Commit 88edc57f authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Fix some doc/misc cross-references to separate manuals.

parent 2075e843
2012-12-22 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* autotype.texi, bovine.texi, ede.texi, eieio.texi, pcl-cvs.texi:
Fix cross-references to separate manuals.
* Makefile.in (gfdl): New variable. Use throughout where
appropriate so that targets depend on doclicense.texi.
......
......@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ over and over again. This is especially true of form letters and programming
language constructs. Project-specific header comments, flow-control
constructs or magic numbers are essentially the same every time. Emacs has
various features for doing tedious and repetitive typing chores for you
in addition to the Abbrev features (@pxref{(emacs)Abbrevs}).
in addition to the Abbrev features (@pxref{Abbrevs,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}).
One solution is using skeletons, flexible rules that say what to
insert, and how to do it. Various programming language modes offer some
......@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ completions and expansions of text at point.
programming language you are using, skeletons are a means of accomplishing
this. Normally skeletons each have a command of their own, that, when called,
will insert the skeleton. These commands can be issued in the usual ways
(@pxref{(emacs)Commands}). Modes that offer various skeletons will often
(@pxref{Commands,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}). Modes that offer various skeletons will often
bind these to key-sequences on the @kbd{C-c} prefix, as well as having
an @cite{Insert} menu and maybe even predefined abbrevs for them
(@pxref{Skeletons as Abbrevs}).
......@@ -146,18 +146,18 @@ accomplishing this, and can even, in the case of programming languages,
reindent the wrapped code for you.
Skeleton commands take an optional numeric prefix argument
(@pxref{(emacs)Arguments}). This is interpreted in two different ways depending
(@pxref{Arguments,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}). This is interpreted in two different ways depending
on whether the prefix is positive, i.e., forwards oriented, or negative,
i.e., backwards oriented.
A positive prefix means to wrap the skeleton around that many
following words. This is accomplished by putting the words there where
the point is normally left after that skeleton is inserted (@pxref{Using
Skeletons}). The point (@pxref{(emacs)Point}) is left at the next
Skeletons}). The point (@pxref{Point,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) is left at the next
interesting spot in the skeleton instead.
A negative prefix means to do something similar with that many previously
marked interregions (@pxref{(emacs)Mark}). In the simplest case, if you type
marked interregions (@pxref{Mark,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}). In the simplest case, if you type
@kbd{M--} just before issuing the skeleton command, that will wrap the
skeleton around the current region, just like a positive argument would have
wrapped it around a number of words.
......@@ -189,8 +189,8 @@ tried to follow the order in which you marked these points.
@cindex skeletons as abbrevs
Rather than use a key binding for every skeleton command, you can also
define an abbreviation (@pxref{(emacs)Defining Abbrevs}) that will expand
(@pxref{(emacs)Expanding Abbrevs}) into the skeleton.
define an abbreviation (@pxref{Defining Abbrevs,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) that will expand
(@pxref{Expanding Abbrevs,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) into the skeleton.
Say you want @samp{ifst} to be an abbreviation for the C language if
statement. You will tell Emacs that @samp{ifst} expands to the empty string
......@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ skeleton. The first argument is the command name, the second is a
documentation string, and the rest is an interactor and any number of skeleton
elements together forming a skeleton. This skeleton is assigned to a variable
of the same name as the command and can thus be overridden from your
@file{~/.emacs} file (@pxref{(emacs)Init File}).
@file{~/.emacs} file (@pxref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}).
......@@ -309,14 +309,14 @@ fingers backwards, this can be quite relieving too.
@findex skeleton-pair-insert-maybe
@vindex skeleton-pair
This is done by binding the first key (@pxref{(emacs)Rebinding}) of
This is done by binding the first key (@pxref{Rebinding,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) of
the pair to @code{skeleton-pair-insert-maybe} instead of
@code{self-insert-command}. The ``maybe'' comes from the fact that
this at-first surprising behavior is initially turned off. To enable
it, you must set @code{skeleton-pair} to some non-@code{nil} value.
And even then, a positive argument (@pxref{(emacs)Arguments}) will
And even then, a positive argument (@pxref{Arguments,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) will
make this key behave like a self-inserting key
(@pxref{(emacs)Inserting Text}).
(@pxref{Inserting Text,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}).
@vindex skeleton-pair-on-word
While this breaks with the stated intention of always balancing pairs, it
......@@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ the buffer. The main application for this function, as its name suggests,
is to have it be called automatically every time an empty, and only an
empty file is visited. This is accomplished by putting @code{(add-hook
'find-file-hook 'auto-insert)} into your @file{~/.emacs} file
(@pxref{(emacs)Init File}).
(@pxref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}).
@vindex auto-insert-alist
What gets inserted, if anything, is determined by the variable
......@@ -392,10 +392,10 @@ source files insert the usual header, with a copyright of your
environment variable @env{$ORGANIZATION} or else the FSF, and prompt
for valid keywords describing the contents. Files in a @file{bin}
directory for which Emacs could determine no specialized mode
(@pxref{(emacs)Choosing Modes}) are set to Shell script mode.
(@pxref{Choosing Modes,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) are set to Shell script mode.
@findex define-auto-insert
In Lisp (@pxref{(emacs)Init File}) you can use the function
In Lisp (@pxref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) you can use the function
@code{define-auto-insert} to add to or modify
@code{auto-insert-alist}. See its documentation with @kbd{C-h f
define-auto-insert}.
......@@ -438,7 +438,7 @@ expression that matched the filename.
@kbd{M-x copyright} is a skeleton inserting command, that adds a copyright
notice at the point. The ``by'' part is taken from your environment variable
@env{$ORGANIZATION} or if that isn't set you are prompted for it. If the
buffer has a comment syntax (@pxref{(emacs)Comments}), this is inserted as a comment.
buffer has a comment syntax (@pxref{Comments,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}), this is inserted as a comment.
@findex copyright-update
@vindex copyright-limit
......@@ -450,13 +450,13 @@ existing ones, in the same format as the preceding year, i.e., 1994, '94 or 94.
If a dash-separated year list up to last year is found, that is extended to
current year, else the year is added separated by a comma. Or it replaces
them when this is called with a prefix argument. If a header referring to a
wrong version of the GNU General Public License (@pxref{(emacs)Copying}) is found,
wrong version of the GNU General Public License (@pxref{Copying,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) is found,
that is updated too.
An interesting application for this function is to have it be called
automatically every time a file is saved. This is accomplished by
putting @code{(add-hook 'before-save-hook 'copyright-update)} into
your @file{~/.emacs} file (@pxref{(emacs)Init File}). Alternative,
your @file{~/.emacs} file (@pxref{Init File,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}). Alternative,
you can do @kbd{M-x customize-variable @key{RET} before-save-hook
@key{RET}}. @code{copyright-update} is conveniently listed as an
option in the customization buffer.
......
......@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ of simplified Emacs Lisp expressions for concocting the parse tree.
In bison, each time an element of @var{components} is found, it is
@dfn{shifted} onto the parser stack. (The stack of matched elements.)
When all @var{components}' elements have been matched, it is
@dfn{reduced} to @var{result}. @xref{(bison)Algorithm}.
@dfn{reduced} to @var{result}. @xref{Algorithm,,, bison, The GNU Bison Manual}.
A particular @var{result} written into your grammar becomes
the parser's goal. It is designated by a @code{%start} statement
......
......@@ -1110,7 +1110,7 @@ superclasses. In this way, specific behaviors such as how a project
is saved, or how a target is compiled can be customized by a project
author in detail. @ede{} communicates to these project objects via an
API using methods. The commands you use in @ede{} mode are high-level
functional wrappers over these methods. @xref{(eieio)Top}. For
functional wrappers over these methods. @xref{Top,,, eieio, EIEIO manual}. For
details on using @eieio{} to extending classes, and writing methods.
If you intend to extend @ede{}, it is most likely that a new target type is
......@@ -1361,7 +1361,8 @@ association when a file is loaded. It is generally unnecessary to
override this unless you keep auxiliary files.
@end table
These methods are used by the semantic package extensions @xref{(semantic)Top}.
These methods are used by the semantic package extensions.
@xref{Top,,, semantic, Semantic manual}.
@table @code
@item ede-buffer-header-file
......
......@@ -446,7 +446,7 @@ that default value with @code{oset-default}. @ref{Accessing Slots}.
@item :type
An unquoted type specifier used to validate data set into this slot.
@xref{(cl)Type Predicates}.
@xref{Type Predicates,,,cl,Common Lisp Extensions}.
Here are some examples:
@table @code
@item symbol
......@@ -1571,7 +1571,7 @@ all these classes, subsection headings, and indexes.
Each class will be indexed using the texinfo labeled index
@var{indexstring} which is a two letter description.
@xref{(texinfo) New Indices}.
@xref{New Indices,,,texinfo,Texinfo manual}.
To use this command, the texinfo macro
......@@ -1874,8 +1874,9 @@ instead pre-builds a method that gets the slot's value.
@item :type
Specifier uses the @code{typep} function from the @file{cl}
package. @xref{(cl)Type Predicates}. It therefore has the same issues as
that package. Extensions include the ability to provide object names.
package. @xref{Type Predicates,,,cl,Common Lisp Extensions}.
It therefore has the same issues as that package. Extensions include
the ability to provide object names.
@end table
Defclass also supports class options, but does not currently use values
......
......@@ -1169,13 +1169,13 @@ kill the contents of the buffer with @kbd{C-w}.
@findex log-edit-insert-changelog
If you work by writing entries in the @file{ChangeLog}
(@pxref{(emacs)Change Log}) and then commit the change under revision
(@pxref{Change Log,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}) and then commit the change under revision
control, you can generate the Log Edit text from the ChangeLog using
@kbd{C-c C-a} (@kbd{log-edit-insert-changelog}). This looks for
entries for the file(s) concerned in the top entry in the ChangeLog
and uses those paragraphs as the log text. This text is only inserted
if the top entry was made under your user name on the current date.
@xref{(emacs)Change Logs and VC}, for the opposite way of
@xref{Change Logs and VC,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}, for the opposite way of
working---generating ChangeLog entries from the revision control log.
In the Log Edit buffer, @kbd{C-c C-f} (@kbd{M-x log-edit-show-files})
......
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