Commit 85738751 authored by Stefan Monnier's avatar Stefan Monnier

Merge from emacs-23 branch

parents 75d1428c a6d676d9
2010-03-30 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Input Methods): Mention "C-x 8 RET" and add a
cross-reference to "Inserting Text".
* basic.texi (Inserting Text): Add an index entry for "C-x 8 RET".
Mention completion provided by `ucs-insert'.
2010-03-30 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* sending.texi (Sending Mail): Note variables that may need
customizing.
(Mail Sending): Expand discussion of send-mail-function.
2010-03-30 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
Document Message mode as the default mail mode.
* sending.texi (Sending Mail): Copyedits.
(Mail Format, Mail Headers): Document mail-from-style changes.
(Mail Commands): Rename from Mail mode. Document Message mode.
(Mail Misc): Rename from Mail mode Misc.
(Mail Sending, Header Editing, Mail Misc): Switch to Message mode
command names and update keybindings.
(Header Editing): Document message-tab. De-document
mail-self-blind, mail-default-reply-to, and mail-archive-file-name in
favor of mail-default-headers. Ad index entries for user-full-name and
user-mail-address.
(Citing Mail): Update changes in Message mode behavior. Document
mail-yank-prefix.
(Mail Signature): New node, moved from Mail Misc.
(Mail Aliases): Mail abbrevs are the default with Message mode.
(Mail Methods): Note that Message mode is now the default.
* rmail.texi (Rmail Reply):
* text.texi (Text Mode):
* major.texi (Major Modes):
* mule.texi (Output Coding): Refer to Message mode.
* custom.texi (Init Examples): Add xref to Mail Header.
* emacs.texi (Top): Fix xrefs.
2010-03-30 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* maintaining.texi (VC With A Merging VCS): C-x v v now creates a
repository if there is none.
(VC Change Log): Rename from VC Status. Document vc-log-show-limit and
vc-print-root-log.
(Old Revisions): Copyedits. Document vc-root-diff.
* programs.texi (Program Modes): Mention Javascript mode.
* text.texi (HTML Mode): Note that nXML is now the default XML mode.
* emacs.texi: Update node description.
* misc.texi (Navigation): Document doc-view-continuous.
(Shell Ring): Document new M-r binding. M-s is no longer bound.
2010-03-30 Juri Linkov <juri@jurta.org>
* search.texi (Other Repeating Search): Remove line that `occur'
......
......@@ -100,13 +100,15 @@ character code, just like digits.
character to insert (@pxref{Arguments}).
@findex ucs-insert
@kindex C-x 8 RET
@cindex Unicode
Instead of @kbd{C-q}, you can use @kbd{C-x 8 @key{RET}}
(@code{ucs-insert}) to insert a character based on its Unicode name or
code-point. This commands prompts for a character to insert, using
the minibuffer; you can specify the character using either (i) the
character's name in the Unicode standard, or (ii) the character's
code-point in the Unicode standard.
code-point in the Unicode standard. If you specify the character's
name, the command provides completion.
@node Moving Point
@section Changing the Location of Point
......
......@@ -2269,8 +2269,9 @@ Specify your own email address, if Emacs can't figure it out correctly.
(setq user-mail-address "cheney@@torture.gov")
@end example
Various Emacs packages that need your own email address use the value of
@code{user-mail-address}.
Various Emacs packages, such as Message mode, consult
@code{user-mail-address} when they need to know your email address.
@xref{Mail Headers}.
@item
Make Text mode the default mode for new buffers.
......
......@@ -574,7 +574,7 @@ Commands for Human Languages
* Text Mode:: The major modes for editing text files.
* Outline Mode:: Editing outlines.
* TeX Mode:: Editing input to the formatter TeX.
* HTML Mode:: Editing HTML, SGML, and XML files.
* HTML Mode:: Editing HTML and SGML files.
* Nroff Mode:: Editing input to the formatter nroff.
* Formatted Text:: Editing formatted text directly in WYSIWYG fashion.
* Text Based Tables:: Editing text-based tables in WYSIWYG fashion.
......@@ -796,7 +796,7 @@ Basic Editing under Version Control
The Secondary Commands of VC
* Registering:: Putting a file under version control.
* VC Status:: Viewing the VC status of files.
* VC Change Log:: Viewing the VC Change Log.
* VC Undo:: Canceling changes before or after check-in.
VC Directory Mode
......@@ -888,16 +888,17 @@ Sending Mail
* Mail Format:: Format of the mail being composed.
* Mail Headers:: Details of some standard mail header fields.
* Mail Aliases:: Abbreviating and grouping mail addresses.
* Mail Mode:: Special commands for editing mail being composed.
* Mail Commands:: Special commands for editing mail being composed.
* Mail Signature:: Adding a signature to every message.
* Mail Amusements:: Distracting the NSA; adding fortune messages.
* Mail Methods:: Using alternative mail-composition methods.
Mail Mode
Mail Commands
* Mail Sending:: Commands to send the message.
* Header Editing:: Commands to move to header fields and edit them.
* Citing Mail:: Copying all or part of a message you are replying to.
* Mail Mode Misc:: Spell checking, signatures, etc.
* Citing Mail:: Quoting a message you are replying to.
* Mail Misc:: Attachments, spell checking, etc.
Reading Mail with Rmail
......
......@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ the repository, along with a log entry for those changes.
@cindex revision
@cindex revision ID
A copy of a file stored in a repository is called a @dfn{revision}.
The history of a file is a sequence of revisions. Each revisions is
The history of a file is a sequence of revisions. Each revision is
named by a @dfn{revision ID}. The format of the revision ID depends
on the version control system; in the simplest case, it is just an
integer.
......@@ -403,10 +403,10 @@ Directory buffer, and some files in it are marked, the VC fileset
consists of the marked files (@pxref{VC Directory Mode}).
The principal VC command is an all-purpose command, @kbd{C-x v v}
(@code{vc-next-action}), that performs either locking, merging or a
check-in (depending on the situation) on the current VC fileset. You
can use @kbd{C-x v v} in a file-visiting buffer or in a VC Directory
buffer.
(@code{vc-next-action}), that performs either registration, locking,
merging or a check-in (depending on the situation) on the current VC
fileset. You can use @kbd{C-x v v} in a file-visiting buffer or in a
VC Directory buffer.
@table @kbd
@itemx C-x v v
......@@ -461,23 +461,31 @@ unmodified; it flips to @samp{:} as soon as you save any changes
@itemize @bullet
@item
If the work file is the same as in the repository, it does nothing.
If the work file is in a directory that is not controlled by any
version control system, prompt for a repository type. Then, create a
version control repository of that type and register the file with it.
@item
If the work file is in a directory that is controlled by a version
control system but not registered with it, register the file.
@item
If the work file is the same as in the repository, do nothing.
@item
If you have not changed the work file, but some other user has checked
in changes to the repository, @kbd{C-x v v} merges those changes into
the work file.
in changes to the repository, merge those changes into the work file.
@item
If you have made modifications to the work file, @kbd{C-x v v}
attempts to check in your changes. To do this, Emacs first reads the
log entry for the new revision (@pxref{Log Buffer}). If some other
user has checked in changes to the repository since you last checked
it out, the checkin fails. In that case, type @kbd{C-x v v} again to
merge those changes into your own work file; this puts the work file
into a ``conflicted'' state. Type @kbd{C-x v v} to clear the
``conflicted'' state; VC then regards the file as up-to-date and
modified, and you can try to check it in again.
If you have made modifications to the work file, attempts to check in
your changes. To do this, Emacs first reads the log entry for the new
revision (@pxref{Log Buffer}). If some other user has checked in
changes to the repository since you last checked it out, the checkin
fails. In that case, type @kbd{C-x v v} again to merge those changes
into your own work file; this puts the work file into a ``conflicted''
state. Type @kbd{C-x v v} to clear the ``conflicted'' state; VC then
regards the file as up-to-date and modified, and you can try to check
it in again.
To pick up any recent changes from the repository @emph{without}
trying to commit your own changes, type @kbd{C-x v m @key{RET}}.
......@@ -485,15 +493,15 @@ trying to commit your own changes, type @kbd{C-x v m @key{RET}}.
@end itemize
These rules also apply when you use RCS in its ``non-locking'' mode,
except that changes will not be automatically merged from the
repository. Nothing informs you if another user has checked in
changes in the same file since you began editing it; when you check in
your revision, his changes are removed (however, they remain in the
repository and are thus not irrevocably lost). Therefore, you must
verify that the current revision is unchanged before checking in your
changes. In addition, locking is possible with RCS even in this mode:
@kbd{C-x v v} with an unmodified file locks the file, just as it does
with RCS in its normal locking mode (@pxref{VC With A Locking VCS}).
except that changes are not automatically merged from the repository.
Nothing informs you if another user has checked in changes in the same
file since you began editing it; when you check in your revision, his
changes are removed (however, they remain in the repository and are
thus not irrevocably lost). Therefore, you must verify that the
current revision is unchanged before checking in your changes. In
addition, locking is possible with RCS even in this mode: @kbd{C-x v
v} with an unmodified file locks the file, just as it does with RCS in
its normal locking mode (@pxref{VC With A Locking VCS}).
@node VC With A Locking VCS
@subsubsection Basic Version Control with Locking
......@@ -501,26 +509,25 @@ with RCS in its normal locking mode (@pxref{VC With A Locking VCS}).
Under a locking-based version control system (such as SCCS, and RCS
in its default mode), @kbd{C-x v v} does the following:
@itemize @bullet
@itemize @bullet
@item
If the file is not locked, @kbd{C-x v v} locks it, and makes it
writable so that you can change it.
If the file is not locked, lock it and make it writable, so that you
can change it.
@item
If the file is locked by you, and contains changes, @kbd{C-x v v}
checks in the changes. In order to do this, it first reads the log
entry for the new revision. @xref{Log Buffer}.
If the file is locked by you, and contains changes, check in the
changes. In order to do this, Emacs first reads the log entry for the
new revision. @xref{Log Buffer}.
@item
If the file is locked by you, but you have not changed it since you
locked it, @kbd{C-x v v} releases the lock and makes the file
read-only again.
locked it, release the lock and makes the file read-only again.
@item
If the file is locked by some other user, @kbd{C-x v v} asks you whether
you want to ``steal the lock'' from that user. If you say yes, the file
becomes locked by you, but a message is sent to the person who had
formerly locked the file, to inform him of what has happened.
If the file is locked by some other user, ask whether you want to
``steal the lock'' from that user. If you say yes, the file becomes
locked by you, but a message is sent to the person who had formerly
locked the file, to inform him of what has happened.
@end itemize
These rules also apply when you use CVS in locking mode, except
......@@ -639,20 +646,23 @@ and @code{vc-log-mode-hook}. @xref{Hooks}.
to examine any revision of a file, or compare two revisions.
@table @kbd
@item C-x v ~ @var{revision} @key{RET}
Examine revision @var{revision} of the visited file, in a buffer of its
own.
@item C-x v ~
Prompt for a revision of the current file, and visit it in a buffer of
its own (@code{vc-revision-other-window}).
@item C-x v =
Compare the buffer contents associated with the current
fileset with the working revision(s) from which you started editing.
Compare the files in the current fileset with the working revision(s)
you started from (@code{vc-diff}). With a prefix argument, prompt for
two revisions of the current fileset and compare them.
@item C-u C-x v = @key{RET} @var{oldvers} @key{RET} @var{newvers} @key{RET}
Compare the specified two repository revisions of the current fileset.
@item C-x v D
Compare the entire tree corresponding to the current fileset with the
tree you started from (@code{vc-root-diff}). With a prefix argument,
prompt for two revisions and compare their trees.
@item C-x v g
Display an annotated version of the file: for each line, show the
latest revision in which it was modified.
latest revision in which it was modified (@code{vc-annotate}).
@end table
@findex vc-revision-other-window
......@@ -673,12 +683,11 @@ buffer in a separate window.
@findex vc-diff
@kindex C-x v =
@kbd{C-x v =} (@code{vc-diff}) compares the current buffer contents
of each file in the current VC fileset (saving them if necessary) with
the repository revision from which you started editing. Note that the
latter may or may not be the latest revision of the file(s). The diff
is displayed in a special buffer in another window. @xref{Comparing
Files}.
@kbd{C-x v =} (@code{vc-diff}) compares each file in the current VC
fileset (saving them if necessary) with the repository revision(s)
from which you started editing. Note that the latter may or may not
be the latest revision of the file(s). The diff is displayed in a
special buffer in another window. @xref{Comparing Files}.
@findex vc-diff
@kindex C-u C-x v =
......@@ -700,6 +709,12 @@ revision ID for a multi-file fileset (as opposed to a symbolic tag
name) is unlikely to return diffs that are connected in any meaningful
way.
The command @kbd{C-x v D} (@code{vc-root-diff}) is similar to
@kbd{C-x v =}, but it compares the entire tree associated with the
current VC fileset with the tree you started with. This means all the
files controlled by the current version control repository, even those
that are not part of the current VC fileset.
If you invoke @kbd{C-x v =} or @kbd{C-u C-x v =} from a buffer that
is neither visiting a version-controlled file nor a VC directory
buffer, these commands generate a diff of all registered files in the
......@@ -801,7 +816,7 @@ the file contents without distraction from the annotations.
@menu
* Registering:: Putting a file under version control.
* VC Status:: Viewing the VC status of files.
* VC Change Log:: Viewing the VC Change Log.
* VC Undo:: Canceling changes before or after check-in.
@end menu
......@@ -857,22 +872,36 @@ particular file using the minibuffer.
initial comment to describe the purpose of this source file. Reading
the initial comment works like reading a log entry (@pxref{Log Buffer}).
@node VC Status
@subsubsection VC Status Commands
@node VC Change Log
@subsubsection VC Change Log
@table @kbd
@item C-x v l
Display revision control state and change history.
Display revision control state and change history
(@code{vc-print-log}).
@item C-x v L
Display the change history for the current repository
(@code{vc-print-root-log}).
@end table
@kindex C-x v l
@findex vc-print-log
To view the detailed revision control status and history of a file,
type @kbd{C-x v l} (@code{vc-print-log}). This pops up a special
buffer named @samp{*vc-change-log*}, in a new window, that displays
the history of changes to the current file, including the text of the
log entries. The point is centered at the revision of the file that
is currently being visited.
The command @kbd{C-x v l} (@code{vc-print-log}) displays a buffer
named @samp{*vc-change-log*} in a new window. This buffer lists the
changes to the current file, including the associated log entries.
(These are the log entries associated with the version control system,
i.e. the ones you enter via the @samp{*VC-Log*} buffer. @xref{Log
Buffer}.) Point is centered at the revision of the file currently
being visited. With a prefix argument, the command prompts for the
revision to center on, and the maximum number of revisions to display.
@findex vc-print-root-log
Type @kbd{C-x v L} (@code{vc-print-root-log}) to display a
@samp{*vc-change-log*} buffer showing the history of the
version-controlled directory tree as a whole. With a prefix argument,
the command prompts for the maximum number of revisions to display.
RCS, SCCS, and CVS do not support this feature.
In the @samp{*vc-change-log*} buffer, you can use the following keys
to move between the logs of revisions and of files, to view past
......@@ -926,6 +955,16 @@ This is useful to see all the changes to all files that the revision
indicated on the current line did when it was committed.
@end table
@vindex vc-log-show-limit
Because fetching many log entries can be slow, the
@samp{*vc-change-log*} buffer displays no more than 2000 revisions by
default. The variable @code{vc-log-show-limit} specifies this limit;
if you set the value to zero, that removes the limit. You can also
increase the number of revisions shown in an existing
@samp{*vc-change-log*} buffer by clicking on the @samp{Show 2X
entries} or @samp{Show unlimited entries} buttons at the end of the
buffer. However, RCS, SCCS, and CVS do not support this feature.
@node VC Undo
@subsubsection Undoing Version Control Actions
......
......@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ languages. These include Lisp mode (which has several variants), C
mode, Fortran mode, and others. The remaining major modes are not
intended for use on users' files; they are used in buffers created for
specific purposes by Emacs, such as Dired mode for buffers made by
Dired (@pxref{Dired}), Mail mode for buffers made by @kbd{C-x m}
Dired (@pxref{Dired}), Message mode for buffers made by @kbd{C-x m}
(@pxref{Sending Mail}), and Shell mode for buffers used for
communicating with an inferior shell process (@pxref{Interactive
Shell}).
......
......@@ -84,11 +84,20 @@ When in DocView mode, you can scroll the current page using the usual
Emacs movement keys: @kbd{C-p}, @kbd{C-n}, @kbd{C-b}, @kbd{C-f}, and
the arrow keys.
@vindex doc-view-continuous
By default, the line-motion keys @kbd{C-p} and @kbd{C-n} stop
scrolling at the beginning and end of the current page, respectively.
However, if you change the variable @code{doc-view-continuous} to a
non-@code{nil} value, then @kbd{C-p} displays the previous page if you
are already at the beginning of the current page, and @kbd{C-n}
displays the next page if you are at the end of the current page.
@findex doc-view-next-page
@findex doc-view-previous-page
To display the next page, type @kbd{n}, @key{next} or @kbd{C-x ]}
(@code{doc-view-next-page}). To display the previous page, type
@kbd{p}, @key{prior} or @kbd{C-x [} (@code{doc-view-previous-page}).
You can also display the next page by typing @kbd{n}, @key{next} or
@kbd{C-x ]} (@code{doc-view-next-page}). To display the previous
page, type @kbd{p}, @key{prior} or @kbd{C-x [}
(@code{doc-view-previous-page}).
@findex doc-view-scroll-up-or-next-page
@findex doc-view-scroll-down-or-previous-page
......@@ -957,12 +966,9 @@ Fetch the next earlier old shell command.
Fetch the next later old shell command.
@kindex M-r @r{(Shell mode)}
@kindex M-s @r{(Shell mode)}
@findex comint-previous-matching-input
@findex comint-next-matching-input
@item M-r @var{regexp} @key{RET}
@itemx M-s @var{regexp} @key{RET}
Search backwards or forwards for old shell commands that match @var{regexp}.
@findex comint-history-isearch-backward-regexp
@item M-r
Begin an incremental regexp search of old shell commands.
@item C-c C-x
@kindex C-c C-x @r{(Shell mode)}
......@@ -995,15 +1001,15 @@ successively more recent shell commands from the buffer.
@kbd{C-@key{UP}} works like @kbd{M-p}, and @kbd{C-@key{DOWN}} like
@kbd{M-n}.
The history search commands @kbd{M-r} and @kbd{M-s} read a regular
expression and search through the history for a matching command. Aside
from the choice of which command to fetch, they work just like @kbd{M-p}
and @kbd{M-n}. If you enter an empty regexp, these commands reuse the
same regexp used last time.
When you find the previous input you want, you can resubmit it by
typing @key{RET}, or you can edit it first and then resubmit it if you
wish. Any partial input you were composing before navigating the
The history search command @kbd{M-r} begins an incremental regular
expression search of previous shell commands. After typing @kbd{M-r},
start typing the desired string or regular expression; the last
matching shell command will be displayed in the current line.
Incremental search commands have their usual effects---for instance,
@kbd{C-s} and @kbd{C-r} search forward and backward for the next match
(@pxref{Incremental Search}). When you find the desired input, type
@key{RET} to terminate the search. This puts the input in the command
line. Any partial input you were composing before navigating the
history list is restored when you go to the beginning or end of the
history ring.
......
......@@ -540,6 +540,11 @@ most input methods---some disable this feature). If
possible characters to type next is displayed in the echo area (but
not when you are in the minibuffer).
Another facility for typing characters not on your keyboard is by
using the @kbd{C-x 8 @key{RET}} (@code{ucs-insert}) to insert a single
character based on its Unicode name or code-point; see @ref{Inserting
Text}.
@node Select Input Method
@section Selecting an Input Method
......@@ -968,15 +973,16 @@ still use an unsuitable coding system if you type its name in response
to the question.)
@vindex sendmail-coding-system
When you send a message with Mail mode (@pxref{Sending Mail}), Emacs has
four different ways to determine the coding system to use for encoding
the message text. It tries the buffer's own value of
@code{buffer-file-coding-system}, if that is non-@code{nil}. Otherwise,
it uses the value of @code{sendmail-coding-system}, if that is
non-@code{nil}. The third way is to use the default coding system for
new files, which is controlled by your choice of language environment,
if that is non-@code{nil}. If all of these three values are @code{nil},
Emacs encodes outgoing mail using the Latin-1 coding system.
When you send a message with Message mode (@pxref{Sending Mail}),
Emacs has four different ways to determine the coding system to use
for encoding the message text. It tries the buffer's own value of
@code{buffer-file-coding-system}, if that is non-@code{nil}.
Otherwise, it uses the value of @code{sendmail-coding-system}, if that
is non-@code{nil}. The third way is to use the default coding system
for new files, which is controlled by your choice of language
environment, if that is non-@code{nil}. If all of these three values
are @code{nil}, Emacs encodes outgoing mail using the Latin-1 coding
system.
@node Text Coding
@section Specifying a Coding System for File Text
......
......@@ -88,11 +88,12 @@ and you can select it by typing @kbd{M-x @var{l}-mode @key{RET}}.
@cindex PostScript mode
@cindex Conf mode
@cindex DNS mode
@cindex Javascript mode
The existing programming language major modes include Lisp, Scheme
(a variant of Lisp) and the Scheme-based DSSSL expression language,
Ada, ASM, AWK, C, C++, Delphi (Object Pascal), Fortran, Icon, IDL
(CORBA), IDLWAVE, Java, Metafont (@TeX{}'s companion for font
creation), Modula2, Objective-C, Octave, Pascal, Perl, Pike,
(CORBA), IDLWAVE, Java, Javascript, Metafont (@TeX{}'s companion for
font creation), Modula2, Objective-C, Octave, Pascal, Perl, Pike,
PostScript, Prolog, Python, Ruby, Simula, Tcl, and VHDL. An
alternative mode for Perl is called CPerl mode. Modes are available
for the scripting languages of the common GNU and Unix shells, VMS
......
......@@ -683,12 +683,12 @@ standard meaning.
@node Rmail Reply
@section Sending Replies
Rmail has several commands that use Mail mode to send outgoing mail.
@xref{Sending Mail}, for information on using Mail mode, including
certain features meant to work with Rmail. What this section documents
are the special commands of Rmail for entering Mail mode. Note that the
usual keys for sending mail---@kbd{C-x m}, @kbd{C-x 4 m}, and @kbd{C-x 5
m}---also work normally in Rmail mode.
Rmail has several commands to send outgoing mail. @xref{Sending
Mail}, for information on using Message mode, including certain
features meant to work with Rmail. What this section documents are
the special commands of Rmail for entering the mail buffer. Note that
the usual keys for sending mail---@kbd{C-x m}, @kbd{C-x 4 m}, and
@kbd{C-x 5 m}---also work normally in Rmail mode.
@table @kbd
@item m
......@@ -735,12 +735,12 @@ the reply command with a numeric argument: @kbd{C-u r} or @kbd{1 r}.
This means to reply only to the sender of the original message.
Once the @samp{*mail*} buffer has been initialized, editing and
sending the mail goes as usual (@pxref{Sending Mail}). You can edit the
presupplied header fields if they are not what you want. You can also
use the commands of Mail mode (@pxref{Mail Mode}), including @kbd{C-c
C-y} which yanks in the message that you are replying to. You can
also switch to the Rmail buffer, select a different message there, switch
back, and yank the new current message.
sending the mail goes as usual (@pxref{Sending Mail}). You can edit
the presupplied header fields if they are not what you want. You can
also use commands such as @kbd{C-c C-y}, which yanks in the message
that you are replying to (@pxref{Mail Commands}). You can also switch
to the Rmail buffer, select a different message there, switch back,
and yank the new current message.
@kindex M-m @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-retry-failure
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -26,11 +26,16 @@ structure.
@xref{Outline Mode}.
@end iftex
@cindex nXML mode
@cindex mode, XML
@cindex mode, nXML
@findex nxml-mode
Emacs has other major modes for text which contains ``embedded''
commands, such as @TeX{} and La@TeX{} (@pxref{TeX Mode}); HTML, SGML,
and XML (@pxref{HTML Mode}); and Groff and Nroff (@pxref{Nroff Mode}).
In addition, you can edit formatted text in WYSIWYG style (``what you
see is what you get''), using Enriched mode (@pxref{Formatted Text}).
commands, such as @TeX{} and La@TeX{} (@pxref{TeX Mode}); HTML and
SGML (@pxref{HTML Mode}); XML (@pxref{Top, nXML Mode,,nxml-mode, nXML
Mode}); and Groff and Nroff (@pxref{Nroff Mode}). In addition, you
can edit formatted text in WYSIWYG style (``what you see is what you
get''), using Enriched mode (@pxref{Formatted Text}).
@cindex ASCII art
If you need to edit pictures made out of text characters (commonly
......@@ -61,7 +66,7 @@ for editing such pictures.
* Text Mode:: The major modes for editing text files.
* Outline Mode:: Editing outlines.
* TeX Mode:: Editing input to the formatter TeX.
* HTML Mode:: Editing HTML, SGML, and XML files.
* HTML Mode:: Editing HTML and SGML files.
* Nroff Mode:: Editing input to the formatter nroff.
* Formatted Text:: Editing formatted text directly in WYSIWYG fashion.
* Text Based Tables:: Editing text-based tables in WYSIWYG fashion.
......@@ -923,10 +928,10 @@ type @kbd{@key{ESC} @key{TAB}} or @kbd{C-M-i}.
@vindex text-mode-hook
Entering Text mode runs the hook @code{text-mode-hook}. Other major
modes related to Text mode also run this hook, followed by hooks of
their own; this includes Paragraph-Indent Text mode, Nroff mode, @TeX{}
mode, Outline mode, and Mail mode. Hook functions on
@code{text-mode-hook} can look at the value of @code{major-mode} to see
which of these modes is actually being entered. @xref{Hooks}.
their own; this includes Paragraph-Indent Text mode, Nroff mode,
@TeX{} mode, Outline mode, and Message mode. Hook functions on
@code{text-mode-hook} can look at the value of @code{major-mode} to
see which of these modes is actually being entered. @xref{Hooks}.
@node Outline Mode
@section Outline Mode
......@@ -1743,29 +1748,17 @@ required. This is set up for Czech---customize the group
Ref@TeX{}. @inforef{Top,, reftex}.
@node HTML Mode
@section SGML, XML, and HTML Modes
@section SGML and HTML Modes
@cindex SGML mode
@cindex HTML mode
@cindex XML mode
@cindex mode, SGML
@cindex mode, HTML
@cindex mode, XML
@findex sgml-mode