Commit 827b7ee7 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Put period and comma inside quotes.

parent 13cad738
......@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ in a while, to keep Emacs Lisp programmers on their toes.
@item
The @code{min-colors} face attribute, used for tailoring faces to
limited-color displays, does not exist. If in doubt, use colors like
``white'' and ``black'', which ought to be defined everywhere.
``white'' and ``black,'' which ought to be defined everywhere.
@item
The @code{tty-color-mode} frame parameter does not exist. You should
......@@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ the sentinel.
@item
Many programming shortcuts have been deleted, to provide you with the
enjoyment of ``rolling your own''. The macros @code{while-no-input},
enjoyment of ``rolling your own.'' The macros @code{while-no-input},
@code{with-local-quit}, and @code{with-selected-window}, along with
@code{dynamic-completion-table} and @code{lazy-completion-table} no
longer exist. Also, there are no built-in progress reporters;
......
......@@ -484,7 +484,7 @@ correspond to the new file name, unless the new name is already in
use.
If @var{filename} is @code{nil} or the empty string, that stands for
``no visited file''. In this case, @code{set-visited-file-name} marks
``no visited file.'' In this case, @code{set-visited-file-name} marks
the buffer as having no visited file, without changing the buffer's
modified flag.
......
......@@ -2165,7 +2165,7 @@ same symbol that would normally represent that combination of mouse
button and modifier keys. The information about the window part is kept
elsewhere in the event---in the coordinates. But
@code{read-key-sequence} translates this information into imaginary
``prefix keys'', all of which are symbols: @code{header-line},
``prefix keys,'' all of which are symbols: @code{header-line},
@code{horizontal-scroll-bar}, @code{menu-bar}, @code{mode-line},
@code{vertical-line}, and @code{vertical-scroll-bar}. You can define
meanings for mouse clicks in special window parts by defining key
......@@ -2410,7 +2410,7 @@ individual events, which you can put in @code{unread-command-events}.
@defvar unread-command-char
This variable holds a character to be read as command input.
A value of -1 means ``empty''.
A value of -1 means ``empty.''
This variable is mostly obsolete now that you can use
@code{unread-command-events} instead; it exists only to support programs
......@@ -2898,7 +2898,7 @@ using the minibuffer. Usually it is more convenient for the user if you
change the major mode of the current buffer temporarily to a special
major mode, which should have a command to go back to the previous mode.
(The @kbd{e} command in Rmail uses this technique.) Or, if you wish to
give the user different text to edit ``recursively'', create and select
give the user different text to edit ``recursively,'' create and select
a new buffer in a special mode. In this mode, define a command to
complete the processing and go back to the previous buffer. (The
@kbd{m} command in Rmail does this.)
......
......@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ non-@code{nil}, the clause ``succeeds''; then @code{cond} evaluates its
@var{body-forms}, and the value of the last of @var{body-forms} becomes
the value of the @code{cond}. The remaining clauses are ignored.
If the value of @var{condition} is @code{nil}, the clause ``fails'', so
If the value of @var{condition} is @code{nil}, the clause ``fails,'' so
the @code{cond} moves on to the following clause, trying its
@var{condition}.
......@@ -623,7 +623,7 @@ error is signaled with data @code{(@var{tag} @var{value})}.
@subsection Examples of @code{catch} and @code{throw}
One way to use @code{catch} and @code{throw} is to exit from a doubly
nested loop. (In most languages, this would be done with a ``go to''.)
nested loop. (In most languages, this would be done with a ``go to.'')
Here we compute @code{(foo @var{i} @var{j})} for @var{i} and @var{j}
varying from 0 to 9:
......
......@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ boundary. @xref{Filling}.
indicate truncated and continued lines (@pxref{Fringes}). On a text
terminal, a @samp{$} in the rightmost column of the window indicates
truncation; a @samp{\} on the rightmost column indicates a line that
``wraps''. (The display table can specify alternate characters to use
``wraps.'' (The display table can specify alternate characters to use
for this; @pxref{Display Tables}).
@defopt truncate-lines
......@@ -1189,7 +1189,7 @@ The return value is @var{overlay}.
This is the only valid way to change the endpoints of an overlay. Do
not try modifying the markers in the overlay by hand, as that fails to
update other vital data structures and can cause some overlays to be
``lost''.
``lost.''
@end defun
@defun remove-overlays &optional start end name value
......@@ -2013,7 +2013,7 @@ A non-@code{nil} value specifies a bold font.
A non-@code{nil} value specifies an italic font.
@end table
For compatibility, you can still set these ``attributes'', even
For compatibility, you can still set these ``attributes,'' even
though they are not real face attributes. Here is what that does:
@table @code
......@@ -3767,7 +3767,7 @@ $$\pmatrix{ 2 & -1 & 0 \cr
@end ifnottex
@item disabled
Specifies transforming the image so that it looks ``disabled''.
Specifies transforming the image so that it looks ``disabled.''
@end table
@item :mask @var{mask}
......@@ -4804,7 +4804,7 @@ Any @var{args} are passed to @var{map-function}.
@subsection Abstract Display Example
Here is a simple example using functions of the ewoc package to
implement a ``color components display'', an area in a buffer that
implement a ``color components display,'' an area in a buffer that
represents a vector of three integers (itself representing a 24-bit RGB
value) in various ways.
......@@ -5320,7 +5320,7 @@ variable.
@section Window Systems
Emacs works with several window systems, most notably the X Window
System. Both Emacs and X use the term ``window'', but use it
System. Both Emacs and X use the term ``window,'' but use it
differently. An Emacs frame is a single window as far as X is
concerned; the individual Emacs windows are not known to X at all.
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Secondarily, this License preserves for the author and publisher a way
to get credit for their work, while not being considered responsible
for modifications made by others.
This License is a kind of ``copyleft'', which means that derivative
This License is a kind of ``copyleft,'' which means that derivative
works of the document must themselves be free in the same sense. It
complements the GNU General Public License, which is a copyleft
license designed for free software.
......@@ -45,9 +45,9 @@ This License applies to any manual or other work, in any medium, that
contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it can be
distributed under the terms of this License. Such a notice grants a
world-wide, royalty-free license, unlimited in duration, to use that
work under the conditions stated herein. The ``Document'', below,
work under the conditions stated herein. The ``Document,'' below,
refers to any such manual or work. Any member of the public is a
licensee, and is addressed as ``you''. You accept the license if you
licensee, and is addressed as ``you.'' You accept the license if you
copy, modify or distribute the work in a way requiring permission
under copyright law.
......@@ -114,8 +114,8 @@ preceding the beginning of the body of the text.
A section ``Entitled XYZ'' means a named subunit of the Document whose
title either is precisely XYZ or contains XYZ in parentheses following
text that translates XYZ in another language. (Here XYZ stands for a
specific section name mentioned below, such as ``Acknowledgements'',
``Dedications'', ``Endorsements'', or ``History''.) To ``Preserve the Title''
specific section name mentioned below, such as ``Acknowledgements,''
``Dedications,'' ``Endorsements,'' or ``History.'') To ``Preserve the Title''
of such a section when you modify the Document means that it remains a
section ``Entitled XYZ'' according to this definition.
......@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ F. Include, immediately after the copyright notices, a license notice
G. Preserve in that license notice the full lists of Invariant Sections
and required Cover Texts given in the Document's license notice.@*
H. Include an unaltered copy of this License.@*
I. Preserve the section Entitled ``History'', Preserve its Title, and add
I. Preserve the section Entitled ``History,'' Preserve its Title, and add
to it an item stating at least the title, year, new authors, and
publisher of the Modified Version as given on the Title Page. If
there is no section Entitled ``History'' in the Document, create one
......@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ J. Preserve the network location, if any, given in the Document for
You may omit a network location for a work that was published at
least four years before the Document itself, or if the original
publisher of the version it refers to gives permission.@*
K. For any section Entitled ``Acknowledgements'' or ``Dedications'',
K. For any section Entitled ``Acknowledgements'' or ``Dedications,''
Preserve the Title of the section, and preserve in the section all
the substance and tone of each of the contributor acknowledgements
and/or dedications given therein.@*
......@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@ of these sections as invariant. To do this, add their titles to the
list of Invariant Sections in the Modified Version's license notice.
These titles must be distinct from any other section titles.
You may add a section Entitled ``Endorsements'', provided it contains
You may add a section Entitled ``Endorsements,'' provided it contains
nothing but endorsements of your Modified Version by various
parties--for example, statements of peer review or that the text has
been approved by an organization as the authoritative definition of a
......@@ -286,7 +286,7 @@ Invariant Sections in the license notice of the combined work.
In the combination, you must combine any sections Entitled ``History''
in the various original documents, forming one section Entitled
``History''; likewise combine any sections Entitled ``Acknowledgements'',
``History''; likewise combine any sections Entitled ``Acknowledgements,''
and any sections Entitled ``Dedications.'' You must delete all sections
Entitled ``Endorsements.''
@sp 1
......@@ -340,8 +340,8 @@ of those notices and disclaimers. In case of a disagreement between
the translation and the original version of this License or a notice
or disclaimer, the original version will prevail.
If a section in the Document is Entitled ``Acknowledgements'',
``Dedications'', or ``History'', the requirement (section 4) to Preserve
If a section in the Document is Entitled ``Acknowledgements,''
``Dedications,'' or ``History,'' the requirement (section 4) to Preserve
its Title (section 1) will typically require changing the actual
title.
@sp 1
......@@ -390,7 +390,7 @@ under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;
with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.
A copy of the license is included in the section entitled ``GNU
Free Documentation License''.
Free Documentation License.''
@end group
@end smallexample
......
......@@ -658,7 +658,7 @@ The file lock is really a file, a symbolic link with a special name,
stored in the same directory as the file you are editing.
When you access files using NFS, there may be a small probability that
you and another user will both lock the same file ``simultaneously''.
you and another user will both lock the same file ``simultaneously.''
If this happens, it is possible for the two users to make changes
simultaneously, but Emacs will still warn the user who saves second.
Also, the detection of modification of a buffer visiting a file changed
......@@ -1681,7 +1681,7 @@ return value, but backup version numbers are kept.
@end defun
@defun file-name-extension filename &optional period
This function returns @var{filename}'s final ``extension'', if any,
This function returns @var{filename}'s final ``extension,'' if any,
after applying @code{file-name-sans-versions} to remove any
version/backup part. The extension, in a file name, is the part that
starts with the last @samp{.} in the last name component (minus
......@@ -2653,7 +2653,7 @@ unlocking the buffer if it is locked.
possibly others to be added in the future. It need not implement all
these operations itself---when it has nothing special to do for a
certain operation, it can reinvoke the primitive, to handle the
operation ``in the usual way''. It should always reinvoke the primitive
operation ``in the usual way.'' It should always reinvoke the primitive
for an operation it does not recognize. Here's one way to do this:
@smallexample
......
......@@ -641,7 +641,7 @@ This variable specifies how to blink the cursor. Each element has the
form @code{(@var{on-state} . @var{off-state})}. Whenever the cursor
type equals @var{on-state} (comparing using @code{equal}), the
corresponding @var{off-state} specifies what the cursor looks like
when it blinks ``off''. Both @var{on-state} and @var{off-state}
when it blinks ``off.'' Both @var{on-state} and @var{off-state}
should be suitable values for the @code{cursor-type} frame parameter.
There are various defaults for how to blink each type of cursor, if
......@@ -967,7 +967,7 @@ internals of Emacs.
@defun visible-frame-list
This function returns a list of just the currently visible frames.
@xref{Visibility of Frames}. (Terminal frames always count as
``visible'', even though only the selected one is actually displayed.)
``visible,'' even though only the selected one is actually displayed.)
@end defun
@defun next-frame &optional frame minibuf
......@@ -1251,7 +1251,7 @@ changes. @xref{Misc Events}.
Most window systems use a desktop metaphor. Part of this metaphor is
the idea that windows are stacked in a notional third dimension
perpendicular to the screen surface, and thus ordered from ``highest''
to ``lowest''. Where two windows overlap, the one higher up covers
to ``lowest.'' Where two windows overlap, the one higher up covers
the one underneath. Even a window at the bottom of the stack can be
seen if no other window overlaps it.
......@@ -1259,7 +1259,7 @@ seen if no other window overlaps it.
@cindex lowering a frame
A window's place in this ordering is not fixed; in fact, users tend
to change the order frequently. @dfn{Raising} a window means moving
it ``up'', to the top of the stack. @dfn{Lowering} a window means
it ``up,'' to the top of the stack. @dfn{Lowering} a window means
moving it to the bottom of the stack. This motion is in the notional
third dimension only, and does not change the position of the window
on the screen.
......@@ -1519,7 +1519,7 @@ the menu keymap as necessary.
A dialog box is a variant of a pop-up menu---it looks a little
different, it always appears in the center of a frame, and it has just
one level and one or more buttons. The main use of dialog boxes is
for asking questions that the user can answer with ``yes'', ``no'',
for asking questions that the user can answer with ``yes,'' ``no,''
and a few other alternatives. With a single button, they can also
force the user to acknowledge important information. The functions
@code{y-or-n-p} and @code{yes-or-no-p} use dialog boxes instead of the
......@@ -1780,7 +1780,7 @@ colors.)
These functions provide a way to determine which color names are
valid, and what they look like. In some cases, the value depends on the
@dfn{selected frame}, as described below; see @ref{Input Focus}, for the
meaning of the term ``selected frame''.
meaning of the term ``selected frame.''
@defun color-defined-p color &optional frame
This function reports whether a color name is meaningful. It returns
......@@ -2150,7 +2150,7 @@ software (as a string). Really this means whoever distributes the X
server.
When the developers of X labelled software distributors as
``vendors'', they showed their false assumption that no system could
``vendors,'' they showed their false assumption that no system could
ever be developed and distributed noncommercially.
@end defun
......
......@@ -485,7 +485,7 @@ more convenient than making the function definition point to itself
practice).
We often identify functions with the symbols used to name them. For
example, we often speak of ``the function @code{car}'', not
example, we often speak of ``the function @code{car},'' not
distinguishing between the symbol @code{car} and the primitive
subr-object that is its function definition. For most purposes, the
distinction is not important.
......@@ -846,7 +846,7 @@ bool-vector, or a string.
In Lisp, a function is a list that starts with @code{lambda}, a
byte-code function compiled from such a list, or alternatively a
primitive subr-object; names are ``extra''. Although usually functions
primitive subr-object; names are ``extra.'' Although usually functions
are defined with @code{defun} and given names at the same time, it is
occasionally more concise to use an explicit lambda expression---an
anonymous function. Such a list is valid wherever a function name is.
......
......@@ -75,13 +75,13 @@ modification follow.
@item
This License applies to any program or other work which contains
a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it may be distributed
under the terms of this General Public License. The ``Program'', below,
under the terms of this General Public License. The ``Program,'' below,
refers to any such program or work, and a ``work based on the Program''
means either the Program or any derivative work under copyright law:
that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it,
either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another
language. (Hereinafter, translation is included without limitation in
the term ``modification''.) Each licensee is addressed as ``you''.
the term ``modification.'') Each licensee is addressed as ``you.''
Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not
covered by this License; they are outside its scope. The act of
......@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@ address new problems or concerns.
Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program
specifies a version number of this License which applies to it and ``any
later version'', you have the option of following the terms and conditions
later version,'' you have the option of following the terms and conditions
either of that version or of any later version published by the Free
Software Foundation. If the Program does not specify a version number of
this License, you may choose any version ever published by the Free Software
......
......@@ -79,13 +79,13 @@ alternatives:
Keys which are numbers are ``the same'' if they are @code{equal}, that
is, if they are equal in value and either both are integers or both
are floating point numbers; otherwise, two distinct objects are never
``the same''.
``the same.''
@item eq
Any two distinct Lisp objects are ``different'' as keys.
@item equal
Two Lisp objects are ``the same'', as keys, if they are equal
Two Lisp objects are ``the same,'' as keys, if they are equal
according to @code{equal}.
@end table
......
......@@ -1270,7 +1270,7 @@ Non-@code{nil} means current value of @code{start} was the beginning of a line
when it was chosen.
@item too_small_ok
Non-@code{nil} means don't delete this window for becoming ``too small''.
Non-@code{nil} means don't delete this window for becoming ``too small.''
@item height_fixed_p
This field is temporarily set to 1 to fix the height of the selected
......
......@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ printer'' refer to those routines in Lisp that convert textual
representations of Lisp objects into actual Lisp objects, and vice
versa. @xref{Printed Representation}, for more details. You, the
person reading this manual, are thought of as ``the programmer'' and are
addressed as ``you''. ``The user'' is the person who uses Lisp
addressed as ``you.'' ``The user'' is the person who uses Lisp
programs, including those you write.
@cindex fonts in this manual
......@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ the examples in this manual, this is indicated with @samp{@result{}}:
@end example
@noindent
You can read this as ``@code{(car '(1 2))} evaluates to 1''.
You can read this as ``@code{(car '(1 2))} evaluates to 1.''
When a form is a macro call, it expands into a new form for Lisp to
evaluate. We show the result of the expansion with
......
......@@ -2232,7 +2232,7 @@ Next we define the menu items:
Note the symbols which the bindings are ``made for''; these appear
inside square brackets, in the key sequence being defined. In some
cases, this symbol is the same as the command name; sometimes it is
different. These symbols are treated as ``function keys'', but they are
different. These symbols are treated as ``function keys,'' but they are
not real function keys on the keyboard. They do not affect the
functioning of the menu itself, but they are ``echoed'' in the echo area
when the user selects from the menu, and they appear in the output of
......
......@@ -1503,7 +1503,7 @@ a @sc{cdr} @code{equal} to @var{value}.
@code{rassoc} is like @code{assoc} except that it compares the @sc{cdr} of
each @var{alist} association instead of the @sc{car}. You can think of
this as ``reverse @code{assoc}'', finding the key for a given value.
this as ``reverse @code{assoc},'' finding the key for a given value.
@end defun
@defun assq key alist
......@@ -1544,7 +1544,7 @@ a @sc{cdr} @code{eq} to @var{value}.
@code{rassq} is like @code{assq} except that it compares the @sc{cdr} of
each @var{alist} association instead of the @sc{car}. You can think of
this as ``reverse @code{assq}'', finding the key for a given value.
this as ``reverse @code{assq},'' finding the key for a given value.
For example:
......
......@@ -1509,7 +1509,7 @@ the call.
This function asks the user a question, expecting input in the echo
area. It returns @code{t} if the user types @kbd{y}, @code{nil} if the
user types @kbd{n}. This function also accepts @key{SPC} to mean yes
and @key{DEL} to mean no. It accepts @kbd{C-]} to mean ``quit'', like
and @key{DEL} to mean no. It accepts @kbd{C-]} to mean ``quit,'' like
@kbd{C-g}, because the question might look like a minibuffer and for
that reason the user might try to use @kbd{C-]} to get out. The answer
is a single character, with no @key{RET} needed to terminate it. Upper
......@@ -1699,7 +1699,7 @@ answer); @var{function} is a function of one argument (an object from
When the user responds with @var{char}, @code{map-y-or-n-p} calls
@var{function}. If it returns non-@code{nil}, the object is considered
``acted upon'', and @code{map-y-or-n-p} advances to the next object in
``acted upon,'' and @code{map-y-or-n-p} advances to the next object in
@var{list}. If it returns @code{nil}, the prompt is repeated for the
same object.
......
......@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ If @var{function} is already present in @var{hook} (comparing using
It is best to design your hook functions so that the order in which they
are executed does not matter. Any dependence on the order is ``asking
for trouble''. However, the order is predictable: normally,
for trouble.'' However, the order is predictable: normally,
@var{function} goes at the front of the hook list, so it will be
executed first (barring another @code{add-hook} call). If the optional
argument @var{append} is non-@code{nil}, the new hook function goes at
......@@ -1139,7 +1139,7 @@ it should not use @code{after-change-major-mode-hook} as of yet.
When you defined a major mode using @code{define-derived-mode}, it
automatically makes sure these conventions are followed. If you
define a major mode ``from scratch'', not using
define a major mode ``from scratch,'' not using
@code{define-derived-mode}, make sure the major mode command follows
these and other conventions. @xref{Major Mode Conventions}. You use
these functions to do it properly.
......@@ -1456,7 +1456,7 @@ See the command \\[hungry-electric-delete]."
@end smallexample
@noindent
This defines a minor mode named ``Hungry mode'', a command named
This defines a minor mode named ``Hungry mode,'' a command named
@code{hungry-mode} to toggle it, a variable named @code{hungry-mode}
which indicates whether the mode is enabled, and a variable named
@code{hungry-mode-map} which holds the keymap that is active when the
......
......@@ -737,7 +737,7 @@ and returns that value as a floating point number.
sequence of @dfn{bits} (digits which are either zero or one). A bitwise
operation acts on the individual bits of such a sequence. For example,
@dfn{shifting} moves the whole sequence left or right one or more places,
reproducing the same pattern ``moved over''.
reproducing the same pattern ``moved over.''
The bitwise operations in Emacs Lisp apply only to integers.
......
......@@ -632,7 +632,7 @@ come to refer to any structure made out of cons cells.
@cindex atom
Because cons cells are so central to Lisp, we also have a word for
``an object which is not a cons cell''. These objects are called
``an object which is not a cons cell.'' These objects are called
@dfn{atoms}.
@cindex parenthesis
......@@ -1238,7 +1238,7 @@ without qualification, we mean a Lisp macro, not a keyboard macro.
A @dfn{primitive function} is a function callable from Lisp but
written in the C programming language. Primitive functions are also
called @dfn{subrs} or @dfn{built-in functions}. (The word ``subr'' is
derived from ``subroutine''.) Most primitive functions evaluate all
derived from ``subroutine.'') Most primitive functions evaluate all
their arguments when they are called. A primitive function that does
not evaluate all its arguments is called a @dfn{special form}
(@pxref{Special Forms}).@refill
......
......@@ -1839,7 +1839,7 @@ data transmission, but the value is used for calculations such as
padding. It also affects decisions about whether to scroll part of the
screen or repaint---even when using a window system. (We designed it
this way despite the fact that a window system has no true ``output
speed'', to give you a way to tune these decisions.)
speed,'' to give you a way to tune these decisions.)
The value is measured in baud.
@end defvar
......
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