Commit 8f4042d2 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
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Read msdog.texi

* doc/emacs/msdog.texi (Text and Binary, ls in Lisp, Windows HOME)
(Windows Keyboard, Windows Mouse, Windows Processes)
(Windows Printing, Windows Misc): Copyedits.
(ls in Lisp): Update switches list.
* admin/FOR-RELEASE: Related markup.
parent b291b572
......@@ -154,7 +154,12 @@ mark.texi cyd
mini.texi
misc.texi cyd
modes.texi cyd
msdog.texi
msdog.texi rgm (can't actually test any of it though)
It was not obvious to me that the following is true (it could well be though):
Emacs on Windows automatically determines your default printer and
sets the variable `printer-name' to that printer's name.
msdog-xtra.texi rgm (can't actually test any of it though)
mule.texi
m-x.texi cyd
......
2012-02-23 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* msdog.texi (Text and Binary, ls in Lisp, Windows HOME)
(Windows Keyboard, Windows Mouse, Windows Processes)
(Windows Printing, Windows Misc): Copyedits.
(ls in Lisp): Update switches list.
* msdog-xtra.texi (MS-DOS Display): Update list-colors-display xref.
Update dos-mode* function names.
(MS-DOS Printing, MS-DOS and MULE): Copyedits.
......
......@@ -159,7 +159,8 @@ save a buffer in a specified EOL format with the @kbd{C-x @key{RET} f}
command. For example, to save a buffer with Unix EOL format, type
@kbd{C-x @key{RET} f unix @key{RET} C-x C-s}. If you visit a file
with DOS EOL conversion, then save it with Unix EOL format, that
effectively converts the file to Unix EOL style, like @code{dos2unix}.
effectively converts the file to Unix EOL style, like the
@code{dos2unix} program.
@cindex untranslated file system
@findex add-untranslated-filesystem
......@@ -221,7 +222,7 @@ for files which are known to be Windows-style text files with
carriage-return linefeed EOL format, such as @file{CONFIG.SYS}; Emacs
always writes those files with Windows-style EOLs.
If a file which belongs to an untranslated file system matches one of
If a file that belongs to an untranslated file system matches one of
the file-name patterns in @code{file-name-buffer-file-type-alist}, the
EOL conversion is determined by @code{file-name-buffer-file-type-alist}.
......@@ -263,8 +264,8 @@ FAT32, and XFAT volumes.
@cindex Dired, and MS-Windows/MS-DOS
@cindex @code{ls} emulation
Dired normally uses the external program @code{ls} (or its close
work-alike) to produce the directory listing displayed in Dired
Dired normally uses the external program @code{ls}
to produce the directory listing displayed in Dired
buffers (@pxref{Dired}). However, MS-Windows and MS-DOS systems don't
come with such a program, although several ports of @sc{gnu} @code{ls}
are available. Therefore, Emacs on those systems @emph{emulates}
......@@ -281,8 +282,8 @@ they are described in this section.
The @code{ls} emulation supports many of the @code{ls} switches, but
it doesn't support all of them. Here's the list of the switches it
does support: @option{-A}, @option{-a}, @option{-B}, @option{-C},
@option{-c}, @option{-i}, @option{-G}, @option{-g}, @option{-R},
@option{-r}, @option{-S}, @option{-s}, @option{-t}, @option{-U},
@option{-c}, @option{-G}, @option{-g}, @option{-h}, @option{-i}, @option{-n},
@option{-R}, @option{-r}, @option{-S}, @option{-s}, @option{-t}, @option{-U},
@option{-u}, and @option{-X}. The @option{-F} switch is partially
supported (it appends the character that classifies the file, but does
not prevent symlink following).
......@@ -413,9 +414,9 @@ value of @code{HOME}.
You can override this default value of @code{HOME} by explicitly
setting the environment variable @env{HOME} to point to any directory
on your system. @env{HOME} can be set either from the command shell
prompt or from the @samp{My Computer}s @samp{Properties} dialog.
@code{HOME} can also be set in the system registry, for details see
@ref{MS-Windows Registry}.
prompt or from @samp{Properties} dialog of @samp{My Computer}.
@code{HOME} can also be set in the system registry,
@pxref{MS-Windows Registry}.
For compatibility with older versions of Emacs@footnote{
Older versions of Emacs didn't check the application data directory.
......@@ -431,9 +432,9 @@ deprecated.
Whatever the final place is, Emacs sets the internal value of the
@env{HOME} environment variable to point to it, and it will use that
location for other files and directories it normally looks for or
creates in the user's home directory.
creates in your home directory.
You can always find out where Emacs thinks is your home directory's
You can always find out what Emacs thinks is your home directory's
location by typing @kbd{C-x d ~/ @key{RET}}. This should present the
list of files in the home directory, and show its full name on the
first line. Likewise, to visit your init file, type @kbd{C-x C-f
......@@ -510,7 +511,7 @@ otherwise it returns @code{nil}.
@cindex @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} vs @kbd{Alt-@key{TAB}} (MS-Windows)
@cindex @kbd{Alt-@key{TAB}} vs @kbd{M-@key{TAB}} (MS-Windows)
For example, @code{(w32-register-hot-key [M-tab])} lets you use
@kbd{M-TAB} normally in Emacs, for instance, to complete the word or
@kbd{M-TAB} normally in Emacs; for instance, to complete the word or
symbol at point at top level, or to complete the current search string
against previously sought strings during incremental search.
......@@ -589,7 +590,7 @@ of these variables. Passing each of these keys to Windows produces
its normal effect: for example, @kbd{@key{Lwindow}} opens the
@code{Start} menu, etc.@footnote{
Some combinations of the ``Windows'' keys with other keys are caught
by Windows at low level in a way that Emacs currently cannot prevent.
by Windows at a low level in a way that Emacs currently cannot prevent.
For example, @kbd{@key{Lwindow} r} always pops up the Windows
@samp{Run} dialog. Customizing the value of
@code{w32-phantom-key-code} might help in some cases, though.}
......@@ -612,7 +613,7 @@ modifiers.
@cindex mouse, and MS-Windows
This section describes the Windows-specific variables related to
mouse.
the mouse.
@vindex w32-mouse-button-tolerance
@cindex simulation of middle mouse button
......@@ -689,8 +690,8 @@ to do its job.
@vindex w32-quote-process-args
The variable @code{w32-quote-process-args} controls how Emacs quotes
the process arguments. Non-@code{nil} means quote with the @code{"}
character. If the value is a character, use that character to escape
any quote characters that appear; otherwise chose a suitable escape
character. If the value is a character, Emacs uses that character to escape
any quote characters that appear; otherwise it chooses a suitable escape
character based on the type of the program.
@ifnottex
......@@ -723,7 +724,7 @@ tell Emacs which printer to use.
If you want to use your local printer, then set the Lisp variable
@code{lpr-command} to @code{""} (its default value on Windows) and
@code{printer-name} to the name of the printer port---for example,
@code{"PRN"}, the usual local printer port or @code{"LPT2"}, or
@code{"PRN"}, the usual local printer port, or @code{"LPT2"}, or
@code{"COM1"} for a serial printer. You can also set
@code{printer-name} to a file name, in which case ``printed'' output
is actually appended to that file. If you set @code{printer-name} to
......@@ -738,7 +739,7 @@ printers, run the command @samp{net view} from the command prompt to
obtain a list of servers, and @samp{net view @var{server-name}} to see
the names of printers (and directories) shared by that server.
Alternatively, click the @samp{Network Neighborhood} icon on your
desktop, and look for machines which share their printers via the
desktop, and look for machines that share their printers via the
network.
@cindex @samp{net use}, and printing on MS-Windows
......@@ -797,8 +798,8 @@ specified by @code{printer-name}.
Finally, if you do have an @code{lpr} work-alike, you can set the
variable @code{lpr-command} to @code{"lpr"}. Then Emacs will use
@code{lpr} for printing, as on other systems. (If the name of the
program isn't @code{lpr}, set @code{lpr-command} to specify where to
find it.) The variable @code{lpr-switches} has its standard meaning
program isn't @code{lpr}, set @code{lpr-command} to the appropriate value.)
The variable @code{lpr-switches} has its standard meaning
when @code{lpr-command} is not @code{""}. If the variable
@code{printer-name} has a string value, it is used as the value for the
@code{-P} option to @code{lpr}, as on Unix.
......@@ -822,7 +823,7 @@ ports, and only one of them is a PostScript printer.)
@cindex Ghostscript, use for PostScript printing
The default value of the variable @code{ps-lpr-command} is @code{""},
which causes PostScript output to be sent to the printer port specified
by @code{ps-printer-name}, but @code{ps-lpr-command} can also be set to
by @code{ps-printer-name}; but @code{ps-lpr-command} can also be set to
the name of a program which will accept PostScript files. Thus, if you
have a non-PostScript printer, you can set this variable to the name of
a PostScript interpreter program (such as Ghostscript). Any switches
......@@ -980,7 +981,7 @@ the system default antialiasing.
determines whether to make the system caret visible. The default when
no screen reader software is in use is @code{nil}, which means Emacs
draws its own cursor to indicate the position of point. A
non-@code{nil} value means Emacs will indicate point location by the
non-@code{nil} value means Emacs will indicate point location with the
system caret; this facilitates use of screen reader software, and is
the default when such software is detected when running Emacs.
When this variable is non-@code{nil}, other variables affecting the
......
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