Commit 892c6176 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Avoid saying "Unix" in a way that includes GNU.

parent 2e78ad14
......@@ -97,8 +97,7 @@ buffers,
@item
@file{locate.el} which interfaces to the @code{locate} command,
@item
@file{find-lisp.el}, an emulation of the Unix @code{find} command in
Emacs Lisp,
@file{find-lisp.el}, an Emacs Lisp emulation of the @code{find} program,
@item
@file{net-utils.el}, and
@item
......@@ -1330,7 +1329,7 @@ Dale R.@: Worley wrote @file{emerge.el}, a package for interactively
merging two versions of a file.
@item
Francis J.@: Wright wrote @code{WoMan}, a package for browsing Unix
Francis J.@: Wright wrote @code{WoMan}, a package for browsing
manual pages without the @code{man} command.
@item
......
......@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
@comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
@ifinfo
This file documents Ediff, a comprehensive visual interface to Unix diff
This file documents Ediff, a comprehensive visual interface to diff
and patch utilities.
Copyright 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
......@@ -1071,7 +1071,7 @@ set on a per-buffer basis. Therefore, use @code{setq-default} to change
this variable globally.
@cindex Multi-file patches
A multi-file patch is a concatenated output of several runs of the Unix
A multi-file patch is a concatenated output of several runs of the
@code{diff} command (some versions of @code{diff} let you create a
multi-file patch in just one run). Ediff facilitates creation of
multi-file patches as follows. If you are in a session group buffer
......@@ -1821,8 +1821,8 @@ format yet.
@vindex ediff-coding-system-for-read
This variable specifies the coding system to use when reading the output
that the programs @code{diff3} and @code{diff} send to Emacs. The default
is @code{raw-text}, and this should work fine in Unix and in most
cases under Windows NT/95/98/2000. There are @code{diff} programs
is @code{raw-text}, and this should work fine on GNU, Unix, and in most
cases under Windows NT/95/98/2000. There are @code{diff} programs
for which the default option doesn't work under Windows. In such cases,
@code{raw-text-dos} might work. If not, you will have to experiment with
other coding systems or use GNU diff.
......
......@@ -753,12 +753,12 @@ merge them with the values from @code{mailcap-mime-data}. Components of
appropriate for the system. If @var{force} is non-@code{nil}, the files
are re-parsed even if they have been parsed already. If @var{path} is
omitted, use the value of environment variable @code{MAILCAPS} if it is
set; otherwise (on Unix) use the path defined in RFC 1524, plus
set; otherwise (on GNU and Unix) use the path defined in RFC 1524, plus
@file{/usr/local/etc/mailcap}.
@end defun
@defun mailcap-parse-mimetypes &optional path force
Parse all the mimetypes specified in a Unix-style path string @var{path}
Parse all the mimetypes specified in a path string @var{path}
and merge them with the values from @code{mailcap-mime-extensions}.
Components of @var{path} are separated by the @code{path-separator}
character appropriate for the system. If @var{path} is omitted, use the
......
......@@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ processes --- process, subshell, compilation, and job control support.
terminals --- support for terminal types.
tex --- support for the @TeX{} formatter.
tools --- programming tools.
unix --- front-ends/assistants for, or emulators of, Unix features.
unix --- front-ends/assistants for, or emulators of, system features.
vms --- support code for VMS.
wp --- word processing.
@end display
......
......@@ -1737,7 +1737,6 @@ Normal hook. Executed when @file{idlwave.el} is loaded.
@cindex Comint, Emacs package
@cindex Windows
@cindex MacOS
@cindex Unix
The IDLWAVE shell is an Emacs major mode which allows to run the IDL
program as an inferior process of Emacs. It can be used to work with
......@@ -1746,8 +1745,8 @@ to debug these programs. The IDLWAVE shell uses @file{comint}, an Emacs
packages which handles the communication with the IDL program.
Unfortunately IDL for Windows and MacOS does not allow the interaction
with Emacs@footnote{Please inform the maintainer if you come up with a way
to make the IDLWAVE shell work on these systems.} - so the IDLWAVE shell
only works under Unix.
to make the IDLWAVE shell work on these systems.}, so the IDLWAVE shell
only works under GNU and Unix.
@menu
* Starting the Shell:: How to launch IDL as a subprocess
......@@ -2433,7 +2432,6 @@ Controls under what circumstances routine info is updated automatically.
@cindex IDL library routine info
@cindex Windows
@cindex MacOS
@cindex Unix
@cindex IDL variable @code{!DIR}
@cindex @code{!DIR}, IDL variable
......@@ -2446,7 +2444,7 @@ file will contain lisp code, its name should end in @file{.el}. Under
Windows and MacOS, you also need to specify the search path for IDL
library files in the variable @code{idlwave-library-path}, and the
location of the IDL directory (the value of the @code{!DIR} system
variable) in the variable @code{idlwave-system-directory}. Under UNIX,
variable) in the variable @code{idlwave-system-directory}. Under Unix and GNU,
these values will be automatically inferred from an IDLWAVE
shell.
......@@ -2479,11 +2477,11 @@ File for routine information of the IDL library.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-library-path
IDL library path for Windows and MacOS. Not needed under Unix.
IDL library path for Windows and MacOS. Not needed under GNU and Unix.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-system-directory
The IDL system directory for Windows and MacOS. Not needed under UNIX.
The IDL system directory for Windows and MacOS. Not needed under GNU and Unix.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-special-lib-alist
......
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ unexec (@code{dump-emacs}), asynchronous subprocesses
(@code{start-process}), and networking (@code{open-network-stream}).
As a result, packages such as Gnus, GUD, and Comint do not work.
Since external Unix programs to handle commands such as
Since external programs to handle commands such as
@code{print-buffer} and @code{diff} are not available on the Mac OS,
they are not supported in the Mac OS version.
......@@ -170,16 +170,16 @@ EMACS_UNIBYTE=1
@end example
So when Emacs requests a file name, doing file name completion on
@file{/} will display all volumes on the system. As in Unix, @file{..}
can be used to go up a directory level.
@file{/} will display all volumes on the system. You can use @file{..}
to go up a directory level.
To access files and folders on the desktop, look in the folder
@file{Desktop Folder} in your boot volume (this folder is usually
invisible in the Mac @code{Finder}).
Emacs creates the Mac folder @file{:Preferences:Emacs:} in the
@file{System Folder} and uses it as the temporary directory. The Unix
emulation code maps the Unix directory @file{/tmp} to it. Therefore it
@file{System Folder} and uses it as the temporary directory. Emacs
maps the directory name @file{/tmp/} to that. Therefore it
is best to avoid naming a volume @file{tmp}. If everything works
correctly, the program should leave no files in it when it exits. You
should be able to set the environment variable @code{TMPDIR} to use
......@@ -229,6 +229,6 @@ string.
@findex mac-filename-to-unix
@findex unix-filename-to-mac
The function @code{mac-filename-to-unix} takes a Mac file name and
returns the Unix equivalent. The function @code{unix-filename-to-mac}
returns the Posix equivalent. The function @code{unix-filename-to-mac}
performs the opposite conversion. They are useful for constructing
AppleScript commands to be passed to @code{do-applescript}.
......@@ -1235,7 +1235,7 @@ A function to be called if @var{predicate} returns non-@code{nil}.
@vindex message-fcc-handler-function
A function called to save outgoing articles. This function will be
called with the name of the file to store the article in. The default
function is @code{message-output} which saves in Unix mailbox format.
function is @code{message-output} which saves in inbox format.
@item message-courtesy-message
@vindex message-courtesy-message
......
......@@ -1055,7 +1055,7 @@ displays the word @samp{page}.
screenful of output since your last input, it pauses, displaying
@samp{**MORE**} in the mode-line. Type @key{SPC} to display the next
screenful of output. Type @kbd{?} to see your other options. The
interface is similar to the Unix @code{more} program.
interface is similar to the @code{more} program.
@node Remote Host
@subsection Remote Host Shell
......
......@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@ EOL conversion is determined by @code{file-name-buffer-file-type-alist}.
Printing commands, such as @code{lpr-buffer} (@pxref{Hardcopy}) and
@code{ps-print-buffer} (@pxref{PostScript}) can work in MS-DOS and
MS-Windows by sending the output to one of the printer ports, if a
Unix-style @code{lpr} program is unavailable. The same Emacs
Posix-style @code{lpr} program is unavailable. The same Emacs
variables control printing on all systems (@pxref{Hardcopy}), but in
some cases they have different default values on MS-DOS and
MS-Windows.
......@@ -572,10 +572,10 @@ only.
@cindex international support @r{(MS-DOS)}
Emacs on MS-DOS supports the same international character sets as it
does on Unix and other platforms (@pxref{International}), including
does on GNU, Unix and other platforms (@pxref{International}), including
coding systems for converting between the different character sets.
However, due to incompatibilities between MS-DOS/MS-Windows and Unix,
there are several DOS-specific aspects of this support that users should
However, due to incompatibilities between MS-DOS/MS-Windows and other systems,
there are several DOS-specific aspects of this support that you should
be aware of. This section describes these aspects.
@table @kbd
......@@ -658,7 +658,7 @@ system and the default coding system for file I/O are set to the proper
@code{cp@var{nnn}} coding system at startup, it is normal for the mode
line on MS-DOS to begin with @samp{-DD\-}. @xref{Mode Line}.
Far-Eastern DOS terminals do not use the @code{cp@var{nnn}} coding
systems, and thus their initial mode line looks like on Unix.
systems, and thus their initial mode line looks like the Emacs default.
Since the codepage number also indicates which script you are using,
Emacs automatically runs @code{set-language-environment} to select the
......@@ -741,11 +741,11 @@ finishes.
Spell checking also works, by means of special support for synchronous
invocation of the @code{ispell} program. This is slower than the
asynchronous invocation on Unix.
asynchronous invocation on other platforms
Instead of the Shell mode, which doesn't work on MS-DOS, you can use
the @kbd{M-x eshell} command. This invokes the Eshell package that
implements a Unix-like shell entirely in Emacs Lisp.
implements a Posix-like shell entirely in Emacs Lisp.
By contrast, Emacs compiled as native Windows application
@strong{does} support asynchronous subprocesses. @xref{Windows
......
\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
@c
@c $Id: speedbar.texi,v 1.6 2000/12/05 23:06:42 fx Exp $
@c $Id: speedbar.texi,v 1.7 2001/02/17 17:02:12 rms Exp $
@c
@c This file is part of GNU Emacs
......@@ -515,9 +515,9 @@ categories are included in that sub-group. @xref{Tag Hierarchy Methods}.
@section Hidden Files
@cindex hidden files
On Unix, a hidden file is a file whose name starts with a period. They
are hidden from a regular directory listing because the user is not
generally interested in them.
On GNU and Unix systems, a hidden file is a file whose name starts
with a period. They are hidden from a regular directory listing
because the user is not generally interested in them.
In speedbar, a hidden file is a file which isn't very interesting and
might prove distracting to the user. Any uninteresting files are
......
......@@ -685,7 +685,7 @@ stimulates the bug.@refill
@item
If non-ASCII text or internationalization is relevant, the locale that
was current when you started Emacs. On GNU/Linux and Unix systems, or
if you use a Unix-style shell such as Bash, you can use this shell
if you use a Posix-style shell such as Bash, you can use this shell
command to view the relevant values:
@smallexample
......
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