Commit 7fd1911a authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

entered into RCS

parent ab63960f
......@@ -533,8 +533,8 @@ deciphered as follows:
@table @code
@item [.?!]
The first part of the pattern consists of three characters, a period, a
question mark and an exclamation mark, within square brackets. The
The first part of the pattern is a character set that matches any one of
three characters: period, question mark, and exclamation mark. The
match must begin with one of these three characters.
@item []\"')@}]*
......@@ -545,11 +545,11 @@ a string. The @samp{*} at the end indicates that the immediately
preceding regular expression (a character set, in this case) may be
repeated zero or more times.
@item \\($\\|@ \\|\t\\|@ @ \\)
@item \\($\\|@ $\\|\t\\|@ @ \\)
The third part of the pattern matches the whitespace that follows the
end of a sentence: the end of a line, or a tab, or two spaces. The
double backslashes mark the parentheses and vertical bars as regular
expression syntax; the parentheses mark the group and the vertical bars
expression syntax; the parentheses delimit a group and the vertical bars
separate alternatives. The dollar sign is used to match the end of a
line.
......@@ -624,14 +624,14 @@ This function searches backward in the current buffer for a string of
text that is matched by the regular expression @var{regexp}, leaving
point at the beginning of the first text found.
This function is analogous to @code{re-search-forward}, but they are
not simple mirror images. @code{re-search-forward} finds the match
whose beginning is as close as possible. If @code{re-search-backward}
were a perfect mirror image, it would find the match whose end is as
close as possible. However, in fact it finds the match whose beginning
is as close as possible. The reason is that matching a regular
expression at a given spot always works from beginning to end, and is
done at a specified beginning position.
This function is analogous to @code{re-search-forward}, but they are not
simple mirror images. @code{re-search-forward} finds the match whose
beginning is as close as possible to the starting point. If
@code{re-search-backward} were a perfect mirror image, it would find the
match whose end is as close as possible. However, in fact it finds the
match whose beginning is as close as possible. The reason is that
matching a regular expression at a given spot always works from
beginning to end, and starts at a specified beginning position.
A true mirror-image of @code{re-search-forward} would require a special
feature for matching regexps from end to beginning. It's not worth the
......@@ -804,8 +804,8 @@ number of occurrences to consider. In this case, @code{perform-replace}
returns after considering that many occurrences.
Normally, the keymap @code{query-replace-map} defines the possible user
responses. The argument @var{map}, if non-@code{nil}, is a keymap to
use instead of @code{query-replace-map}.
responses for queries. The argument @var{map}, if non-@code{nil}, is a
keymap to use instead of @code{query-replace-map}.
@end defun
@defvar query-replace-map
......@@ -837,10 +837,12 @@ Do take the action being considered---in other words, ``yes.''
Do not take action for this question---in other words, ``no.''
@item exit
Answer this question ``no,'' and don't ask any more.
Answer this question ``no,'' and give up on the entire series of
questions, assuming that the answers will be ``no.''
@item act-and-exit
Answer this question ``yes,'' and don't ask any more.
Answer this question ``yes,'' and give up on the entire series of
questions, assuming that subsequent answers will be ``no.''
@item act-and-show
Answer this question ``yes,'' but show the results---don't advance yet
......@@ -908,19 +910,18 @@ expression.
This function returns the position of the start of text matched by the
last regular expression searched for, or a subexpression of it.
The argument @var{count}, a number, specifies a subexpression whose
start position is the value. If @var{count} is zero, then the value is
the position of the text matched by the whole regexp. If @var{count} is
greater than zero, then the value is the position of the beginning of
the text matched by the @var{count}th subexpression.
If @var{count} is zero, then the value is the position of the start of
the text matched by the whole regexp. Otherwise, @var{count}, specifies
a subexpression in the regular expresion. The value of the function is
the starting position of the match for that subexpression.
Subexpressions of a regular expression are those expressions grouped
inside of parentheses, @samp{\(@dots{}\)}. The @var{count}th
with escaped parentheses, @samp{\(@dots{}\)}. The @var{count}th
subexpression is found by counting occurrences of @samp{\(} from the
beginning of the whole regular expression. The first subexpression is
numbered 1, the second 2, and so on.
The value is @code{nil} for a parenthetical grouping inside of a
The value is @code{nil} for a subexpression inside a
@samp{\|} alternative that wasn't used in the match.
@end defun
......@@ -972,7 +973,7 @@ subexpression is at the 13th character (@samp{c}).
(re-search-forward "The \\(cat \\)")
(match-beginning 0)
(match-beginning 1))
@result{} (t 9 13)
@result{} (9 9 13)
@end group
@group
......@@ -1011,6 +1012,9 @@ If the original text contains just one word, and that word is a capital
letter, @code{replace-match} considers this a capitalized first word
rather than all upper case.
If @code{case-replace} is @code{nil}, then case conversion is not done,
regardless of the value of @var{fixed-case}. @xref{Searching and Case}.
If @var{literal} is non-@code{nil}, then @var{replacement} is inserted
exactly as it is, the only alterations being case changes as needed.
If it is @code{nil} (the default), then the character @samp{\} is treated
......@@ -1024,9 +1028,9 @@ part of one of the following sequences:
@item @samp{\@var{n}}
@cindex @samp{\@var{n}} in replacement
@samp{\@var{n}} stands for the text that matched the @var{n}th
subexpression in the original regexp. Subexpressions are those
expressions grouped inside of @samp{\(@dots{}\)}. @var{n} is a digit.
@samp{\@var{n}}, where @var{n} is a digit, stands for the text that
matched the @var{n}th subexpression in the original regexp.
Subexpressions are those expressions grouped inside @samp{\(@dots{}\)}.
@item @samp{\\}
@cindex @samp{\} in replacement
......@@ -1182,8 +1186,8 @@ particular character sets, are included: thus, @samp{[aB]} would match
If you do not want this feature, set the variable
@code{case-fold-search} to @code{nil}. Then all letters must match
exactly, including case. This is a per-buffer-local variable; altering
the variable affects only the current buffer. (@xref{Intro to
exactly, including case. This is a buffer-local variable; altering the
variable affects only the current buffer. (@xref{Intro to
Buffer-Local}.) Alternatively, you may change the value of
@code{default-case-fold-search}, which is the default value of
@code{case-fold-search} for buffers that do not override it.
......@@ -1195,9 +1199,13 @@ for an upper case letter only. But this has nothing to do with the
searching functions Lisp functions use.
@defopt case-replace
This variable determines whether @code{query-replace} should preserve
case in replacements. If the variable is @code{nil}, then
@code{replace-match} should not try to convert case.
This variable determines whether the replacement functions should
preserve case. If the variable is @code{nil}, that means to use the
replacement text verbatim. A non-@code{nil} value means to convert the
case of the replacement text according to the text being replaced.
The function @code{replace-match} is where this variable actually has
its effect. @xref{Replacing Match}.
@end defopt
@defopt case-fold-search
......@@ -1222,21 +1230,22 @@ used for certain purposes in editing:
@defvar page-delimiter
This is the regexp describing line-beginnings that separate pages. The
default value is @code{"^\014"} (i.e., @code{"^^L"} or @code{"^\C-l"}).
default value is @code{"^\014"} (i.e., @code{"^^L"} or @code{"^\C-l"});
this matches a line that starts with a formfeed character.
@end defvar
@defvar paragraph-separate
This is the regular expression for recognizing the beginning of a line
that separates paragraphs. (If you change this, you may have to
change @code{paragraph-start} also.) The default value is @code{"^[
\t\f]*$"}, which is a line that consists entirely of spaces, tabs, and
form feeds.
change @code{paragraph-start} also.) The default value is
@w{@code{"^[@ \t\f]*$"}}, which matches a line that consists entirely of
spaces, tabs, and form feeds.
@end defvar
@defvar paragraph-start
This is the regular expression for recognizing the beginning of a line
that starts @emph{or} separates paragraphs. The default value is
@code{"^[ \t\n\f]"}, which matches a line starting with a space, tab,
@w{@code{"^[@ \t\n\f]"}}, which matches a line starting with a space, tab,
newline, or form feed.
@end defvar
......@@ -1246,11 +1255,12 @@ paragraph boundaries also end sentences, regardless.) The default value
is:
@example
"[.?!][]\"')@}]*\\($\\|\t\\| \\)[ \t\n]*"
"[.?!][]\"')@}]*\\($\\| $\\|\t\\| \\)[ \t\n]*"
@end example
This means a period, question mark or exclamation mark, followed by a
closing brace, followed by tabs, spaces or new lines.
This means a period, question mark or exclamation mark, followed
optionally by a closing parenthetical character, followed by tabs,
spaces or new lines.
For a detailed explanation of this regular expression, see @ref{Regexp
Example}.
......
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ mode, the character @samp{;} begins a comment, but in C mode, it
terminates a statement. To support these variations, Emacs makes the
choice of syntax table local to each buffer. Typically, each major
mode has its own syntax table and installs that table in each buffer
which uses that mode. Changing this table alters the syntax in all
that uses that mode. Changing this table alters the syntax in all
those buffers as well as in any buffers subsequently put in that mode.
Occasionally several similar modes share one syntax table.
@xref{Example Major Modes}, for an example of how to set up a syntax
......@@ -92,14 +92,14 @@ puts each character into one class. There is no necessary relationship
between the class of a character in one syntax table and its class in
any other table.
Each class is designated by a mnemonic character which serves as the
Each class is designated by a mnemonic character, which serves as the
name of the class when you need to specify a class. Usually the
designator character is one which is frequently put in that class;
however, its meaning as a designator is unvarying and independent of
what syntax that character currently has.
designator character is one that is frequently in that class; however,
its meaning as a designator is unvarying and independent of what syntax
that character currently has.
@cindex syntax descriptor
A syntax descriptor is a Lisp string which specifies a syntax class, a
A syntax descriptor is a Lisp string that specifies a syntax class, a
matching character (used only for the parenthesis classes) and flags.
The first character is the designator for a syntax class. The second
character is the character to match; if it is unused, put a space there.
......@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ comment-starter, second character of a comment-ender).
@node Syntax Class Table
@subsection Table of Syntax Classes
Here is a table syntax classes, the characters that stand for them,
Here is a table of syntax classes, the characters that stand for them,
their meanings, and examples of their use.
@deffn {Syntax class} @w{whitespace character}
......@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ newline and formfeed are almost always classified as whitespace.
@deffn {Syntax class} @w{word constituent}
@dfn{Word constituents} (designated with @samp{w}) are parts of normal
English words and are typically used in variable and command names in
programs. All upper and lower case letters and the digits are typically
programs. All upper- and lower-case letters, and the digits, are typically
word constituents.
@end deffn
......@@ -227,8 +227,8 @@ This class is not currently used in any standard Emacs modes.
@dfn{Paired delimiter characters} (designated with @samp{$}) are like
string quote characters except that the syntactic properties of the
characters between the delimiters are not suppressed. Only @TeX{} mode
uses a paired identical delimiter presently---the @samp{$} that both
enters and leaves math mode.
uses a paired delimiter presently---the @samp{$} that both enters and
leaves math mode.
@end deffn
@deffn {Syntax class} @w{expression prefix}
......@@ -278,14 +278,14 @@ The flags for a character @var{c} are:
@itemize @bullet
@item
@samp{1} means @var{c} is the start of a two-character comment start
@samp{1} means @var{c} is the start of a two-character comment-start
sequence.
@item
@samp{2} means @var{c} is the second character of such a sequence.
@item
@samp{3} means @var{c} is the start of a two-character comment end
@samp{3} means @var{c} is the start of a two-character comment-end
sequence.
@item
......@@ -305,7 +305,7 @@ comment-end sequence of style ``b''.
The two comment-start sequences must begin with the same character; only
the second character may differ. Mark the second character of the
``b''-style comment start sequence with the @samp{b} flag.
``b''-style comment-start sequence with the @samp{b} flag.
A comment-end sequence (one or two characters) applies to the ``b''
style if its first character has the @samp{b} flag set; otherwise, it
......@@ -322,10 +322,25 @@ The appropriate comment syntax settings for C++ are as follows:
@samp{>b}
@end table
Thus @samp{/*} is a comment-start sequence for ``a'' style, @samp{//}
is a comment-start sequence for ``b'' style, @samp{*/} is a
comment-end sequence for ``a'' style, and newline is a comment-end
sequence for ``b'' style.
This defines four comment-delimiting sequences:
@table @asis
@item @samp{/*}
This is a comment-start sequence for ``a'' style because the
second character, @samp{*}, does not have the @samp{b} flag.
@item @samp{//}
This is a comment-start sequence for ``b'' style because the second
character, @samp{/}, does have the @samp{b} flag.
@item @samp{*/}
This is a comment-end sequence for ``a'' style because the first
character, @samp{*}, does not have the @samp{b} flag
@item newline
This is a comment-end sequence for ``b'' style, because the newline
character has the @samp{b} flag.
@end table
@item
@c Emacs 19 feature
......@@ -347,7 +362,7 @@ altering syntax tables.
@defun make-syntax-table
This function creates a new syntax table. Character codes 0 through
31, and 128 through 255, are set up to inherit from the standard syntax
31 and 128 through 255 are set up to inherit from the standard syntax
table. The other character codes are set up by copying what the
standard syntax table says about them.
......@@ -405,7 +420,7 @@ signaled if @var{char} is not a character.
;; @r{the first character of a start-comment sequence,}
;; @r{and the second character of an end-comment sequence.}
;; @r{This is used in C mode.}
(modify-syntax-entry ?/ ".13")
(modify-syntax-entry ?/ ". 14")
@result{} nil
@end group
@end example
......@@ -421,8 +436,8 @@ An error is signaled if @var{char} is not a character.
The following examples apply to C mode. The first example shows that
the syntax class of space is whitespace (represented by a space). The
second example shows that the syntax of @samp{/} is punctuation. This
does not show the fact that it is also part of comment start and end
sequence. The third example shows that open parenthesis is in the class
does not show the fact that it is also part of comment-start and -end
sequences. The third example shows that open parenthesis is in the class
of open parentheses. This does not show the fact that it has a matching
character, @samp{)}.
......@@ -464,7 +479,7 @@ version 18 or earlier.
@defun skip-syntax-forward syntaxes &optional limit
This function moves point forward across characters having syntax classes
mentioned in @var{syntaxes}. It stops when it encounters the end of
the buffer, or position @var{lim} (if specified), or a character it is
the buffer, or position @var{limit} (if specified), or a character it is
not supposed to skip.
@ignore @c may want to change this.
The return value is the distance traveled, which is a nonnegative
......@@ -475,7 +490,7 @@ integer.
@defun skip-syntax-backward syntaxes &optional limit
This function moves point backward across characters whose syntax
classes are mentioned in @var{syntaxes}. It stops when it encounters
the beginning of the buffer, or position @var{lim} (if specified), or a
the beginning of the buffer, or position @var{limit} (if specified), or a
character it is not supposed to skip.
@ignore @c may want to change this.
The return value indicates the distance traveled. It is an integer that
......@@ -501,10 +516,10 @@ higher-level functions for moving over balanced expressions.
@defun parse-partial-sexp start limit &optional target-depth stop-before state stop-comment
This function parses a sexp in the current buffer starting at
@var{start}, not scanning past @var{limit}. It stops at @var{limit} or
when certain criteria described below are met, and sets to the location
where parsing stops. It returns a value describing the status of the
parse at the point where it stops.
@var{start}, not scanning past @var{limit}. It stops at position
@var{limit} or when certain criteria described below are met, and sets
point to the location where parsing stops. It returns a value
describing the status of the parse at the point where it stops.
If @var{state} is @code{nil}, @var{start} is assumed to be at the top
level of parenthesis structure, such as the beginning of a function
......@@ -537,8 +552,8 @@ The depth in parentheses, counting from 0.
@item
@cindex innermost containing parentheses
The character position of the start of the innermost containing
parenthetical grouping; @code{nil} if none.
The character position of the start of the innermost parenthetical
grouping containing the stopping point; @code{nil} if none.
@item
@cindex previous complete subexpression
......@@ -552,7 +567,7 @@ character that will terminate the string.
@item
@cindex inside comment
@code{t} if inside a comment.
@code{t} if inside a comment (of either style).
@item
@cindex quote character
......@@ -581,14 +596,15 @@ If @var{depth} is nonzero, parenthesis depth counting begins from that
value. The only candidates for stopping are places where the depth in
parentheses becomes zero; @code{scan-lists} counts @var{count} such
places and then stops. Thus, a positive value for @var{depth} means go
out levels of parenthesis.
out @var{depth} levels of parenthesis.
Scanning ignores comments if @code{parse-sexp-ignore-comments} is
non-@code{nil}.
If scan reaches the beginning or end of the buffer (or its accessible
portion), and the depth is not zero, an error is signaled. If the depth
is zero but the count is not used up, @code{nil} is returned.
If the scan reaches the beginning or end of the buffer (or its
accessible portion), and the depth is not zero, an error is signaled.
If the depth is zero but the count is not used up, @code{nil} is
returned.
@end defun
@defun scan-sexps from count
......@@ -598,7 +614,7 @@ This function scans forward @var{count} sexps from character position
Scanning ignores comments if @code{parse-sexp-ignore-comments} is
non-@code{nil}.
If scan reaches the beginning or end of (the accessible part of) the
If the scan reaches the beginning or end of (the accessible part of) the
buffer in the middle of a parenthetical grouping, an error is signaled.
If it reaches the beginning or end between groupings but before count is
used up, @code{nil} is returned.
......@@ -628,7 +644,7 @@ It also stops after satisfying @var{count}.
To move forward over all comments and whitespace following point, use
@code{(forward-comment (buffer-size))}. @code{(buffer-size)} is a good
argument to use, because the number of comments to in the buffer cannot
argument to use, because the number of comments in the buffer cannot
exceed that many.
@node Standard Syntax Tables
......
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