Commit 7847b2a1 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

Remove documentation for Refill and Longlines modes.

These will be obsoleted in a future version of Emacs.

* text.texi (Refill, Longlines): Delete nodes.

* ack.texi (Acknowledgments): Longlines removed from manual.

* emacs.texi (Top): Update node listing.
parent 91064207
2011-07-10 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* text.texi (Refill, Longlines): Delete nodes.
* ack.texi (Acknowledgments): Longlines removed from manual.
* emacs.texi (Top): Update node listing.
2011-07-09 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* fortran-xtra.texi (Fortran): Update handled extensions.
......
......@@ -190,9 +190,7 @@ prior to Emacs 23 for Mac OS.
@item
Chong Yidong was the Emacs co-maintainer for Emacs 23. He made many
improvements to the Emacs display engine; and, together with Kai
Großjohann and Alex Schroeder, wrote @file{longlines.el}, a minor
mode for wrapping long lines.
improvements to the Emacs display engine.
@item
James Clark wrote SGML mode, a mode for editing SGML documents; and
......@@ -689,14 +687,12 @@ the current window on which point is; @file{cap-words.el}, a minor mode
for motion in ``CapitalizedWordIdentifiers''; @file{latin1-disp.el}, a
package that lets you display ISO 8859 characters on Latin-1 terminals
by setting up appropriate display tables; @file{python.el}, a major mode
for the Python programming language; @file{refill.el}, a mode for
automatic paragraph refilling, akin to typical word processors;
@file{smiley.el}, a facility for displaying smiley faces;
@file{sym-comp.el}, a library for performing mode-dependent symbol
completion; @file{benchmark.el} for timing code execution; and
@file{tool-bar.el}, a mode to control the display of the Emacs tool bar.
With Riccardo Murri he wrote @file{vc-bzr.el}, support for the Bazaar
version control system.
for the Python programming language; @file{smiley.el}, a facility for
displaying smiley faces; @file{sym-comp.el}, a library for performing
mode-dependent symbol completion; @file{benchmark.el} for timing code
execution; and @file{tool-bar.el}, a mode to control the display of
the Emacs tool bar. With Riccardo Murri he wrote @file{vc-bzr.el},
support for the Bazaar version control system.
@item
Eric Ludlam wrote the Speedbar package; @file{checkdoc.el}, for checking
......
......@@ -585,8 +585,6 @@ Filling Text
* Fill Prefix:: Filling paragraphs that are indented
or in a comment, etc.
* Adaptive Fill:: How Emacs can determine the fill prefix automatically.
* Refill:: Keeping paragraphs filled.
* Longlines:: Editing text with very long lines.
Outline Mode
......
......@@ -406,8 +406,6 @@ Text}).
* Fill Commands:: Commands to refill paragraphs and center lines.
* Fill Prefix:: Filling paragraphs that are indented or in a comment, etc.
* Adaptive Fill:: How Emacs can determine the fill prefix automatically.
* Refill:: Keeping paragraphs filled.
* Longlines:: Editing text with very long lines.
@end menu
@node Auto Fill
......@@ -722,92 +720,6 @@ line, and it should return the appropriate fill prefix based on that
line. If it returns @code{nil}, @code{adaptive-fill-regexp} gets
a chance to find a prefix.
@node Refill
@subsection Refill Mode
@cindex refilling text, word processor style
@cindex modes, Refill
@cindex Refill minor mode
Refill minor mode provides support for keeping paragraphs filled as
you type or modify them in other ways. It provides an effect similar
to typical word processor behavior. This works by running a
paragraph-filling command at suitable times.
To toggle the use of Refill mode in the current buffer, type
@kbd{M-x refill-mode}. When you are typing text, only characters
which normally trigger auto filling, like the space character, will
trigger refilling. This is to avoid making it too slow. Apart from
self-inserting characters, other commands which modify the text cause
refilling.
The current implementation is preliminary and not robust. You can
get better ``line wrapping'' behavior using Longlines mode.
@xref{Longlines}. However, Longlines mode has an important
side-effect: the newlines that it inserts for you are not saved to
disk, so the files that you make with Longlines mode will appear to be
completely unfilled if you edit them without Longlines mode.
@node Longlines
@subsection Long Lines Mode
@cindex refilling text, word processor style
@cindex modes, Long Lines
@cindex word wrap
@cindex Long Lines minor mode
Sometimes, you may come across ``unfilled'' text files, which Emacs
normally displays as a bunch of extremely long lines. Comfortably
reading and editing such files normally requires ``word wrap'', a
feature that breaks up each long text line into multiple screen lines
in a readable manner---by putting the breaks at word boundaries. Many
text editors, such as those built into many web browsers, perform word
wrapping by default.
There are two different minor modes in Emacs that perform word
wrapping. The first is Visual Line mode, which does it by altering
the behavior of screen line continuation. @xref{Visual Line Mode},
for information about Visual Line mode.
@findex longlines-mode
Instead of using Visual Line mode, you can use a minor mode called
Long Lines mode. Long Lines mode wraps lines by inserting or deleting
@dfn{soft newlines} as you type (@pxref{Hard and Soft Newlines}).
These soft newlines won't show up when you save the buffer into a
file, or when you copy the text into the kill ring, clipboard, or a
register. Unlike Visual Line mode, Lone Lines mode breaks long lines
at the fill column (@pxref{Fill Commands}), rather than the right
window edge. To enable Long Lines mode, type @kbd{M-x
longlines-mode}. If the text is full of long lines, this also
immediately ``wraps'' them all.
@findex longlines-auto-wrap
The word wrap performed by Long Lines mode is @emph{not} the same as
ordinary filling (@pxref{Fill Commands}). It does not contract
multiple spaces into a single space, recognize fill prefixes
(@pxref{Fill Prefix}), or perform adaptive filling (@pxref{Adaptive
Fill}). The reason for this is that a wrapped line is still,
conceptually, a single line. Each soft newline is equivalent to
exactly one space in that long line, and vice versa. However, you can
still call filling functions such as @kbd{M-q}, and these will work as
expected, inserting soft newlines that won't show up on disk or when
the text is copied. You can even rely entirely on the normal fill
commands by turning off automatic line wrapping, with @kbd{C-u M-x
longlines-auto-wrap}. To turn automatic line wrapping back on, type
@kbd{M-x longlines-auto-wrap}.
@findex longlines-show-hard-newlines
Type @kbd{RET} to insert a hard newline, one which automatic
refilling will not remove. If you want to see where all the hard
newlines are, type @kbd{M-x longlines-show-hard-newlines}. This will
mark each hard newline with a special symbol. The same command with a
prefix argument turns this display off.
Long Lines mode does not change normal text files that are already
filled, since the existing newlines are considered hard newlines.
Before Long Lines can do anything, you need to transform each
paragraph into a long line. One way is to set @code{fill-column} to a
large number (e.g., @kbd{C-u 9999 C-x f}), re-fill all the paragraphs,
and then set @code{fill-column} back to its original value.
@node Case
@section Case Conversion Commands
@cindex case conversion
......
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