Commit 88c26f5c authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

* emacs-lisp-intro.texi: Fix typo in name of `find-tag' command.

parent ad10faa1
2010-02-16 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* emacs-lisp-intro.texi: Fix typo in name of `find-tag' command.
2010-02-01 Stefan Monnier <monnier@iro.umontreal.ca> 2010-02-01 Stefan Monnier <monnier@iro.umontreal.ca>
* emacs-lisp-intro.texi (Text and Auto-fill, Mode Line): * emacs-lisp-intro.texi (Text and Auto-fill, Mode Line):
......
...@@ -229,7 +229,8 @@ people who are not programmers. ...@@ -229,7 +229,8 @@ people who are not programmers.
Edition @value{edition-number}, @value{update-date} Edition @value{edition-number}, @value{update-date}
@sp 1 @sp 1
Copyright @copyright{} 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2001, Copyright @copyright{} 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2001,
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@sp 1 @sp 1
   
@iftex @iftex
...@@ -4732,16 +4733,16 @@ definition. ...@@ -4732,16 +4733,16 @@ definition.
@end ignore @end ignore
   
More generally, if you want to see a function in its original source More generally, if you want to see a function in its original source
file, you can use the @code{find-tags} function to jump to it. file, you can use the @code{find-tag} function to jump to it.
@code{find-tags} works with a wide variety of languages, not just @code{find-tag} works with a wide variety of languages, not just
Lisp, and C, and it works with non-programming text as well. For Lisp, and C, and it works with non-programming text as well. For
example, @code{find-tags} will jump to the various nodes in the example, @code{find-tag} will jump to the various nodes in the
Texinfo source file of this document. Texinfo source file of this document.
The @code{find-tags} function depends on `tags tables' that record The @code{find-tag} function depends on `tags tables' that record
the locations of the functions, variables, and other items to which the locations of the functions, variables, and other items to which
@code{find-tags} jumps. @code{find-tag} jumps.
   
To use the @code{find-tags} command, type @kbd{M-.} (i.e., press the To use the @code{find-tag} command, type @kbd{M-.} (i.e., press the
period key while holding down the @key{META} key, or else type the period key while holding down the @key{META} key, or else type the
@key{ESC} key and then type the period key), and then, at the prompt, @key{ESC} key and then type the period key), and then, at the prompt,
type in the name of the function whose source code you want to see, type in the name of the function whose source code you want to see,
...@@ -4753,7 +4754,7 @@ screen. To switch back to your current buffer, type @kbd{C-x b ...@@ -4753,7 +4754,7 @@ screen. To switch back to your current buffer, type @kbd{C-x b
   
@c !!! 22.1.1 tags table location in this paragraph @c !!! 22.1.1 tags table location in this paragraph
@cindex TAGS table, specifying @cindex TAGS table, specifying
@findex find-tags @findex find-tag
Depending on how the initial default values of your copy of Emacs are Depending on how the initial default values of your copy of Emacs are
set, you may also need to specify the location of your `tags table', set, you may also need to specify the location of your `tags table',
which is a file called @file{TAGS}. For example, if you are which is a file called @file{TAGS}. For example, if you are
...@@ -4778,7 +4779,7 @@ M-x compile RET etags *.el RET ...@@ -4778,7 +4779,7 @@ M-x compile RET etags *.el RET
For more information, see @ref{etags, , Create Your Own @file{TAGS} File}. For more information, see @ref{etags, , Create Your Own @file{TAGS} File}.
   
After you become more familiar with Emacs Lisp, you will find that you will After you become more familiar with Emacs Lisp, you will find that you will
frequently use @code{find-tags} to navigate your way around source code; frequently use @code{find-tag} to navigate your way around source code;
and you will create your own @file{TAGS} tables. and you will create your own @file{TAGS} tables.
   
@cindex Library, as term for `file' @cindex Library, as term for `file'
...@@ -18961,7 +18962,7 @@ introduction, it comes as a Texinfo source file, so you can read it ...@@ -18961,7 +18962,7 @@ introduction, it comes as a Texinfo source file, so you can read it
on-line and as a typeset, printed book.) on-line and as a typeset, printed book.)
   
Go to the other on-line help that is part of GNU Emacs: the on-line Go to the other on-line help that is part of GNU Emacs: the on-line
documentation for all functions and variables, and @code{find-tags}, documentation for all functions and variables, and @code{find-tag},
the program that takes you to sources. the program that takes you to sources.
   
Here is an example of how I explore the sources. Because of its name, Here is an example of how I explore the sources. Because of its name,
......
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