Commit 88c26f5c authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

* emacs-lisp-intro.texi: Fix typo in name of `find-tag' command.

parent ad10faa1
2010-02-16 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* emacs-lisp-intro.texi: Fix typo in name of `find-tag' command.
2010-02-01 Stefan Monnier <monnier@iro.umontreal.ca>
* emacs-lisp-intro.texi (Text and Auto-fill, Mode Line):
......
......@@ -229,7 +229,8 @@ people who are not programmers.
Edition @value{edition-number}, @value{update-date}
@sp 1
Copyright @copyright{} 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2001,
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@sp 1
 
@iftex
......@@ -4732,16 +4733,16 @@ definition.
@end ignore
 
More generally, if you want to see a function in its original source
file, you can use the @code{find-tags} function to jump to it.
@code{find-tags} works with a wide variety of languages, not just
file, you can use the @code{find-tag} function to jump to it.
@code{find-tag} works with a wide variety of languages, not just
Lisp, and C, and it works with non-programming text as well. For
example, @code{find-tags} will jump to the various nodes in the
example, @code{find-tag} will jump to the various nodes in the
Texinfo source file of this document.
The @code{find-tags} function depends on `tags tables' that record
The @code{find-tag} function depends on `tags tables' that record
the locations of the functions, variables, and other items to which
@code{find-tags} jumps.
@code{find-tag} jumps.
 
To use the @code{find-tags} command, type @kbd{M-.} (i.e., press the
To use the @code{find-tag} command, type @kbd{M-.} (i.e., press the
period key while holding down the @key{META} key, or else type the
@key{ESC} key and then type the period key), and then, at the prompt,
type in the name of the function whose source code you want to see,
......@@ -4753,7 +4754,7 @@ screen. To switch back to your current buffer, type @kbd{C-x b
 
@c !!! 22.1.1 tags table location in this paragraph
@cindex TAGS table, specifying
@findex find-tags
@findex find-tag
Depending on how the initial default values of your copy of Emacs are
set, you may also need to specify the location of your `tags table',
which is a file called @file{TAGS}. For example, if you are
......@@ -4778,7 +4779,7 @@ M-x compile RET etags *.el RET
For more information, see @ref{etags, , Create Your Own @file{TAGS} File}.
 
After you become more familiar with Emacs Lisp, you will find that you will
frequently use @code{find-tags} to navigate your way around source code;
frequently use @code{find-tag} to navigate your way around source code;
and you will create your own @file{TAGS} tables.
 
@cindex Library, as term for `file'
......@@ -18961,7 +18962,7 @@ introduction, it comes as a Texinfo source file, so you can read it
on-line and as a typeset, printed book.)
 
Go to the other on-line help that is part of GNU Emacs: the on-line
documentation for all functions and variables, and @code{find-tags},
documentation for all functions and variables, and @code{find-tag},
the program that takes you to sources.
 
Here is an example of how I explore the sources. Because of its name,
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment