Commit 8bf27c8a authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Small edits for doc/emacs/glossary.texi

* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Copyedits.
Use Texinfo-recommended convention for quotes and punctuation.
Comment out a few specialized (Rmail) items.
parent 2d562c0f
2012-04-04 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* glossary.texi (Glossary): Copyedits.
Use Texinfo-recommended convention for quotes and punctuation.
Comment out a few specialized (Rmail) items.
2012-04-03 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* sending.texi (Mail Misc): Fix an index entry.
......
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
@table @asis
@item Abbrev
An abbrev is a text string which expands into a different text string
An abbrev is a text string that expands into a different text string
when present in the buffer. For example, you might define a few letters
as an abbrev for a long phrase that you want to insert frequently.
@xref{Abbrevs}.
......@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ key labeled @key{ALT} that is really a @key{META} key.) @xref{User
Input, Alt}.
@item Argument
See `numeric argument.'
See `numeric argument'.
@item @acronym{ASCII} character
An @acronym{ASCII} character is either an @acronym{ASCII} control
......@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ letter, or the Control version of one of the characters @samp{@@[\]^_?}.
@item @acronym{ASCII} printing character
@acronym{ASCII} printing characters include letters, digits, space, and these
punctuation characters: @samp{!@@#$%^& *()_-+=|\~` @{@}[]:;"' <>,.?/}.
punctuation characters: @samp{!@@#$%^&*()_-+=|\~`@{@}[]:;"'<>,.?/}.
@item Auto Fill Mode
Auto Fill mode is a minor mode (q.v.@:) in which text that you insert is
......@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ be preserved if the buffer is lost due to a system error or user error.
@item Autoloading
Emacs can automatically load Lisp libraries when a Lisp program requests a
function from those libraries. This is called `autoloading.'
function from those libraries. This is called `autoloading'.
@xref{Lisp Libraries}.
@item Backtrace
......@@ -72,8 +72,8 @@ Emacs can balance parentheses (or other matching delimiters) either
manually or automatically. You do manual balancing with the commands
to move over parenthetical groupings (@pxref{Moving by Parens}).
Automatic balancing works by blinking or highlighting the delimiter
that matches the one you just inserted (@pxref{Matching,,Matching
Parens}).
that matches the one you just inserted, or inserting the matching
delimiter for you (@pxref{Matching,,Matching Parens}).
@item Balanced Expressions
A balanced expression is a syntactically recognizable expression, such
......@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ as a symbol, number, string constant, block, or parenthesized expression
in C. @xref{Expressions,Balanced Expressions}.
@item Balloon Help
See `tooltips.'
See `tooltips'.
@item Base Buffer
A base buffer is a buffer whose text is shared by an indirect buffer
......@@ -100,12 +100,12 @@ all key sequences are recorded in the keymaps (q.v.@:). @xref{Keymaps}.
@item Blank Lines
Blank lines are lines that contain only whitespace. Emacs has several
commands for operating on the blank lines in the buffer.
commands for operating on the blank lines in the buffer. @xref{Blank Lines}.
@item Bookmark
Bookmarks are akin to registers (q.v.@:) in that they record positions
in buffers to which you can return later. Unlike registers, bookmarks
persist between Emacs sessions.
persist between Emacs sessions. @xref{Bookmarks}.
@item Border
A border is a thin space along the edge of the frame, used just for
......@@ -118,13 +118,13 @@ X}). Borders are not the same as fringes (q.v.@:).
@item Buffer
The buffer is the basic editing unit; one buffer corresponds to one text
being edited. You can have several buffers, but at any time you are
editing only one, the `current buffer,' though several can be visible
being edited. You normally have several buffers, but at any time you are
editing only one, the `current buffer', though several can be visible
when you are using multiple windows or frames (q.v.@:). Most buffers
are visiting (q.v.@:) some file. @xref{Buffers}.
@item Buffer Selection History
Emacs keeps a buffer selection history which records how recently each
Emacs keeps a buffer selection history that records how recently each
Emacs buffer has been selected. This is used for choosing a buffer to
select. @xref{Buffers}.
......@@ -139,10 +139,10 @@ A button down event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated
right away when you press down on a mouse button. @xref{Mouse Buttons}.
@item By Default
See `default.'
See `default'.
@item Byte Compilation
See `compilation.'
See `compilation'.
@item @kbd{C-}
@kbd{C-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for Control.
......@@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ corresponding Control character. @xref{User Input,C-M-}.
@item Case Conversion
Case conversion means changing text from upper case to lower case or
vice versa. @xref{Case}, for the commands for case conversion.
vice versa. @xref{Case}.
@item Character
Characters form the contents of an Emacs buffer. Also, key sequences
......@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ Emacs supports a number of character sets, each of which represents a
particular alphabet or script. @xref{International}.
@item Character Terminal
See `text-only terminal.'
See `text-only terminal'.
@item Click Event
A click event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated when you
......@@ -195,10 +195,10 @@ binding (q.v.@:) is looked up in the relevant keymaps (q.v.@:) to find
the command to run. @xref{Commands}.
@item Command History
See `minibuffer history.'
See `minibuffer history'.
@item Command Name
A command name is the name of a Lisp symbol which is a command
A command name is the name of a Lisp symbol that is a command
(@pxref{Commands}). You can invoke any command by its name using
@kbd{M-x} (@pxref{M-x,M-x,Running Commands by Name}).
......@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ Reference Manual}) and programs in C and other languages
(@pxref{Compilation}).
@item Complete Key
A complete key is a key sequence which fully specifies one action to be
A complete key is a key sequence that fully specifies one action to be
performed by Emacs. For example, @kbd{X} and @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-x m}
are complete keys. Complete keys derive their meanings from being bound
(q.v.@:) to commands (q.v.@:). Thus, @kbd{X} is conventionally bound to
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ GNU General Public License. @xref{Copying}.
@item @key{CTRL}
The @key{CTRL} or ``control'' key is what you hold down
in order to enter a control character (q.v.). See also `@kbd{C-}.'
in order to enter a control character (q.v.). See also `@kbd{C-}'.
@item Current Buffer
The current buffer in Emacs is the Emacs buffer on which most editing
......@@ -289,7 +289,7 @@ The cursor is the rectangle on the screen which indicates the position
(called point; q.v.@:) at which insertion and deletion takes place.
The cursor is on or under the character that follows point. Often
people speak of `the cursor' when, strictly speaking, they mean
`point.' @xref{Point,Cursor}.
`point'. @xref{Point,Cursor}.
@item Customization
Customization is making minor changes in the way Emacs works, to
......@@ -299,7 +299,7 @@ or by rebinding key sequences (@pxref{Keymaps}).
@cindex cut and paste
@item Cut and Paste
See `killing' and `yanking.'
See `killing' and `yanking'.
@item Daemon
A daemon is a standard term for a system-level process that runs in the
......@@ -315,13 +315,13 @@ the default argument is used if you just type @key{RET}.
@xref{Minibuffer}.
@item Default
A default is the value that is used for a certain purpose if and when
you do not specify a value to use.
A default is the value that is used for a certain purpose when
you do not explicitly specify a value to use.
@item Default Directory
When you specify a file name that does not start with @samp{/} or @samp{~},
it is interpreted relative to the current buffer's default directory.
(On MS-Windows and MS-DOS, file names which start with a drive letter
(On MS systems, file names that start with a drive letter
@samp{@var{x}:} are treated as absolute, not relative.)
@xref{Minibuffer File,Default Directory}.
......@@ -361,11 +361,11 @@ old if you wish. @xref{Windows}.
@item Directory
File directories are named collections in the file system, within which
you can place individual files or subdirectories. They are sometimes
referred to as ``folders.'' @xref{Directories}.
referred to as ``folders''. @xref{Directories}.
@item Dired
Dired is the Emacs facility that displays the contents of a file
directory and allows you to ``edit the directory,'' performing
directory and allows you to ``edit the directory'', performing
operations on the files in the directory. @xref{Dired}.
@item Disabled Command
......@@ -421,7 +421,7 @@ variables in the environment it passes to programs it invokes.
@xref{Environment}.
@item EOL
See `end of line.'
See `end of line'.
@item Error
An error occurs when an Emacs command cannot execute in the current
......@@ -446,7 +446,7 @@ typed), you press the @key{ESC} key as you would press a letter key, and
it applies to the next character you type.
@item Expression
See `balanced expression.'
See `balanced expression'.
@item Expunging
Expunging an Rmail, Gnus newsgroup, or Dired buffer is an operation
......@@ -496,7 +496,7 @@ text to be filled. @xref{Filling}.
Filling text means adjusting the position of line-breaks to shift text
between consecutive lines, so that all the lines are approximately the
same length. @xref{Filling}. Some other editors call this feature
`line wrapping.'
`line wrapping'.
@item Font Lock
Font Lock is a mode that highlights parts of buffer text in different
......@@ -510,7 +510,7 @@ make it easy to change several fonts at once by specifying the name of a
fontset, rather than changing each font separately. @xref{Fontsets}.
@item Formfeed Character
See `page.'
See `page'.
@item Frame
A frame is a rectangular cluster of Emacs windows. Emacs starts out
......@@ -539,7 +539,7 @@ the buffer text (@pxref{Fringes}). Emacs displays the fringe using a
special face (q.v.@:) called @code{fringe}. @xref{Faces,fringe}.
@item FSF
See `Free Software Foundation.'
See `Free Software Foundation'.
@item FTP
FTP is an acronym for File Transfer Protocol. This is one standard
......@@ -551,7 +551,7 @@ correspond to any character. @xref{Function Keys}.
@item Global
Global means ``independent of the current environment; in effect
throughout Emacs.'' It is the opposite of local (q.v.@:). Particular
throughout Emacs''. It is the opposite of local (q.v.@:). Particular
examples of the use of `global' appear below.
@item Global Abbrev
......@@ -605,7 +605,7 @@ buffer.
Emacs uses highlighting in several ways. It highlights the region
whenever it is active (@pxref{Mark}). Incremental search also
highlights matches (@pxref{Incremental Search}). See also `font lock.'
highlights matches (@pxref{Incremental Search}). See also `font lock'.
@item Hardcopy
Hardcopy means printed output. Emacs has various commands for
......@@ -644,7 +644,7 @@ have. To make a character Hyper, type it while holding down the
@kbd{Hyper-} (usually written @kbd{H-} for short). @xref{User Input}.
@item Iff
``Iff'' means ``if and only if.'' This terminology comes from
``Iff'' means ``if and only if''. This terminology comes from
mathematics. Try to avoid using this term in documentation, since
many are unfamiliar with it and mistake it for a typo.
......@@ -694,14 +694,14 @@ that someone else is already editing.
@xref{Interlocking,Interlocking,Simultaneous Editing}.
@item Isearch
See `incremental search.'
See `incremental search'.
@item Justification
Justification means adding extra spaces within lines of text in order
to adjust the position of the text edges. @xref{Fill Commands}.
@item Key Binding
See `binding.'
See `binding'.
@item Keyboard Macro
Keyboard macros are a way of defining new Emacs commands from
......@@ -713,8 +713,8 @@ play them back as many times as you like.
@cindex keyboard shortcuts
@item Keyboard Shortcut
A keyboard shortcut is a key sequence (q.v.@:) which invokes a
command. What some programs call ``assigning a keyboard shortcut,''
Emacs calls ``binding a key sequence.'' See `binding.'
command. What some programs call ``assigning a keyboard shortcut'',
Emacs calls ``binding a key sequence''. See `binding'.
@item Key Sequence
A key sequence (key, for short) is a sequence of input events (q.v.@:)
......@@ -740,7 +740,7 @@ called yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Yanking}.
@item Killing
Killing means erasing text and saving it on the kill ring so it can be
yanked (q.v.@:) later. Some other systems call this ``cutting.''
yanked (q.v.@:) later. Some other systems call this ``cutting''.
Most Emacs commands that erase text perform killing, as opposed to
deletion (q.v.@:). @xref{Killing}.
......@@ -756,7 +756,7 @@ Environments}. These defaults are relevant if you edit
non-@acronym{ASCII} text (@pxref{International}).
@item Line Wrapping
See `filling.'
See `filling'.
@item Lisp
Lisp is a programming language. Most of Emacs is written in a dialect
......@@ -844,7 +844,7 @@ words you can click on with the mouse to bring up menus, or you can use
a keyboard interface to navigate it. @xref{Menu Bars}.
@item Message
See `mail.'
See `mail'.
@item Meta
Meta is the name of a modifier bit which you can use in a command
......@@ -924,13 +924,13 @@ all. @xref{Narrowing}.
@item Newline
Control-J characters in the buffer terminate lines of text and are
therefore also called newlines. See `End of Line.'
therefore also called newlines. See `End of Line'.
@cindex nil
@cindex t
@item @code{nil}
@code{nil} is a value usually interpreted as a logical ``false.'' Its
opposite is @code{t}, interpreted as ``true.''
@code{nil} is a value usually interpreted as a logical ``false''. Its
opposite is @code{t}, interpreted as ``true''.
@item Numeric Argument
A numeric argument is a number, specified before a command, to change
......@@ -965,7 +965,7 @@ character. The terminal's cursor (q.v.@:) indicates the location of
point. @xref{Point}.
@item Prefix Argument
See `numeric argument.'
See `numeric argument'.
@item Prefix Key
A prefix key is a key sequence (q.v.@:) whose sole function is to
......@@ -973,10 +973,13 @@ introduce a set of longer key sequences. @kbd{C-x} is an example of
prefix key; any two-character sequence starting with @kbd{C-x} is
therefore a legitimate key sequence. @xref{Keys}.
@c I don't think this kind of thing needs to be here.
@ignore
@item Primary Rmail File
Your primary Rmail file is the file named @samp{RMAIL} in your home
directory. That's where Rmail stores your incoming mail, unless you
specify a different file name. @xref{Rmail}.
@end ignore
@item Primary Selection
The primary selection is one particular X selection (q.v.@:); it is the
......@@ -1042,7 +1045,7 @@ correspond to changes that have been made in the text being edited.
@xref{Screen,Redisplay}.
@item Regexp
See `regular expression.'
See `regular expression'.
@item Region
The region is the text between point (q.v.@:) and the mark (q.v.@:).
......@@ -1066,10 +1069,10 @@ you have a supported method to gain access to those files.
@xref{Remote Files}.
@item Repeat Count
See `numeric argument.'
See `numeric argument'.
@item Replacement
See `global substitution.'
See `global substitution'.
@item Restriction
A buffer's restriction is the amount of text, at the beginning or the
......@@ -1086,9 +1089,13 @@ read in the minibuffer (q.v.@:). @xref{User Input,Return}.
Reverting means returning to the original state. Emacs lets you
revert a buffer by re-reading its file from disk. @xref{Reverting}.
@c Seems too obvious, also there is nothing special about the format
@c these days.
@ignore
@item Rmail File
An Rmail file is a file containing text in the format used by
Rmail for storing mail. @xref{Rmail}.
@end ignore
@item Saving
Saving a buffer means copying its text into the file that was visited
......@@ -1198,10 +1205,10 @@ inside the string; however, backslash sequences as in C, such as
allowed as well.
@item String Substitution
See `global substitution.'
See `global substitution'.
@item Syntax Highlighting
See `font lock.'
See `font lock'.
@item Syntax Table
The syntax table tells Emacs which characters are part of a word,
......@@ -1287,11 +1294,11 @@ two adjacent characters, words, balanced expressions (q.v.@:) or lines
@item Truncation
Truncating text lines in the display means leaving out any text on a
line that does not fit within the right margin of the window
displaying it. See also `continuation line.'
displaying it. See also `continuation line'.
@xref{Continuation Lines,Truncation}.
@item TTY
See `text-only terminal.'
See `text-only terminal'.
@item Undoing
Undoing means making your previous editing go in reverse, bringing
......@@ -1350,7 +1357,7 @@ have their] own windows at the same time. All modern operating systems
include a window system.
@item Word Abbrev
See `abbrev.'
See `abbrev'.
@item Word Search
Word search is searching for a sequence of words, considering the
......@@ -1359,5 +1366,5 @@ punctuation between them as insignificant. @xref{Word Search}.
@item Yanking
Yanking means reinserting text previously killed (q.v.@:). It can be
used to undo a mistaken kill, or for copying or moving text. Some
other systems call this ``pasting.'' @xref{Yanking}.
other systems call this ``pasting''. @xref{Yanking}.
@end table
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