Commit 78608595 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
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entered into RCS

parent 59ac2ce6
......@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ This function clears and redisplays all visible frames.
Some terminal emulators record separate contents for display-oriented
programs such as Emacs and for ordinary sequential display. If you are
using such a terminal, you might want to inhibit the redisplay on
resumption. @xref{Suspending Emacs}.
resumption.
@defvar no-redraw-on-reenter
@cindex suspend (cf. @code{no-redraw-on-reenter})
......@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ input has been processed.
@cindex display columns
@cindex resize redisplay
The screen size functions report or tell Emacs the height or width of
The screen size functions access or specify the height or width of
the terminal. When you are using multiple frames, they apply to the
selected frame (@pxref{Frames}).
......@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ choice of lines to hide is made automatically based on indentation.
This variant is designed as a user-level feature.
The way you control explicit selective display is by replacing a
newline (control-j) with a carriage return (control-m). The text which
newline (control-j) with a carriage return (control-m). The text that
was formerly a line following that newline is now invisible. Strictly
speaking, it is temporarily no longer a line at all, since only newlines
can separate lines; it is now part of the previous line.
......@@ -350,18 +350,19 @@ interface to debuggers, the overlay arrow indicates the line of code
about to be executed.
@defvar overlay-arrow-string
This variable holds the string to display as an arrow, or @code{nil} if
the arrow feature is not in use.
This variable holds the string to display to call attention to a
particular line, or @code{nil} if the arrow feature is not in use.
@end defvar
@defvar overlay-arrow-position
This variable holds a marker which indicates where to display the arrow.
It should point at the beginning of a line. The arrow text appears at
the beginning of that line, overlaying any text that would otherwise
appear. Since the arrow is usually short, and the line usually begins
with indentation, normally nothing significant is overwritten.
The overlay string is displayed only in the buffer which this marker
This variable holds a marker that indicates where to display the overlay
arrow. It should point at the beginning of a line. The arrow text
appears at the beginning of that line, overlaying any text that would
otherwise appear. Since the arrow is usually short, and the line
usually begins with indentation, normally nothing significant is
overwritten.
The overlay string is displayed only in the buffer that this marker
points into. Thus, only one buffer can have an overlay arrow at any
given time.
@c !!! overlay-arrow-position: but the overlay string may remain in the display
......@@ -419,7 +420,7 @@ The value of the last form in @var{forms} is returned.
@end defspec
@defvar temp-buffer-show-function
If this variable, if non-@code{nil}, @code{with-output-to-temp-buffer}
If this variable is non-@code{nil}, @code{with-output-to-temp-buffer}
calls it as a function to do the job of displaying a help buffer. The
function gets one argument, which is the buffer it should display.
......@@ -483,7 +484,7 @@ Type RET when done reading
@cindex overlays
You can use @dfn{overlays} to alter the appearance of a buffer's text on
the screen. An overlay is an object which belongs to a particular
the screen. An overlay is an object that belongs to a particular
buffer, and has a specified beginning and end. It also has properties
that you can examine and set; these affect the display of the text
within the overlay.
......@@ -602,7 +603,7 @@ overlay properties and text properties for a given character.
overlays, and to examine their contents.
@defun make-overlay start end &optional buffer
This function creates and returns an overlay which belongs to
This function creates and returns an overlay that belongs to
@var{buffer} and ranges from @var{start} to @var{end}. Both @var{start}
and @var{end} must specify buffer positions; they may be integers or
markers. If @var{buffer} is omitted, the overlay is created in the
......@@ -735,7 +736,7 @@ face.
@item
With text properties. A character may have a @code{face} property; if so,
it's displayed with that face. @xref{Special Properties}.
it is displayed with that face. @xref{Special Properties}.
If the character has a @code{mouse-face} property, that is used instead
of the @code{face} property when the mouse is ``near enough'' to the
......@@ -803,8 +804,8 @@ new frames.
@defun set-face-foreground face color &optional frame
@defunx set-face-background face color &optional frame
These functions set the foreground (respectively, background) color of
face @var{face} to @var{color}. The argument @var{color} should be a
These functions set the foreground (or background, respectively) color
of face @var{face} to @var{color}. The argument @var{color} should be a
string, the name of a color.
@end defun
......@@ -821,7 +822,8 @@ Non-@code{nil} means do underline; @code{nil} means don't.
@defun invert-face face &optional frame
Swap the foreground and background colors of face @var{face}. If the
face doesn't specify both foreground and background, then its foreground
and background are set to the default background and foreground.
and background are set to the default background and foreground,
respectively.
@end defun
These functions examine the attributes of a face. If you don't
......@@ -829,8 +831,8 @@ specify @var{frame}, they refer to the default data for new frames.
@defun face-foreground face &optional frame
@defunx face-background face &optional frame
These functions return the foreground (respectively, background) color
of face @var{face}, as a string.
These functions return the foreground color (or background color,
respectively) of face @var{face}, as a string.
@end defun
@defun face-font face &optional frame
......@@ -970,7 +972,7 @@ Character code 10 is a newline.
@item
All other codes in the range 0 through 31, and code 127, display in one
of two ways according to the value of @code{ctl-arrow}. If it is is
of two ways according to the value of @code{ctl-arrow}. If it is
non-@code{nil}, these codes map to sequences of two glyphs, where the
first glyph is the @sc{ASCII} code for @samp{^}. (A display table can
specify a glyph to use instead of @samp{^}.) Otherwise, these codes map
......@@ -1183,10 +1185,10 @@ set, you can arrange to use that character set as follows:
@end example
If you are editing buffers written in the ISO Latin 1 character set and
your terminal doesn't handle anything but @sc{ASCII}, you can load the file
@file{iso-ascii} to set up a display table which makes the other ISO
characters display as sequences of @sc{ASCII} characters. For example, the
character ``o with umlaut'' displays as @samp{@{"o@}}.
your terminal doesn't handle anything but @sc{ASCII}, you can load the
file @file{iso-ascii} to set up a display table that displays the other
ISO characters as explanatory sequences of @sc{ASCII} characters. For
example, the character ``o with umlaut'' displays as @samp{@{"o@}}.
Some European countries have terminals that don't support ISO Latin 1
but do support the special characters for that country's language. You
......
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
@chapter Operating System Interface
This chapter is about starting and getting out of Emacs, access to
values in the operating system environment, and terminal input, output
values in the operating system environment, and terminal input, output,
and flow control.
@xref{Building Emacs}, for related information. See also
......@@ -71,15 +71,15 @@ It loads the library @file{site-start}, unless the option
@item
It loads the file @file{~/.emacs} unless @samp{-q} was specified on
command line. (This is not done in @samp{-batch} mode.) The @samp{-u}
the command line. (This is not done in @samp{-batch} mode.) The @samp{-u}
option can specify the user name whose home directory should be used
instead of @file{~}.
@item
It loads the library @file{default} unless @code{inhibit-default-init}
is non-@code{nil}. (This is not done in @samp{-batch} mode or if
@samp{-q} was specified on command line.) The library's file name is
usually @file{default.el}.
@samp{-q} was specified on the command line.) The library's file name
is usually @file{default.el}.
@cindex @file{default.el}
@item
......@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ specify.
It runs @code{window-setup-hook}. @xref{Window Systems}.
@item
It displays copyleft, nonwarranty and basic use information, provided
It displays copyleft, nonwarranty, and basic use information, provided
there were no remaining command line arguments (a few steps above) and
the value of @code{inhibit-startup-message} is @code{nil}.
@end enumerate
......@@ -260,7 +260,7 @@ your @file{.emacs} file: @code{(setq term-file-prefix nil)}.
@end defvar
@defvar term-setup-hook
This variable is a normal hook which Emacs runs after loading your
This variable is a normal hook that Emacs runs after loading your
@file{.emacs} file, the default initialization file (if any) and the
terminal-specific Lisp file.
......@@ -300,9 +300,9 @@ kill the Emacs until you are about to log out.)
@end ignore
@defun command-line
This function parses the command line which Emacs was called with,
This function parses the command line that Emacs was called with,
processes it, loads the user's @file{.emacs} file and displays the
initial nonwarranty information, etc.
startup messages.
@end defun
@defvar command-line-processed
......@@ -359,7 +359,7 @@ to Emacs.
This variable's value is a list of functions for handling an
unrecognized command-line argument. Each time the next argument to be
processed has no special meaning, the functions in this list are called,
in the order they appear, until one of them returns a non-@code{nil}
in order of appearance, until one of them returns a non-@code{nil}
value.
These functions are called with no arguments. They can access the
......@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ normal hook; its value was a single function, and if its value was
non-@code{nil}, then @code{suspend-emacs} returned immediately without
actually suspending anything.
After the user resumes Emacs, it runs the normal hook
After the user resumes Emacs, @code{suspend-emacs} runs the normal hook
@code{suspend-resume-hook}. @xref{Hooks}.
The next redisplay after resumption will redraw the entire screen,
......@@ -665,11 +665,12 @@ invoked, or perhaps @code{nil} if that directory cannot be determined.
If non-@code{nil}, this is a directory within which to look for the
@file{lib-src} and @file{etc} subdirectories. This is non-@code{nil}
when Emacs can't find those directories in their standard installed
locations, but can find them near where the Emacs executable was found.
locations, but can find them in a directory related somehow to the one
containing the Emacs executable.
@end defvar
@defun load-average
This function returns the current 1 minute, 5 minute and 15 minute
This function returns the current 1-minute, 5-minute and 15-minute
load averages in a list. The values are integers that are 100 times
the system load averages. (The load averages indicate the number of
processes trying to run.)
......@@ -793,7 +794,7 @@ integers: @code{(@var{high} @var{low} @var{microsec})}. The integers
@var{high} * 2**16 + @var{low}.
@end ifinfo
@tex
$high*-2^{16}+low$.
$high*2^{16}+low$.
@end tex
The third element, @var{microsec}, gives the microseconds since the
......@@ -861,7 +862,13 @@ seconds.
The argument @var{repeat} specifies how often to repeat the call. If
@var{repeat} is @code{nil}, there are no repetitions; @var{function} is
called just once, at @var{time}. If @var{repeat} is an integer, it
specifies a repetition period measured in seconds.
specifies a repetition period measured in seconds. In any case, @var{repeat}
has no effect on when @emph{first} call takes place---@var{time} specifies
that.
The function @code{run-at-time} returns a timer value that identifies
the particular scheduled future action. You can use this value to call
@code{cancel-timer}.
@end defun
@defun cancel-timer timer
......@@ -897,7 +904,7 @@ This function sets the mode for reading keyboard input. If
@code{nil}, then it uses @sc{cbreak} mode.
If @var{flow} is non-@code{nil}, then Emacs uses @sc{xon/xoff} (@kbd{C-q},
@kbd{C-s}) flow control for output to terminal. This has no effect except
@kbd{C-s}) flow control for output to the terminal. This has no effect except
in @sc{cbreak} mode. @xref{Flow Control}.
The default setting is system dependent. Some systems always use
......@@ -1039,9 +1046,9 @@ or enlarges the translate table if necessary.
@end defun
@defvar function-key-map
This variable holds a keymap which describes the character sequences
This variable holds a keymap that describes the character sequences
sent by function keys on an ordinary character terminal. This keymap
uses the data structure as other keymaps, but is used differently: it
uses the same data structure as other keymaps, but is used differently: it
specifies translations to make while reading events.
If @code{function-key-map} ``binds'' a key sequence @var{k} to a vector
......@@ -1145,7 +1152,7 @@ from the keyboard or mouse. All input events are included, whether or
not they were used as parts of key sequences. Thus, you always get the
last 100 inputs, not counting keyboard macros. (Events from keyboard
macros are excluded because they are less interesting for debugging; it
should be enough to see the events which invoked the macros.)
should be enough to see the events that invoked the macros.)
@end defun
@deffn Command open-dribble-file filename
......@@ -1185,7 +1192,7 @@ This variable's value is the output speed of the terminal, as far as
Emacs knows. Setting this variable does not change the speed of actual
data transmission, but the value is used for calculations such as
padding. It also affects decisions about whether to scroll part of the
screen or repaint---even when using a window system, (We designed it
screen or repaint---even when using a window system. (We designed it
this way despite the fact that a window system has no true ``output
speed'', to give you a way to tune these decisions.)
......@@ -1336,7 +1343,7 @@ system to handle flow control, with @code{(set-input-mode nil t)}.
@item
It sets up @code{keyboard-translate-table} to translate @kbd{C-\} and
@kbd{C-^} into @kbd{C-s} and @kbd{C-q} were typed. Except at its very
@kbd{C-^} into @kbd{C-s} and @kbd{C-q}. Except at its very
lowest level, Emacs never knows that the characters typed were anything
but @kbd{C-s} and @kbd{C-q}, so you can in effect type them as @kbd{C-\}
and @kbd{C-^} even when they are input for other commands.
......
......@@ -492,7 +492,7 @@ were given to the program.
@defun process-id process
This function returns the @sc{pid} of @var{process}. This is an
integer which distinguishes the process @var{process} from all other
integer that distinguishes the process @var{process} from all other
processes running on the same computer at the current time. The
@sc{pid} of a process is chosen by the operating system kernel when the
process is started and remains constant as long as the process exists.
......@@ -665,7 +665,7 @@ process associated with the current buffer. An error is signaled if
The argument @var{current-group} is a flag that makes a difference
when you are running a job-control shell as an Emacs subprocess. If it
is non-@code{nil}, then the signal is sent to the current process-group
of the terminal which Emacs uses to communicate with the subprocess. If
of the terminal that Emacs uses to communicate with the subprocess. If
the process is a job-control shell, this means the shell's current
subjob. If it is @code{nil}, the signal is sent to the process group of
the immediate subprocess of Emacs. If the subprocess is a job-control
......@@ -731,7 +731,9 @@ to send; it should be an integer.
There are two ways to receive the output that a subprocess writes to
its standard output stream. The output can be inserted in a buffer,
which is called the associated buffer of the process, or a function
called the @dfn{filter function} can be called to act on the output.
called the @dfn{filter function} can be called to act on the output. If
the process has no buffer and no filter function, its output is
discarded.
@menu
* Process Buffers:: If no filter, output is put in a buffer.
......@@ -753,11 +755,9 @@ be sent to the process, but this is not built into Emacs Lisp.
Unless the process has a filter function (@pxref{Filter Functions}),
its output is inserted in the associated buffer. The position to insert
the output is determined by the @code{process-mark} (@pxref{Process
Information}), which is then updated to point to the end of the text
just inserted. Usually, but not always, the @code{process-mark} is at
the end of the buffer. If the process has no buffer and no filter
function, its output is discarded.
the output is determined by the @code{process-mark}, which is then
updated to point to the end of the text just inserted. Usually, but not
always, the @code{process-mark} is at the end of the buffer.
@defun process-buffer process
This function returns the associated buffer of the process
......@@ -823,9 +823,9 @@ subprocess with a @code{SIGHUP} signal (@pxref{Signals to Processes}).
A process @dfn{filter function} is a function that receives the
standard output from the associated process. If a process has a filter,
then @emph{all} output from that process, that would otherwise have been
in a buffer, is passed to the filter. The process buffer is used
directly for output from the process only when there is no filter.
then @emph{all} output from that process is passed to the filter. The
process buffer is used directly for output from the process only when
there is no filter.
A filter function must accept two arguments: the associated process and
a string, which is the output. The function is then free to do whatever it
......@@ -835,9 +835,10 @@ chooses with the output.
input, or for time to elapse, or for process output). This avoids the
timing errors that could result from running filters at random places in
the middle of other Lisp programs. You may explicitly cause Emacs to
wait, so that filter functions will run, by calling @code{sit-for},
@code{sleep-for} or @code{accept-process-output} (@pxref{Accepting
Output}). Emacs is also waiting when the command loop is reading input.
wait, so that filter functions will run, by calling @code{sit-for} or
@code{sleep-for} (@pxref{Waiting}), or @code{accept-process-output}
(@pxref{Accepting Output}). Emacs is also waiting when the command loop
is reading input.
Quitting is normally inhibited within a filter function---otherwise,
the effect of typing @kbd{C-g} at command level or to quit a user
......@@ -1037,9 +1038,9 @@ of event.
or for time to elapse, or for process output). This avoids the timing
errors that could result from running them at random places in the
middle of other Lisp programs. A program can wait, so that sentinels
will run, by calling @code{sit-for}, @code{sleep-for} or
@code{accept-process-output} (@pxref{Accepting Output}). Emacs is also
waiting when the command loop is reading input.
will run, by calling @code{sit-for} or @code{sleep-for}
(@pxref{Waiting}), or @code{accept-process-output} (@pxref{Accepting
Output}). Emacs is also waiting when the command loop is reading input.
Quitting is normally inhibited within a sentinel---otherwise, the
effect of typing @kbd{C-g} at command level or to quit a user command
......@@ -1103,7 +1104,7 @@ you can call @code{tq-enqueue} to send a transaction.
This function creates and returns a transaction queue communicating with
@var{process}. The argument @var{process} should be a subprocess
capable of sending and receiving streams of bytes. It may be a child
process, or it may be a TCP connection to a server possibly on another
process, or it may be a TCP connection to a server, possibly on another
machine.
@end defun
......@@ -1111,7 +1112,7 @@ machine.
This function sends a transaction to queue @var{queue}. Specifying the
queue has the effect of specifying the subprocess to talk to.
The argument @var{question} is the outgoing message which starts the
The argument @var{question} is the outgoing message that starts the
transaction. The argument @var{fn} is the function to call when the
corresponding answer comes back; it is called with two arguments:
@var{closure}, and the answer received.
......
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