can use the Emacs command
@code{ps-print-buffer-with-faces} which does not print invisible parts
of the document @footnote{this does not work under XEmacs, because
of the document @footnote{This does not work under XEmacs, because
XEmacs uses selective display for outlining, not text properties}.
Or you can use the command @kbd{C-c C-x v} to copy the visible part of
the document to another file (extension @file{.txt}) which then can be
......@@ -559,18 +568,18 @@ printed in any desired way.
@chapter Tables
@cindex tables
For taking notes, tables are an essential tool because they allow
immediate and clear structuring of data. Org-mode has a very fast and
intuitive table editor built-in. More complex tables can be created
with the Emacs table.el package.
Org-mode has a very fast and intuitive table editor built-in.
Spreadsheet-like calculations are supported in connection with the
Emacs @file{calc} package.
@menu
* Built-in table editor:: Simple tables
* table.el:: Complex tables
* Table calculations:: Compute a field from other fields
* orgtbl-mode:: The table editor as minor mode
* table.el:: Complex tables
@end menu
@node Built-in table editor, table.el, Tables, Tables
@node Built-in table editor, Table calculations, Tables, Tables
@section The built-in table editor
@cindex table editor, builtin
......@@ -587,13 +596,13 @@ like this:
@end example
A table is re-aligned automatically each time you press @key{TAB} or
@key{RET} inside the table. @key{TAB} also moves to the next field
(@key{RET} to the next row) and creates new table rows at the end of the
table or before horizontal lines. The indentation of the table is set
by the first line. Any line starting with @samp{|-} is considered as a
horizontal separator line and will be expanded on the next re-align to
span the whole table width. So, to create the above table, you would
only type
@key{RET} or @kbd{C-c C-c} inside the table. @key{TAB} also moves to
the next field (@key{RET} to the next row) and creates new table rows
at the end of the table or before horizontal lines. The indentation
of the table is set by the first line. Any line starting with
@samp{|-} is considered as a horizontal separator line and will be
expanded on the next re-align to span the whole table width. So, to
create the above table, you would only type
@example
|Name|Phone|Age
......@@ -605,10 +614,9 @@ fields.
@table @kbd
@tsubheading{Creation and conversion}
@kindex C-c C-c
@item C-c C-c
Recognize @file{table.el} table. Works when the cursor is in a
table.el table
@item M-x org-table-create
Creates an empty Org-mode table. However, it is much easier to just
start typing, like @kbd{|Name|Phone|Age @key{RET} |- @key{TAB}}
@kindex C-c C-c
@item C-c C-c
......@@ -619,10 +627,6 @@ separated. If not, lines are split at whitespace into fields. You
can use a prefix argument to indicate how many consecutive spaces are
at least required to indicate a field separator (default: just one).
@item M-x org-table-create
Creates an empty Org-mode table. However, it is much easier to just
start typing, like @kbd{|Name|Phone|Age @key{RET} |- @key{TAB}}
@tsubheading{Re-aligning and field motion}
@kindex C-c C-c
@item C-c C-c
......@@ -635,7 +639,7 @@ necessary.
@kindex S-@key{TAB}
@item S-@key{TAB}
Move to previous field.
Re-align, move to previous field.
@kindex @key{RET}
@item @key{RET}
......@@ -674,19 +678,19 @@ Insert a new row above (with arg: below) the current row.
@kindex C-c -
@item C-c -
Insert a horizontal line below current row. With prefix arg, line is
created above the current line.
Insert a horizontal line below current row. With prefix arg, the line
is created above the current line.
@tsubheading{Regions}
@kindex C-c C-h M-w
@item C-c C-h M-w
Copy an rectangular region from a table to a special clipboard. Point
Copy a rectangular region from a table to a special clipboard. Point
and mark determine edge fields of the rectangle. The process ignores
horizontal separator lines.
@kindex C-c C-h C-w
@item C-c C-h C-w
Copy an rectangular region from a table to a special clipboard, and
blank all fields in the rectangle.
Copy a rectangular region from a table to a special clipboard, and
blank all fields in the rectangle. So this is the ``cut'' operation.
@kindex C-c C-h C-y
@item C-c C-h C-y
Paste a rectangular region into a table.
......@@ -707,6 +711,29 @@ current field gets blank, and the content is appended to the field
above.
@tsubheading{Calculations}
@cindex formula, in tables
@cindex calculations, in tables
@kindex C-c =
@item C-c =
Replace current field with the result of a formula. When called with a
@kbd{C-u} prefix, apply the equation in the current field and down
through the current column to a horizonal separator line or the end of
the table. For details, see @ref{Table calculations}.
@kindex C-c *
@item C-c *
Recalculate the current row by applying the stored formulas from left
to right. When called with a @kbd{C-u} prefix, recalculate the
entire table, starting with the first non-header line (i.e. below the
first horizontal separator line). For details, see @ref{Table calculations}.
@kindex C-#
@item C-#
Rotate the recalculation mark in first column through the states
@samp{}, @samp{#}, @samp{*}, @samp{!}, @samp{$}. For the meaning of
these marks see @ref{Table calculations}. When there is an active
region, change all marks in the region.
@kindex C-c ?
@item C-c ?
Which table column is the cursor in? Displays number >0 in echo
......@@ -718,7 +745,7 @@ area.
@kindex C-c +
@item C-c +
Sum the numbers in the current column, or in the rectangle defined by
the active region. The result is displayed in the echo area and can
the active region. The result is shown in the echo area and can
be inserted with @kbd{C-y}.
@kindex S-@key{RET}
......@@ -730,23 +757,12 @@ along with it. Depending on the variable
incremented during copy. This key is also used by CUA-mode
(@pxref{Interaction}).
@cindex formula, in tables
@cindex calculations, in tables
@kindex C-c =
@item C-c =
Replace current field with the result of a formula. Requires the
Emacs calc package. The formula can access the current field with
@samp{$}, and the other fields in the current row
with @samp{$1}, @samp{$2},... For details see the documentation of the
command @command{org-table-eval-formula}.
@tsubheading{Miscellaneous}
@kindex C-c |
@item C-c |
Toggle the visibility of vertical lines in tables. The lines are
still there, only made invisible with a text property. Any @samp{|}
added by hand will become invisible on the next align.
Typographically it is good style to have no vertical lines in tables.
@item M-x org-table-import
Import a file as a table. The table should be TAB- or whitespace
......@@ -771,23 +787,231 @@ it off with
@noindent The only table command which then still works is
@kbd{C-c C-c} to do a manual re-align.
@node table.el, orgtbl-mode, Built-in table editor, Tables
@node Table calculations, orgtbl-mode, Built-in table editor, Tables
@section Calculations in tables
@cindex calculations, in tables
While the Org-mode table editor misses many features of a full
spreadsheet, it nevertheless has very useful capabilities to compute
fields. In horizontal direction, it can use complex expressions to
compute a field from other fields @emph{in the same row}, using named
columns, constants and parameters. The Emacs @file{calc} package is
required for this feature to work. In vertical direction, only
summing is supported.
@menu
* Formula syntax:: How to write a formula
* Applying a formula:: How to get a formula executed
* Recalculation:: Re-applying all formulas in a table
* Summing:: Summing columns and rows
@end menu
@node Formula syntax, Applying a formula, Table calculations, Table calculations
@subsection Formula syntax
A formula for horizontal computations can be any algebraic expression
understood by the Emacs @file{calc} package. Before evaluation,
variable substitution takes place: @samp{$} is replaced by the field
the cursor is currently in, and $1..$n reference the fields in the
current row. @samp{$name} is interpreted as the name of a column,
parameter or constant. Constants are defined globally through the
variable @code{org-table-formula-constants}. If you have the
@file{constants.el} package, it will also be used to resolve
constants, including natural constants like @samp{$k} for Plancks
constant, units like @samp{$km} for kilometers. Column names and
parameters can be specified in special table lines. These are
described below, see @ref{Recalculation}.
A formula can contain an optional mode string after a semicolon. This
string consists of flags to influence calc's modes@footnote{By
default, Org-mode uses the standard calc modes (precision 12, angular
units degrees, fraction and symbolic modes off). However, the display
format which has been changed to @code{(float 5)} to keep tables
compact. The default settings can be configured using the variable
@code{org-calc-default-modes}.} during execution, e.g. @samp{p20} to
switch the internal precision to 20 digits, @samp{n3}, @samp{s3},
@samp{e2} or @samp{f4} to switch to normal, scientific, engineering,
or fix display format, respectively, and @samp{D}, @samp{R}, @samp{F},
and @samp{S} to turn on degrees, radians, fraction and symbolic modes,
respectively. In addition, you may provide a @code{printf} specifier
to reformat the final result. A few examples:
@example
$1+$2 @r{Sum of first and second field}
$1+$2;%.2f @r{Same, format result to two decimals}
exp($2)+exp($1) @r{Math functions can be used}
$;%.1f @r{Reformat current cell to 1 decimal}
($3-32)*5/9 @r{degrees F -> C conversion}
$c/$1/$cm @r{Hz -> cm conversion, using @file{constants.el}}
tan($1);Dp3s1 @r{compute in degrees, precision 3, display SCI 1}
vmean($2..$7) @r{compute column range mean, using vector function}
taylor($3,x=7,2) @r{taylor series of $3, at x=7, second degree}
@end example
@node Applying a formula, Recalculation, Formula syntax, Table calculations
@subsection Applying a formula
To apply a formula to a field, type it directly into the field,
preceded by an equal sign, like @samp{=$1+$2}. When you press
@key{TAB} or @key{RET} or @kbd{C-c C-c} with the cursor still in the
field, the formula will be evaluated and replaced with the result. If
the field contains only @samp{=}, the formula most recently applied
anywhere in the @emph{same column} will be used.
For each column, Org-mode will remember the most recently used
formula. The information is stored in a special line directly below
the table. When adding/deleting/moving columns with the appropriate
commands, the stored equations will be modified accordingly. When a
column used in a calculation is removed, references to this column
become invalid and will cause an error upon applying the equation.
Instead of typing an equation into the field, you may also use the
command @kbd{C-c =}. It prompts for a formula (with default taken
from the @samp{#+TBLFM:} line) and applies it to the current field.
If you use a prefix argument (i.e. @kbd{C-u C-c =}), the formula will
be applied to the current field and down to the next separator line
or the end of the table. A numerical prefix will apply it to that
many fields in the current column.
When the evaluation of a formula leads to an error, the field content
becomes the string @samp{#ERROR}. If you would like see what is going
on during variable substitution and calculation in order to find a
bug, turn on formula debugging in the menu and repeat the calculation
by pressing, for example by pressing @kbd{C-c = @key{RET}} in a field.
Detailed information will be displayed.
@node Recalculation, Summing, Applying a formula, Table calculations
@subsection Recalculation
To recompute all the fields in a line, use the command @kbd{C-c *}.
It re-applies all stored equations to the current row, from left to
right. With a @kbd{C-u} prefix, this will be done to every line in
the table, so use this command it you want to make sure the entire
table is up-to-date. A more automatic way of recalculating the
current line requires marking the line: If the first column of a row
contains only @samp{#}, the row will be re-computed with every
@key{TAB}, @key{RET}, and @kbd{C-c C-c} in this row. Here is an
example of a table that collects exam results of students, with some
rows activated for semi-automatic computations.
@example
@group
|---+---------+--------+--------+--------+-------+------|
| | Student | Prob 1 | Prob 2 | Prob 3 | Total | Note |
|---+---------+--------+--------+--------+-------+------|
| ! | | P1 | P2 | P3 | Tot | |
| # | Maximum | 10 | 15 | 25 | 50 | 10.0 |
|---+---------+--------+--------+--------+-------+------|
| # | Peter | 10 | 8 | 23 | 41 | 8.2 |
| # | Sara | 7 | 14 | 19 | 40 | 8.0 |
| # | Sam | 2 | 4 | 3 | 9 | 1.8 |
|---+---------+--------+--------+--------+-------+------|
| $ | max=50 | | | | | |
|---+---------+--------+--------+--------+-------+------|
#+TBLFM: $6=vsum($P1..$P3)::$7=10*$Tot/$max;%.1f
@end group
@end example
@noindent
The example also demonstrates a number of convenience features:
@enumerate
@item
If the first field of a row contains only @samp{!}, this row defines
@emph{names} for the different columns so that you can write
@samp{$Tot} instead of @samp{$6} --- useful in larger tables,
when counting columns becomes error prone.
@item
If the first field of a row contains only @samp{$}, fields in this row
can define @emph{parameters} for formulas. For example, if a field in
a @samp{$} row contains @samp{max=50}, then formulas in this table can
refer to the value 50 using @samp{$max}. Parameters work exactly like
constants, only that they can be defined on a per-table basis.
Changing a parameter and then recalculating the table can be useful
and fun.
@item
A column range @samp{$P1..$P3} is expanded to a vector, so that calc's
vector functions (in this case @samp{vsum}, but there are many more)
can be applied to ranges. For a range, columns may be referenced by
name or number, in either sequence.
@end enumerate
@noindent If a table contains any line with @samp{#} as the
first field, @kbd{C-u C-c *} will only change the marked lines and
leave all unmarked lines alone. You can also mark a line with
@samp{*}. These lines will also be recalculated with @kbd{C-u C-c *},
but not upon @key{TAB} and @key{RET}. Use this for lines which are
slow to calculate.
Just to wet your appetite on what can be done with the fantastic
@file{calc} package, here is a table that computes the Taylor series
for a couple of functions (homework: try that with Excel :-)
@example
@group
|---+-------------+---+-----+--------------------------------------|
| | Func | n | x | Result |
|---+-------------+---+-----+--------------------------------------|
| # | exp(x) | 1 | x | 1 + x |
| # | exp(x) | 2 | x | 1 + x + x^2 / 2 |
| # | exp(x) | 3 | x | 1 + x + x^2 / 2 + x^3 / 6 |
| # | x^2+sqrt(x) | 2 | x=0 | x*(0.5 / 0) + x^2 (2 - 0.25 / 0) / 2 |
| # | x^2+sqrt(x) | 2 | x=1 | 2 + 2.5 x - 2.5 + 0.875 (x - 1)^2 |
| * | tan(x) | 3 | x | 0.0175 x + 1.77e-6 x^3 |
|---+-------------+---+-----+--------------------------------------|
#+TBLFM: $5=taylor($2,$4,$3);n3
@end group
@end example
@node Summing, , Recalculation, Table calculations
@subsection Summing
Finally, when typing a formula into a field, a number of special
keywords execute predefined sums over the current row or column and
enter the result into the current field. These calculations are
one-off, the formula is not stored, and you will neet to re-enter it
in order to compute again.
@example
= @r{Execute the stored formula valid in this column.}
=sum @r{Sum all fields above the current (alias @code{=sumv}).}
=sumh @r{Sum all fields to the left of the current field.}
=sum3 @r{Same as @samp{=sum}, but use just 3 fields above current.}
@end example
@node orgtbl-mode, table.el, Table calculations, Tables
@section The Orgtbl minor mode
@cindex orgtbl-mode
@cindex minor mode for tables
If you like the intuitive way the Org-mode table editor works, you
might want to use it also in other modes like text-mode or mail-mode.
The minor mode Orgtbl-mode makes this possible. You can always toggle
the mode with @kbd{M-x orgtbl-mode}. To turn it on by default, for
example in mail mode, use
@lisp
(add-hook 'mail-mode-hook 'turn-on-orgtbl)
@end lisp
@node table.el, , orgtbl-mode, Tables
@section The @file{table.el} package
@kindex C-c C-c
@cindex table editor, table.el
@cindex table editor, @file{table.el}
@cindex @file{table.el}
More complex ASCII tables (with automatic line wrapping, column- and
row-spanning, and alignment) can be created using the Emacs table
Complex ASCII tables with automatic line wrapping, column- and
row-spanning, and alignment can be created using the Emacs table
package by Takaaki Ota (@uref{http://sourceforge.net/projects/table}).
When @key{TAB} or @kbd{C-c C-c} is pressed in such a table, Org-mode
will call @command{table-recognize-table} and move the cursor into the
table. Inside a table, the keymap of Org-mode is inactive. In order
to execute org-related commands, leave the table.
to execute Org-mode-related commands, leave the table.
@table @kbd
@kindex C-c #
@item C-c #
@kindex C-c C-c
@item C-c C-c
Recognize @file{table.el} table. Works when the cursor is in a
table.el table.
@kindex C-c ~
@item C-c ~
Insert a table.el table. If there is already a table at point, this
command converts it between the table.el format and the Org-mode
format. See the documentation string of the command
......@@ -795,20 +1019,6 @@ format. See the documentation string of the command
possible.
@end table
@node orgtbl-mode, , table.el, Tables
@section The Orgtbl minor mode
@cindex orgtbl-mode
@cindex Minor mode for tables
If you like the intuitive way the Org-mode table editor works, you
might want to use it also in other modes like text-mode or mail-mode.
The minor mode Orgtbl-mode makes this possible. You can always toggle
the mode with @kbd{M-x orgtbl-mode}. To turn it on by default, for
example in mail mode, use
@lisp
(add-hook 'mail-mode-hook 'turn-on-orgtbl)
@end lisp
@node Hyperlinks, TODO items, Tables, Top
@chapter Hyperlinks
@cindex hyperlinks
......@@ -826,6 +1036,8 @@ articles, emails and much more.
@cindex links
@cindex GNUS links
@cindex BBDB links
@cindex URL links
@cindex file links
@cindex VM links
@cindex RMAIL links
@cindex WANDERLUST links
......@@ -877,6 +1089,8 @@ The key binding @kbd{C-c l} is only a suggestion - see
@ref{Installation and Activation}.
@kindex C-c C-l
@cindex completion, of links
@cindex completion, of file names
@item C-c C-l
Insert a link. This prompts for a link to be inserted into the
buffer. You can just type a link, using one of the link type prefixes
......@@ -969,8 +1183,8 @@ Before inserting the text into a tree, the function ensures that the
text has a headline, i.e. a first line that starts with a @samp{*}.
If not, a headline is constructed from the current date and some
additional data. If the variable @code{org-adapt-indentation} is
non-@code{nil}, the entire text is also indented so that it starts in
the same column as the headline (after the asterisks).
non-nil, the entire text is also indented so that it starts in the
same column as the headline (after the asterisks).
@node TODO items, Timestamps, Hyperlinks, Top
@chapter TODO items
......@@ -1057,6 +1271,7 @@ of working on an item, for example
org-todo-interpretation 'sequence)
@end lisp
@cindex completion, of TODO keywords
With this setup, the command @kbd{C-c C-t} will cycle an entry from
TODO to FEEDBACK, then to VERIFY, and finally too DONE. You may also
use a prefix argument to quickly select a specific state. For example
......@@ -1084,9 +1299,9 @@ would be set up like this:
In this case, different keywords do not indicate a sequence, but
rather different types. So it is normally not useful to change from
one type to another. Therefore, in this case the the behavior of the
one type to another. Therefore, in this case the behavior of the
command @kbd{C-c C-t} is changed slightly@footnote{This is also true
for the @kbd{t} command in the timeline and agenda buffers}. When
for the @kbd{t} command in the timeline and agenda buffers.}. When
used several times in succession, it will still cycle through all
names. But when when you return to the item after some time and
execute @kbd{C-c C-t} again, it will switch from each name directly to
......@@ -1111,7 +1326,7 @@ anywhere in the file:
#+TYP_TODO: Fred Sara Lucy Mike DONE
@end example
@cindex Completing option keywords
@cindex Completion, of option keywords
@kindex M-@key{TAB}
@noindent To make sure you are using the correct keyword, type
@samp{#+} into the buffer and then use @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} completion.
......@@ -1171,7 +1386,7 @@ agenda buffer with the @kbd{,} command (@pxref{Agenda commands}).
@itemx S-@key{down}
Increase/decrease priority of current item. Note that these keys are
also used to modify time stamps (@pxref{Creating timestamps}).
Furthermore, these keys is also used by CUA-mode
Furthermore, these keys are also used by CUA-mode
(@pxref{Interaction}).
@end table
......@@ -1221,27 +1436,27 @@ example:
@end example
@item DEADLINE
@cindex deadline
@cindex DEADLINE keyword
If a time stamp is preceded by the word @samp{DEADLINE:}, the task
(most likely a TODO item) is supposed to be finished on that date, and
it will be listed then. In addition, the compilation for the
@emph{current day} will carry a warning about the approaching or
missed deadline, starting @code{org-deadline-warning-days} before the
due date, and continuing until the entry is marked DONE. An example:
it will be listed then. In addition, the compilation for @emph{today}
will carry a warning about the approaching or missed deadline,
starting @code{org-deadline-warning-days} before the due date, and
continuing until the entry is marked DONE. An example:
@example
*** TODO write article about the Earth for the Guide
The editor in charge is bbdb:Ford Prefect
The editor in charge is <bbdb:Ford Prefect>
DEADLINE: <2004-02-29 Sun>
@end example
@item SCHEDULED
@cindex scheduled
@cindex DEADLINE keyword
If a time stamp is preceded by the word @samp{SCHEDULED:}, it means
you are planning to start working on that task on the given date. The
headline will be listed under the given date. In addition, a reminder
that the scheduled date has passed will be present in the compilation
for the @emph{current day}, until the entry is marked DONE. I.e., the
for the @emph{today}, until the entry is marked DONE. I.e., the
task will automatically be forwarded.
@end table
......@@ -1310,7 +1525,7 @@ CUA-mode (@pxref{Interaction}).
Change the item under the cursor in a timestamp. The cursor can be on
a year, month, day, hour or minute. Note that if the cursor is not at
a time stamp, these same keys modify the priority of an item.
(@pxref{Priorities}). These key bindings conflict with CUA-mode
(@pxref{Priorities}). The key bindings also conflict with CUA-mode
(@pxref{Interaction}).
......@@ -1325,9 +1540,9 @@ into the following column).
@cindex date, reading in minibuffer
@cindex time, reading in minibuffer
@cindex calendar, for selecting date
When org prompts for a date/time, the function reading your input will
replace anything you choose not to specify with the current date and
time. For details, see the documentation string of
When Org-mode prompts for a date/time, the function reading your input
will replace anything you choose not to specify with the current date
and time. For details, see the documentation string of
@command{org-read-date}. Also, a calender will pop up to allow
selecting a date. The calendar can be fully controlled from the
minibuffer, and a date can be selected with the following commands:
......@@ -1487,12 +1702,12 @@ Emacs.
The display in the agenda buffer looks best if the category is not
longer than 10 characters.