Commit 85d6c6e7 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor changes.

parent 0a4fb541
......@@ -20,10 +20,11 @@ called the @dfn{current buffer}. Often we say that a command operates on
``the buffer'' as if there were only one; but really this means that the
command operates on the selected buffer (most commands do).
When Emacs has multiple windows, each window has a chosen buffer which
is displayed there, but at any time only one of the windows is selected and
its chosen buffer is the selected buffer. Each window's mode line displays
the name of the buffer that the window is displaying (@pxref{Windows}).
When Emacs has multiple windows, each window has its own chosen
buffer and displays it; at any time, only one of the windows is
selected, and its chosen buffer is the selected buffer. Each window's
mode line normally displays the name of the window's chosen buffer
(@pxref{Windows}).
Each buffer has a name, which can be of any length, and you can select
any buffer by giving its name. Most buffers are made by visiting files,
......@@ -447,6 +448,9 @@ both @var{base-buffer} and @var{indirect-name} using the minibuffer.
@node Buffer Convenience
@section Convenience Features and Customization of Buffer Handling
This section describes several modes and features that make it more
convenient to switch between buffers.
@menu
* Uniquify:: Buffer names can contain directory parts.
* Iswitchb:: Switching between buffers with substrings.
......@@ -522,6 +526,10 @@ and @kbd{C-r} to rotate the list until the desired buffer is first.
@key{TAB} while entering the buffer name performs completion on the
string you have entered, based on the displayed list of buffers.
To enable Iswitchb mode, type @kbd{M-x iswitchb-mode}, or customize
the variable @code{iswitchb-mode} to @code{t} (@pxref{Easy
Customization}).
@node Buffer Menus
@subsection Customizing Buffer Menus
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ minibuffer of another frame.
instance, if you put text in the kill ring in one frame, you can yank it
in another frame. If you exit Emacs through @kbd{C-x C-c} in one frame,
it terminates all the frames. To delete just one frame, use @kbd{C-x 5
0}.
0} (that is zero, not @kbd{o}).
To avoid confusion, we reserve the word ``window'' for the
subdivisions that Emacs implements, and never use it to refer to a
......@@ -193,8 +193,8 @@ Then yank it in Emacs with @kbd{C-y} or @kbd{Mouse-2}.
of the kill ring, it sets the @dfn{primary selection} in the X server.
This is how other X clients can access the text. Emacs also stores the
text in the cut buffer, but only if the text is short enough
(@code{x-cut-buffer-max} specifies the maximum number of characters);
putting long strings in the cut buffer can be slow.
(the value of @code{x-cut-buffer-max} specifies the maximum number of
characters); putting long strings in the cut buffer can be slow.
The commands to yank the first entry in the kill ring actually check
first for a primary selection in another program; after that, they check
......@@ -216,7 +216,9 @@ without setting point or the mark.
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the place where you press
down the button, and the other end at the place where you release it
(@code{mouse-set-secondary}). The highlighting appears and changes as
you drag.
you drag. You can control the appearance of the highlighting by
customizing the @code{secondary-selection} face (@pxref{Face
Customization}).
If you move the mouse off the top or bottom of the window while
dragging, the window scrolls at a steady rate until you move the mouse
......@@ -366,14 +368,14 @@ horizontally, above the place in the mode line where you click.
@kindex C-Mouse-2 @r{(scroll bar)}
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} on a scroll bar splits the corresponding window
vertically, unless you are using an X toolkit's implentation of
vertically, unless you are using an X toolkit's implementation of
scroll bars. @xref{Split Window}.
The commands above apply to areas of the mode line which do not have
special mouse bindings of their own. Some areas, such as the buffer
name and the major mode name, have their own special mouse bindings.
Emacs displays information about these bindings when you hold the
mouse over such a place.
mouse over such a place (@pxref{Tooltips}).
@node Creating Frames
@section Creating Frames
......@@ -832,7 +834,8 @@ tooltip-mode}. The customization group @code{tooltip} controls
various aspects of how tooltips work. When Tooltip mode is disabled,
the help text is displayed in the echo area instead.
As of Emacs 21.1, tooltips are not supported on MS-Windows.
As of Emacs 21.1, tooltips are not supported on MS-Windows.
So help text always appears in the echo area.
@node Mouse Avoidance
@section Mouse Avoidance
......
......@@ -101,10 +101,11 @@ not appear in inverse video.
@kindex C-Mouse-2 @r{(scroll bar)}
You can split a window horizontally or vertically by clicking
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} in the mode line or the scroll bar. The line of
splitting goes through the place where you click: if you click on the
mode line, the new scroll bar goes above the spot; if you click in the
scroll bar, the mode line of the split window is side by side with your
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} in the mode line or the scroll bar. (This does not
work in scroll bars implemented by X toolkits.) The line of splitting
goes through the place where you click: if you click on the mode line,
the new scroll bar goes above the spot; if you click in the scroll
bar, the mode line of the split window is side by side with your
click.
@vindex truncate-partial-width-windows
......@@ -119,14 +120,15 @@ independent of the buffer being displayed and its value for
@xref{Display}.
@vindex split-window-keep-point
If @code{split-window-keep-point} is non-@code{nil}, the default, both
of the windows resulting from @kbd{C-x 2} inherit the value of point
from the window that was split. This means that scrolling is
If @code{split-window-keep-point} is non-@code{nil}, the default,
both of the windows resulting from @kbd{C-x 2} inherit the value of
point from the window that was split. This means that scrolling is
inevitable. If this variable is @code{nil}, then @kbd{C-x 2} tries to
avoid shifting any text the screen, by putting point in each window at a
position already visible in the window. It also selects whichever
window contain the screen line that the cursor was previously on. Some
users prefer the latter mode on slow terminals.
avoid scrolling the text currently visible on the screen, by putting
point in each window at a position already visible in the window. It
also selects whichever window contain the screen line that the cursor
was previously on. Some users prefer the latter mode on slow
terminals.
@node Other Window
@section Using Other Windows
......
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