Commit 8e375db2 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Delete find-file-text and find-file-binary.

Misc cleanups.
parent df9d7630
......@@ -105,19 +105,17 @@ supported.
@cindex mouse, set number of buttons
@findex msdos-set-mouse-buttons
Some versions of mouse drivers don't report the number of mouse
buttons correctly. For example, mice with a wheel report that they have
3 buttons, but only 2 of them are passed to Emacs; the clicks on the
wheel, which serves as the middle button, are not passed. In these
cases, you can use the @kbd{M-x msdos-set-mouse-buttons} command to set
the notion of number of buttons used by Emacs. This command prompts for
the number of buttons, and forces Emacs to behave as if your mouse had
that number of buttons. You could make such a setting permanent by
adding this fragment to your @file{_emacs} init file:
buttons correctly. For example, mice with a wheel report that they
have 3 buttons, but only 2 of them are passed to Emacs; the clicks on
the wheel, which serves as the middle button, are not passed. In
these cases, you can use the @kbd{M-x msdos-set-mouse-buttons} command
to tell Emacs how many mouse buttons to expect. You could make such a
setting permanent by adding this fragment to your @file{_emacs} init
file:
@example
;; Force Emacs to behave as if the mouse had
;; only 2 buttons
(msdos-set-mouse-buttons 2)
;; @r{Treat the mouse like a 2-button mouse.}
(msdos-set-mouse-buttons 2)
@end example
@cindex Windows clipboard support
......@@ -167,15 +165,15 @@ native font built into the DOS display.
@cindex cursor shape on MS-DOS
When Emacs starts, it changes the cursor shape to a solid box. This
is for compatibility with the Unix version, where the box cursor is the
default. This default shape can be changed to a bar by specifying the
@code{cursor-type} parameter in the variable @code{default-frame-alist}
(@pxref{Creating Frames}). The MS-DOS terminal doesn't support a
vertical-bar cursor, so the bar cursor is horizontal, and the
@code{@var{width}} parameter, if specified by the frame parameters,
actually determines its height. As an extension, the bar cursor
specification can include the starting scan line of the cursor as well
as its width, like this:
is for compatibility with other systems, where the box cursor is the
default in Emacs. This default shape can be changed to a bar by
specifying the @code{cursor-type} parameter in the variable
@code{default-frame-alist} (@pxref{Creating Frames}). The MS-DOS
terminal doesn't support a vertical-bar cursor, so the bar cursor is
horizontal, and the @code{@var{width}} parameter, if specified by the
frame parameters, actually determines its height. As an extension,
the bar cursor specification can include the starting scan line of the
cursor as well as its width, like this:
@example
'(cursor-type bar @var{width} . @var{start})
......@@ -186,12 +184,12 @@ In addition, if the @var{width} parameter is negative, the cursor bar
begins at the top of the character cell.
@cindex frames on MS-DOS
Multiple frames (@pxref{Frames}) are supported on MS-DOS, but they all
overlap, so you only see a single frame at any given moment. That
single visible frame occupies the entire screen. When you run Emacs
from MS-Windows DOS box, you can make the visible frame smaller than
the full screen, but Emacs still cannot display more than a single
frame at a time.
The MS-DOS terminal can only display a single frame at a time. The
Emacs frame facilities work on MS-DOS much as they do on text-only
terminals (@pxref{Frames}). When you run Emacs from a DOS window on
MS-Windows, you can make the visible frame smaller than the full
screen, but Emacs still cannot display more than a single frame at a
time.
@cindex frame size under MS-DOS
@findex mode4350
......@@ -287,9 +285,9 @@ environment variable. That is, if your Emacs binary,
Emacs acts as if @env{HOME} were set to @samp{c:/utils/emacs}. In
particular, that is where Emacs looks for the init file @file{_emacs}.
With this in mind, you can use @samp{~} in file names as an alias for
the home directory, as you would in Unix. You can also set @env{HOME}
variable in the environment before starting Emacs; its value will then
override the above default behavior.
the home directory, as you would on GNU or Unix. You can also set
@env{HOME} variable in the environment before starting Emacs; its
value will then override the above default behavior.
Emacs on MS-DOS handles the directory name @file{/dev} specially,
because of a feature in the emulator libraries of DJGPP that pretends
......@@ -301,8 +299,7 @@ using an actual directory named @file{/dev} on any disk.
@cindex text and binary files on MS-DOS/MS-Windows
GNU Emacs uses newline characters to separate text lines. This is the
convention used on Unix, on which GNU Emacs was developed, and on GNU
systems since they are modeled on Unix.
convention used on GNU and Unix.
@cindex end-of-line conversion on MS-DOS/MS-Windows
MS-DOS and MS-Windows normally use carriage-return linefeed, a
......@@ -323,9 +320,10 @@ not agree with the file size information known to the operating system.
In addition, if Emacs recognizes from a file's contents that it uses
newline rather than carriage-return linefeed as its line separator, it
does not perform EOL conversion when reading or writing that file. Thus,
you can read and edit files from Unix or GNU systems on MS-DOS with no
special effort, and they will be left with their Unix-style EOLs.
does not perform EOL conversion when reading or writing that file.
Thus, you can read and edit files from GNU and Unix systems on MS-DOS
with no special effort, and they will retain their Unix-style
end-of-line convention after you edit them.
The mode line indicates whether end-of-line translation was used for
the current buffer. If MS-DOS end-of-line translation is in use for the
......@@ -336,25 +334,22 @@ instead of the backslash, to alert you that the file's EOL format is not
the usual carriage-return linefeed.
@cindex DOS-to-Unix conversion of files
@pindex dos2unix
End-of-line conversion is part of the general coding system conversion
mechanism, so the way to control whether to treat a text file as
DOS-style or Unix-style is with the commands for specifying a coding
system (@pxref{Specify Coding}). For example, @kbd{C-x @key{RET} c unix
@key{RET} C-x C-f foobar.txt} visits the file @file{foobar.txt} without
converting the EOLs; if that file has carriage-return linefeed pairs at
the end of its lines, Emacs will display @samp{^M} at the end of each
line. Similarly, you can force Emacs to save a buffer with specific EOL
format with the @kbd{C-x @key{RET} f} command. For example, to save a
buffer with Unix EOL format, type @kbd{C-x @key{RET} f unix @key{RET}
C-x C-s}. Thus, visiting a file with DOS EOL conversion, then saving it
with Unix EOL format effectively converts the file to Unix text style,
like the popular program @code{dos2unix} does.
To visit a file and specify whether it uses DOS-style or Unix-style
end-of-line, specify a coding system (@pxref{Specify Coding}). For
example, @kbd{C-x @key{RET} c unix @key{RET} C-x C-f foobar.txt}
visits the file @file{foobar.txt} without converting the EOLs; if some
line ends with a carriage-return linefeed pair, Emacs will display
@samp{^M} at the end of that line. Similarly, you can direct Emacs to
save a buffer in a specified EOL format with the @kbd{C-x @key{RET} f}
command. For example, to save a buffer with Unix EOL format, type
@kbd{C-x @key{RET} f unix @key{RET} C-x C-s}. If you visit a file
with DOS EOL conversion, then save it with Unix EOL format, that
effectively converts the file to Unix EOL style, like @code{dos2unix}.
@cindex untranslated file system
@findex add-untranslated-filesystem
When you use NFS or Samba to access file systems that reside on
computers using Unix or GNU systems, Emacs should not perform
computers using GNU or Unix systems, Emacs should not perform
end-of-line translation on any files in these file systems--not even
when you create a new file. To request this, designate these file
systems as @dfn{untranslated} file systems by calling the function
......@@ -387,10 +382,10 @@ the function @code{remove-untranslated-filesystem}. This function takes
one argument, which should be a string just like the one that was used
previously with @code{add-untranslated-filesystem}.
Designating a file system as untranslated does @strong{not} disable
code conversions as specified by the coding systems set up by your
language environment, it only affects the EOL conversions, by forcing
Emacs to create new files with Unix-style newline-only EOLs.
Designating a file system as untranslated does not affect character
set conversion, only end-of-line conversion. Essentially, it directs
Emacs to create new files with the Unix-style convention of using
newline at the end of a line. @xref{Coding Systems}.
@vindex file-name-buffer-file-type-alist
@cindex binary files, on MS-DOS/MS-Windows
......@@ -415,33 +410,16 @@ always writes those files with DOS-style EOLs.
the file-name patterns in @code{file-name-buffer-file-type-alist}, the
EOL conversion is determined by @code{file-name-buffer-file-type-alist}.
@findex find-file-text
@findex find-file-binary
You can visit a file and specify whether to treat it as text or binary
using the commands @code{find-file-text} and @code{find-file-binary}.
@code{find-file-text} specifies DOS EOL conversions, but leaves the
other coding conversions unspecified (Emacs determines the required
conversions via the usual defaults and coding-detection mechanisms). On
the other hand, @code{find-file-binary} turns off @emph{all}
coding-system conversions.
@findex find-file-literally@r{, and binary files}
The @code{find-file-text} and @code{find-file-binary} commands are
only available when Emacs runs on MS-DOS or MS-Windows. The command
@code{find-file-literally}, which is available on all platforms,
produces the same effect as @code{find-file-binary}.
@node MS-DOS Printing
@section Printing and MS-DOS
Printing commands, such as @code{lpr-buffer} (@pxref{Hardcopy}) and
@code{ps-print-buffer} (@pxref{PostScript}) can work in MS-DOS and
MS-Windows by sending the output to one of the printer ports, if a
Unix-style @code{lpr} program is unavailable. This behaviour is
controlled by the same variables that control printing with @code{lpr}
on Unix (@pxref{Hardcopy}, @pxref{PostScript Variables}), but the
defaults for these variables on MS-DOS and MS-Windows are not the same
as the defaults on Unix.
Unix-style @code{lpr} program is unavailable. The same Emacs
variables control printing on all systems (@pxref{Hardcopy}), but in
some cases they have different default values on MS-DOS and
MS-Windows.
@vindex printer-name @r{(MS-DOS)}
If you want to use your local printer, printing on it in the usual DOS
......@@ -703,7 +681,7 @@ when you want to use it (@pxref{Specify Coding}).
a DOS codepage, using Emacs running on some other operating system.
@cindex MS-Windows codepages
MS-Windows features its own codepages, which are different from the
MS-Windows provides its own codepages, which are different from the
DOS codepages for the same locale. For example, DOS codepage 850
supports the same character set as Windows codepage 1252; DOS codepage
855 supports the same character set as Windows codepage 1251, etc.
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment