Commit 7dd3d99f authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

*** empty log message ***

parent 13da0554
......@@ -956,6 +956,8 @@ message (but without a beep), then returns a very large number.
(condition-case err
;; @r{Protected form.}
(/ dividend divisor)
@end group
@group
;; @r{The handler.}
(arith-error ; @r{Condition.}
;; @r{Display the usual message for this error.}
......
......@@ -171,8 +171,9 @@ If @var{option} is void, @code{defcustom} initializes it to
@var{default}. @var{default} should be an expression to compute the
value; be careful in writing it, because it can be evaluated on more
than one occasion.
@end defmac
The following additional keywords are accepted:
@code{defcustom} accepts the following additional keywords:
@table @code
@item :type @var{type}
......@@ -248,7 +249,6 @@ already set or has been customized; otherwise, just use
@code{set-default}.
@end table
@end table
@end defmac
The @code{:require} option is useful for an option that turns on the
operation of a certain feature. Assuming that the package is coded to
......
......@@ -553,6 +553,7 @@ The arguments of special forms are elided.
----------- Buffer: backtrace-output ------------
backtrace()
(list ...computing arguments...)
@end group
(progn ...)
eval((progn (1+ var) (list (quote testing) (backtrace))))
(setq ...)
......@@ -561,6 +562,7 @@ The arguments of special forms are elided.
(with-output-to-temp-buffer ...)
eval-region(1973 2142 #<buffer *scratch*>)
byte-code("... for eval-print-last-sexp ...")
@group
eval-print-last-sexp(nil)
* call-interactively(eval-print-last-sexp)
----------- Buffer: backtrace-output ------------
......
......@@ -1302,6 +1302,7 @@ This function stores @var{string} into the first cut buffer (cut buffer
like the way successive kills in Emacs move down the kill ring.
@end defun
@need 1500
@node Font Names
@section Looking up Font Names
......
......@@ -768,6 +768,7 @@ is not supplied, then the number 19 is used by default.
@result{} 14
@end example
@need 1500
More generally,
@example
......
......@@ -496,7 +496,17 @@ result list. If the final element is not a list, the result is a
``dotted list'' since its final @sc{cdr} is not @code{nil} as required
in a true list.
Here is an example of using @code{append}:
The @code{append} function also allows integers as arguments. It
converts them to strings of digits, making up the decimal print
representation of the integer, and then uses the strings instead of the
original integers. @strong{Don't use this feature; we plan to eliminate
it. If you already use this feature, change your programs now!} The
proper way to convert an integer to a decimal number in this way is with
@code{format} (@pxref{Formatting Strings}) or @code{number-to-string}
(@pxref{String Conversion}).
@end defun
Here is an example of using @code{append}:
@example
@group
......@@ -518,7 +528,7 @@ more-trees
@end group
@end example
You can see how @code{append} works by looking at a box diagram. The
You can see how @code{append} works by looking at a box diagram. The
variable @code{trees} is set to the list @code{(pine oak)} and then the
variable @code{more-trees} is set to the list @code{(maple birch pine
oak)}. However, the variable @code{trees} continues to refer to the
......@@ -537,9 +547,9 @@ more-trees trees
@end group
@end smallexample
An empty sequence contributes nothing to the value returned by
An empty sequence contributes nothing to the value returned by
@code{append}. As a consequence of this, a final @code{nil} argument
forces a copy of the previous argument.
forces a copy of the previous argument:
@example
@group
......@@ -564,7 +574,7 @@ wood
This once was the usual way to copy a list, before the function
@code{copy-sequence} was invented. @xref{Sequences Arrays Vectors}.
Here we show the use of vectors and strings as arguments to @code{append}:
Here we show the use of vectors and strings as arguments to @code{append}:
@example
@group
......@@ -573,7 +583,7 @@ Here we show the use of vectors and strings as arguments to @code{append}:
@end group
@end example
With the help of @code{apply} (@pxref{Calling Functions}), we can append
With the help of @code{apply} (@pxref{Calling Functions}), we can append
all the lists in a list of lists:
@example
......@@ -583,7 +593,7 @@ all the lists in a list of lists:
@end group
@end example
If no @var{sequences} are given, @code{nil} is returned:
If no @var{sequences} are given, @code{nil} is returned:
@example
@group
......@@ -592,7 +602,7 @@ If no @var{sequences} are given, @code{nil} is returned:
@end group
@end example
Here are some examples where the final argument is not a list:
Here are some examples where the final argument is not a list:
@example
(append '(x y) 'z)
......@@ -607,16 +617,6 @@ not a list, the sequence's elements do not become elements of the
resulting list. Instead, the sequence becomes the final @sc{cdr}, like
any other non-list final argument.
The @code{append} function also allows integers as arguments. It
converts them to strings of digits, making up the decimal print
representation of the integer, and then uses the strings instead of the
original integers. @strong{Don't use this feature; we plan to eliminate
it. If you already use this feature, change your programs now!} The
proper way to convert an integer to a decimal number in this way is with
@code{format} (@pxref{Formatting Strings}) or @code{number-to-string}
(@pxref{String Conversion}).
@end defun
@defun reverse list
This function creates a new list whose elements are the elements of
@var{list}, but in reverse order. The original argument @var{list} is
......
......@@ -1916,51 +1916,42 @@ Thus, the default value of @code{font-lock-comment-face} is
@table @code
@item font-lock-comment-face
@vindex font-lock-comment-face
@kindex font-lock-comment-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for comments.
@item font-lock-string-face
@vindex font-lock-string-face
@kindex font-lock-string-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for string constants.
@item font-lock-keyword-face
@vindex font-lock-keyword-face
@kindex font-lock-keyword-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for keywords---names that have special syntactic
significance, like @code{for} and @code{if} in C.
@item font-lock-builtin-face
@vindex font-lock-builtin-face
@kindex font-lock-builtin-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for built-in function names.
@item font-lock-function-name-face
@vindex font-lock-function-name-face
@kindex font-lock-function-name-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for the name of a function being defined or declared,
in a function definition or declaration.
@item font-lock-variable-name-face
@vindex font-lock-variable-name-face
@kindex font-lock-variable-name-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for the name of a variable being defined or declared,
in a variable definition or declaration.
@item font-lock-type-face
@vindex font-lock-type-face
@kindex font-lock-type-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for names of user-defined data types,
where they are defined and where they are used.
@item font-lock-constant-face
@vindex font-lock-constant-face
@kindex font-lock-constant-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for constant names.
@item font-lock-warning-face
@vindex font-lock-warning-face
@kindex font-lock-warning-face @r{(face name)}
Used (typically) for constructs that are peculiar, or that greatly
change the meaning of other text. For example, this is used for
@samp{;;;###autoload} cookies in Emacs Lisp, and for @code{#error}
......
......@@ -1473,7 +1473,6 @@ a list and @code{symbolp} to check for a symbol.
((listp x)
;; If X is a list, add its elements to LIST.
(setq list (append x list)))
@need 3000
(t
;; We handle only symbols and lists.
(error "Invalid argument %s in add-on" x))))
......
......@@ -638,7 +638,6 @@ This function returns the name of the machine you are running on.
@end example
@end defun
@vindex system-name
The symbol @code{system-name} is a variable as well as a function. In
fact, the function returns whatever value the variable
@code{system-name} currently holds. Thus, you can set the variable
......
......@@ -752,15 +752,16 @@ The value returned by @code{save-excursion} is the result of the last of
@example
@group
(save-excursion
@var{forms})
(save-excursion @var{forms})
@equiv{}
(let ((old-buf (current-buffer))
(old-pnt (point-marker))
@end group
(old-mark (copy-marker (mark-marker))))
(unwind-protect
(progn @var{forms})
(set-buffer old-buf)
@group
(goto-char old-pnt)
(set-marker (mark-marker) old-mark)))
@end group
......
......@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ and @samp{o} to get the regular expression @samp{fo}, which matches only
the string @samp{fo}. Still trivial. To do something more powerful, you
need to use one of the special characters. Here is a list of them:
@need 1200
@need 800
@table @asis
@item @samp{.}@: @r{(Period)}
@cindex @samp{.} in regexp
......@@ -312,7 +312,6 @@ mentioned as one of the characters not to match. This is in contrast to
the handling of regexps in programs such as @code{grep}.
@item @samp{^}
@cindex @samp{^} in regexp
@cindex beginning of line in regexp
is a special character that matches the empty string, but only at the
beginning of a line in the text being matched. Otherwise it fails to
......
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