Commit 8edb942b authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Doc and manual fixes related to mule

* doc/emacs/mule.texi (International): Copyedits.
(International Chars): Update C-x = example output.
(Disabling Multibyte): Rename from "Enabling Multibyte".
Clarify what "unibyte: t" does, and mode-line description.
(Unibyte Mode): Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
Use Texinfo recommended convention for quotes+punctuation.

* doc/emacs/custom.texi (Specifying File Variables):
Fix "unibyte" description.
Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.

* doc/emacs/emacs.texi: Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.

* doc/lispref/loading.texi (Loading Non-ASCII):
"unibyte:" can also be at the end.

* lisp/international/mule.el (set-auto-coding-for-load): Doc fix.
parent dc2ab667
2012-04-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (International): Copyedits.
(International Chars): Update C-x = example output.
(Disabling Multibyte): Rename from "Enabling Multibyte".
Clarify what "unibyte: t" does, and mode-line description.
(Unibyte Mode): Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
Use Texinfo recommended convention for quotes+punctuation.
* custom.texi (Specifying File Variables): Fix "unibyte" description.
Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
* emacs.texi: Update for "Disabling Multibyte" node name change.
2012-04-10 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* abbrevs.texi, arevert-xtra.texi, buffers.texi, building.texi:
......
......@@ -1163,8 +1163,8 @@ returned by that expression is ignored).
conversion of this file. @xref{Coding Systems}.
@item
@code{unibyte} says to visit the file in a unibyte buffer, if the
value is @code{t}. @xref{Enabling Multibyte}.
@code{unibyte} says to load or compile a file of Emacs Lisp in unibyte
mode, if the value is @code{t}. @xref{Disabling Multibyte}.
@end itemize
@noindent
......
......@@ -516,7 +516,7 @@ Frames and Graphical Displays
International Character Set Support
* International Chars:: Basic concepts of multibyte characters.
* Enabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Disabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Language Environments:: Setting things up for the language you use.
* Input Methods:: Entering text characters not on your keyboard.
* Select Input Method:: Specifying your choice of input methods.
......
......@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ including European and Vietnamese variants of the Latin alphabet, as
well as Cyrillic, Devanagari (for Hindi and Marathi), Ethiopic, Greek,
Han (for Chinese and Japanese), Hangul (for Korean), Hebrew, IPA,
Kannada, Lao, Malayalam, Tamil, Thai, Tibetan, and Vietnamese scripts.
Emacs also supports various encodings of these characters used by
Emacs also supports various encodings of these characters that are used by
other internationalized software, such as word processors and mailers.
Emacs allows editing text with international characters by supporting
......@@ -74,14 +74,14 @@ others.
@item
You can insert non-@acronym{ASCII} characters or search for them. To do that,
you can specify an input method (@pxref{Select Input Method}) suitable
for your language, or use the default input method set up when you set
for your language, or use the default input method set up when you chose
your language environment. If
your keyboard can produce non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, you can select an
appropriate keyboard coding system (@pxref{Terminal Coding}), and Emacs
will accept those characters. Latin-1 characters can also be input by
using the @kbd{C-x 8} prefix, see @ref{Unibyte Mode}.
On the X Window System, your locale should be set to an appropriate
With the X Window System, your locale should be set to an appropriate
value to make sure Emacs interprets keyboard input correctly; see
@ref{Language Environments, locales}.
@end itemize
......@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ value to make sure Emacs interprets keyboard input correctly; see
@menu
* International Chars:: Basic concepts of multibyte characters.
* Enabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Disabling Multibyte:: Controlling whether to use multibyte characters.
* Language Environments:: Setting things up for the language you use.
* Input Methods:: Entering text characters not on your keyboard.
* Select Input Method:: Specifying your choice of input methods.
......@@ -224,29 +224,30 @@ faces used to display the character, and any overlays containing it
in a buffer whose coding system is @code{utf-8-unix}:
@smallexample
character: @`A (192, #o300, #xc0)
preferred charset: unicode (Unicode (ISO10646))
code point: 0xC0
syntax: w which means: word
category: j:Japanese l:Latin v:Vietnamese
buffer code: #xC3 #x80
file code: not encodable by coding system undecided-unix
display: by this font (glyph code)
position: 1 of 1 (0%), column: 0
character: @`A (displayed as @`A) (codepoint 192, #o300, #xc0)
preferred charset: unicode (Unicode (ISO10646))
code point in charset: 0xC0
syntax: w which means: word
category: .:Base, L:Left-to-right (strong),
j:Japanese, l:Latin, v:Viet
buffer code: #xC3 #x80
file code: not encodable by coding system undecided-unix
display: by this font (glyph code)
xft:-unknown-DejaVu Sans Mono-normal-normal-
normal-*-13-*-*-*-m-0-iso10646-1 (#x82)
Character code properties: customize what to show
name: LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A WITH GRAVE
old-name: LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A GRAVE
general-category: Lu (Letter, Uppercase)
decomposition: (65 768) ('A' '`')
old-name: LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A GRAVE
There are text properties here:
auto-composed t
@end smallexample
@node Enabling Multibyte
@section Enabling Multibyte Characters
@c FIXME? Does this section even belong in the user manual?
@c Seems more appropriate to the lispref?
@node Disabling Multibyte
@section Disabling Multibyte Characters
By default, Emacs starts in multibyte mode: it stores the contents
of buffers and strings using an internal encoding that represents
......@@ -275,32 +276,48 @@ Coding}. Unlike @code{find-file-literally}, finding a file as
@samp{raw-text} doesn't disable format conversion, uncompression, or
auto mode selection.
@c Not a single file in Emacs uses this feature. Is it really worth
@c mentioning in the _user_ manual? Also, this duplicates somewhat
@c "Loading Non-ASCII" from the lispref.
@cindex Lisp files, and multibyte operation
@cindex multibyte operation, and Lisp files
@cindex unibyte operation, and Lisp files
@cindex init file, and non-@acronym{ASCII} characters
Emacs normally loads Lisp files as multibyte.
This includes the Emacs initialization
file, @file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of Emacs packages
file, @file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of packages
such as Gnus. However, you can specify unibyte loading for a
particular Lisp file, by putting @w{@samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-}} in a
comment on the first line (@pxref{File Variables}). Then that file is
always loaded as unibyte text. The motivation for these conventions
is that it is more reliable to always load any particular Lisp file in
the same way. However, you can load a Lisp file as unibyte, on any
one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x @key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}}
immediately before loading it.
The mode line indicates whether multibyte character support is
enabled in the current buffer. If it is, there are two or more
characters (most often two dashes) near the beginning of the mode
line, before the indication of the visited file's end-of-line
convention (colon, backslash, etc.). When multibyte characters
are not enabled, nothing precedes the colon except a single dash.
@xref{Mode Line}, for more details about this.
particular Lisp file, by adding an entry @samp{unibyte: t} in a file
local variables section (@pxref{File Variables}). Then that file is
always loaded as unibyte text. Note that this does not represent a
real @code{unibyte} variable, rather it just acts as an indicator
to Emacs in the same way as @code{coding} does (@pxref{Specify Coding}).
@ignore
@c I don't see the point of this statement:
The motivation for these conventions is that it is more reliable to
always load any particular Lisp file in the same way.
@end ignore
Note also that this feature only applies to @emph{loading} Lisp files
for evaluation, not to visiting them for editing. You can also load a
Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before loading it.
@c See http://debbugs.gnu.org/11226 for lack of unibyte tooltip.
@vindex enable-multibyte-characters
The buffer-local variable @code{enable-multibyte-characters} is
non-@code{nil} in multibyte buffers, and @code{nil} in unibyte ones.
The mode line also indicates whether a buffer is multibyte or not.
@xref{Mode Line}. With a graphical display, in a multibyte buffer,
the portion of the mode line that indicates the character set has a
tooltip that (amongst other things) says that the buffer is multibyte.
In a unibyte buffer, the character set indicator is absent. Thus, in
a unibyte buffer (when using a graphical display) there is normally
nothing before the indication of the visited file's end-of-line
convention (colon, backslash, etc.), unless you are using an input
method.
@findex toggle-enable-multibyte-characters
You can turn on multibyte support in a specific buffer by invoking the
You can turn off multibyte support in a specific buffer by invoking the
command @code{toggle-enable-multibyte-characters} in that buffer.
@node Language Environments
......@@ -1540,7 +1557,7 @@ can still handle these character codes as if they belonged to
set-language-environment} and specify a suitable language environment
such as @samp{Latin-@var{n}}.
For more information about unibyte operation, see @ref{Enabling
For more information about unibyte operation, see @ref{Disabling
Multibyte}. Note particularly that you probably want to ensure that
your initialization files are read as unibyte if they contain
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters.
......@@ -1613,7 +1630,7 @@ a key sequence is allowed.
library is loaded, the @key{ALT} modifier key, if the keyboard has
one, serves the same purpose as @kbd{C-x 8}: use @key{ALT} together
with an accent character to modify the following letter. In addition,
if the keyboard has keys for the Latin-1 ``dead accent characters,''
if the keyboard has keys for the Latin-1 ``dead accent characters'',
they too are defined to compose with the following character, once
@code{iso-transl} is loaded.
......
2012-04-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* loading.texi (Loading Non-ASCII): "unibyte:" can also be at the end.
2012-04-10 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* strings.texi (Case Tables):
......
......@@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ strings are multibyte strings should not be noticeable, since
inserting them in unibyte buffers converts them to unibyte
automatically. However, if this does make a difference, you can force
a particular Lisp file to be interpreted as unibyte by writing
@samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-} in a comment on the file's first line. With
@samp{unibyte: t} in a local variables section. With
that designator, the file will unconditionally be interpreted as
unibyte, even in an ordinary multibyte Emacs session. This can matter
when making keybindings to non-@acronym{ASCII} characters written as
......
2012-04-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* international/mule.el (set-auto-coding-for-load): Doc fix.
2012-04-11 Stefan Monnier <monnier@iro.umontreal.ca>
* imenu.el (imenu-add-to-menubar): `current-local-map' can be nil.
......
......@@ -1754,8 +1754,9 @@ functions, so they won't be called at all."
:type '(repeat function))
(defvar set-auto-coding-for-load nil
"Non-nil means look for `load-coding' property instead of `coding'.
This is used for loading and byte-compiling Emacs Lisp files.")
"Non-nil means respect a \"unibyte: t\" entry in file local variables.
Emacs binds this variable to t when loading or byte-compiling Emacs Lisp
files.")
(defun auto-coding-alist-lookup (filename)
"Return the coding system specified by `auto-coding-alist' for FILENAME."
......
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