Commit 8f6293ca authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Fix use of @key in Texinfo manuals

* doc/misc/efaq-w32.texi (Location of init file):
* doc/misc/org.texi (Editing source code, Export settings)
(Closing items, Drawers, Structure editing):
* doc/misc/gnus.texi (Spam and Ham Processors, Terminology):
* doc/misc/calc.texi (Keypad Functions Menu, Keypad Binary Menu)
(Keypad Vectors Menu, Keypad Main Menu, Basic Arithmetic)
(Symbolic Mode):
* doc/misc/sc.texi (Electric References):
* doc/misc/info.texi (Help-^L):
* doc/misc/reftex.texi (Reference Styles):
* doc/misc/idlwave.texi (Troubleshooting, Examining Variables)
(Lesson III---User Catalog, Using the Shell):
* doc/misc/eshell.texi (Bugs and ideas):
* doc/misc/ada-mode.texi (Automatic Casing):
* doc/misc/ediff.texi (Selective Browsing):
* doc/misc/vip.texi (Customizing Constants):
* doc/misc/pcl-cvs.texi (Selected files):
* doc/misc/efaq.texi (Replying to the sender of a message)
(Basic keys, No Meta key, Matching parentheses)
(Origin of the term Emacs, Installing Texinfo documentation)
(Learning how to do something, Emacs manual, Extended commands):
* doc/misc/viper.texi (Rudimentary Changes):
* doc/misc/tramp.texi (Frequently Asked Questions):
* doc/emacs/kmacro.texi (Basic Keyboard Macro):
* doc/emacs/frames.texi (Frame Commands):
* doc/emacs/msdos.texi (Windows Keyboard):
* doc/emacs/search.texi (Query Replace):
* doc/lispintro/emacs-lisp-intro.texi (Keybindings)
(Note for Novices):
* doc/lispref/tips.texi (Key Binding Conventions): Fix use of
@key.  For the details, see
http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/emacs-devel/2018-04/msg00390.html.
parent f4c98942
......@@ -485,7 +485,7 @@ Delete all frames on the current terminal, except the selected one.
Toggle the maximization state of the current frame. When a frame is
maximized, it fills the screen.
@item @key{F11>}
@item @key{F11}
@kindex F11
@findex toggle-frame-fullscreen
Toggle full-screen mode for the current frame. (The difference
......
......@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ definition, type @kbd{C-x )} (@code{kmacro-end-macro}). To execute
the most recent macro, type @kbd{C-x e}
(@code{kmacro-end-and-call-macro}). If you enter @kbd{C-x e} while
defining a macro, the macro is terminated and executed immediately.
Immediately after typing @kbd{C-x e}, you can type @key{e} repeatedly
Immediately after typing @kbd{C-x e}, you can type @kbd{e} repeatedly
to immediately repeat the macro one or more times. You can also give
@kbd{C-x e} a repeat argument, just like @key{F4} (when it is used to
execute a macro).
......
......@@ -597,7 +597,7 @@ search string against previously sought strings during incremental
search. @code{(w32-register-hot-key [s-])} with
@code{w32-lwindow-modifier} bound to @code{super} disables all the
Windows' own Windows key based shortcuts.@footnote{There is one known
exception: The combination @kbd{@key{Windows}-@key{L}} that locks the
exception: The combination @kbd{@key{Windows}-L} that locks the
workstation is handled by the system on a lower level. For this
reason, @code{w32-register-hot-key} cannot override this key
combination - it always locks the computer.}
......@@ -607,9 +607,9 @@ combination - it always locks the computer.}
call. Thus, you can set @code{w32-lwindow-modifier} as @code{super},
then call @code{(w32-register-hot-key [s-r])}, and finally set
@code{w32-rwindow-modifier} as @code{super} as well. The result is
that the left Windows key together with @key{R} invokes whichever
that the left Windows key together with @kbd{R} invokes whichever
function you have bound for the combination in Emacs, and the right
Windows key and @key{R} opens the Windows @code{Run} dialog.
Windows key and @kbd{R} opens the Windows @code{Run} dialog.
The hotkey registrations always also include all the shift and
control modifier combinations for the given hotkey; that is,
......
......@@ -1654,7 +1654,7 @@ specify what to do with this occurrence.
@item Y @r{(Upper-case)}
to replace all remaining occurrences in all remaining buffers in
multi-buffer replacements (like the Dired @key{Q} command that performs
multi-buffer replacements (like the Dired @kbd{Q} command that performs
query replace on selected files). It answers this question and all
subsequent questions in the series with ``yes'', without further
user interaction.
......
......@@ -914,17 +914,17 @@ the command in parentheses, like this: @kbd{M-C-\}
@kbd{M-C-\}. (You can, if you wish, change the keys that are typed to
invoke the command; this is called @dfn{rebinding}. @xref{Keymaps, ,
Keymaps}.) The abbreviation @kbd{M-C-\} means that you type your
@key{META} key, @key{CTRL} key and @key{\} key all at the same time.
@key{META} key, @key{CTRL} key and @kbd{\} key all at the same time.
(On many modern keyboards the @key{META} key is labeled
@key{ALT}.)
Sometimes a combination like this is called a keychord, since it is
similar to the way you play a chord on a piano. If your keyboard does
not have a @key{META} key, the @key{ESC} key prefix is used in place
of it. In this case, @kbd{M-C-\} means that you press and release your
@key{ESC} key and then type the @key{CTRL} key and the @key{\} key at
@key{ESC} key and then type the @key{CTRL} key and the @kbd{\} key at
the same time. But usually @kbd{M-C-\} means press the @key{CTRL} key
along with the key that is labeled @key{ALT} and, at the same time,
press the @key{\} key.
press the @kbd{\} key.
In addition to typing a lone keychord, you can prefix what you type
with @kbd{C-u}, which is called the @dfn{universal argument}. The
......@@ -17109,8 +17109,8 @@ This also shows how to set a key globally, for all modes.
The command is @code{global-set-key}. It is followed by the
keybinding. In a @file{.emacs} file, the keybinding is written as
shown: @code{\C-c} stands for Control-C, which means to press the
control key and the @key{c} key at the same time. The @code{w} means
to press the @key{w} key. The keybinding is surrounded by double
control key and the @kbd{c} key at the same time. The @code{w} means
to press the @kbd{w} key. The keybinding is surrounded by double
quotation marks. In documentation, you would write this as
@w{@kbd{C-c w}}. (If you were binding a @key{META} key, such as
@kbd{M-c}, rather than a @key{CTRL} key, you would write
......
......@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ any context prevents recognition of escape sequences as function keys in
that context.
@item
Similarly, don't bind a key sequence ending in @key{C-g}, since that
Similarly, don't bind a key sequence ending in @kbd{C-g}, since that
is commonly used to cancel a key sequence.
@item
......
......@@ -1356,7 +1356,7 @@ specified by the variable @code{ada-case-exception-file}
specifies the casing of one word or word fragment. Comments may be
included, separated from the word by a space.
If the word starts with an asterisk (@key{*}), it defines the casing
If the word starts with an asterisk (@samp{*}), it defines the casing
as a word fragment (or ``substring''); part of a word between two
underscores or word boundary.
......
......@@ -12422,7 +12422,7 @@ Calculations are normally performed numerically wherever possible.
For example, the @code{calc-sqrt} command, or @code{sqrt} function in an
algebraic expression, produces a numeric answer if the argument is a
number or a symbolic expression if the argument is an expression:
@kbd{2 Q} pushes 1.4142 but @kbd{@key{'} x+1 @key{RET} Q} pushes @samp{sqrt(x+1)}.
@kbd{2 Q} pushes 1.4142 but @kbd{' x+1 @key{RET} Q} pushes @samp{sqrt(x+1)}.
@kindex m s
@pindex calc-symbolic-mode
......@@ -16338,7 +16338,7 @@ computes an Nth root: @kbd{125 @key{RET} 3 I ^} computes the number 5.
@tindex \
The @kbd{\} (@code{calc-idiv}) command divides two numbers on the stack
to produce an integer result. It is equivalent to dividing with
@key{/}, then rounding down with @kbd{F} (@code{calc-floor}), only a bit
@kbd{/}, then rounding down with @kbd{F} (@code{calc-floor}), only a bit
more convenient and efficient. Also, since it is an all-integer
operation when the arguments are integers, it avoids problems that
@kbd{/ F} would have with floating-point roundoff.
......@@ -30289,7 +30289,7 @@ is the same as @key{CONJ}.
@item INV *
is the same as @key{y^x}.
@item INV /
is the same as @key{INV y^x} (the @expr{x}th root of @expr{y}).
is the same as @kbd{INV y^x} (the @expr{x}th root of @expr{y}).
@item HYP/INV 1
are the same as @key{SIN} / @kbd{INV SIN}.
@item HYP/INV 2
......@@ -30366,9 +30366,9 @@ number. (@xref{Random Numbers}.) @key{RAGN} is the ``random
again'' command; it computes another random number using the
same limit as last time.
@key{INV GCD} computes the LCM (least common multiple) function.
@kbd{INV GCD} computes the LCM (least common multiple) function.
@key{INV FACT} is the gamma function.
@kbd{INV FACT} is the gamma function.
@texline @math{\Gamma(x) = (x-1)!}.
@infoline @expr{gamma(x) = (x-1)!}.
......@@ -30396,14 +30396,14 @@ finds the previous prime.
@noindent
The keys in this menu perform operations on binary integers.
Note that both logical and arithmetic right-shifts are provided.
@key{INV LSH} rotates one bit to the left.
@kbd{INV LSH} rotates one bit to the left.
The ``difference'' function (normally on @kbd{b d}) is on @key{INV AND}.
The ``clip'' function (normally on @w{@kbd{b c}}) is on @key{INV NOT}.
The ``difference'' function (normally on @kbd{b d}) is on @kbd{INV AND}.
The ``clip'' function (normally on @w{@kbd{b c}}) is on @kbd{INV NOT}.
The @key{DEC}, @key{HEX}, @key{OCT}, and @key{BIN} keys select the
current radix for display and entry of numbers: Decimal, hexadecimal,
octal, or binary. The six letter keys @key{A} through @key{F} are used
octal, or binary. The six letter keys @kbd{A} through @kbd{F} are used
for entering hexadecimal numbers.
The @key{WSIZ} key displays the current word size for binary operations
......@@ -30461,13 +30461,13 @@ equivalent to @kbd{u +} in normal Calc (@pxref{Statistical Operations}).
@key{PROD} computes the product of the elements of a vector, and
@key{MAX} computes the maximum of all the elements of a vector.
@key{INV SUM} computes the alternating sum of the first element
@kbd{INV SUM} computes the alternating sum of the first element
minus the second, plus the third, minus the fourth, and so on.
@key{INV MAX} computes the minimum of the vector elements.
@kbd{INV MAX} computes the minimum of the vector elements.
@key{HYP SUM} computes the mean of the vector elements.
@key{HYP PROD} computes the sample standard deviation.
@key{HYP MAX} computes the median.
@kbd{HYP SUM} computes the mean of the vector elements.
@kbd{HYP PROD} computes the sample standard deviation.
@kbd{HYP MAX} computes the median.
@key{MAP*} multiplies two vectors elementwise. It is equivalent
to the @kbd{V M *} command. @key{MAP^} computes powers elementwise.
......@@ -1557,7 +1557,7 @@ selective browsing. To change the default Ediff function, add a function to
@strong{Useful hint}: To specify a regexp that matches everything, don't
simply type @key{RET} in response to a prompt. Typing @key{RET} tells Ediff
to accept the default value, which may not be what you want. Instead, you
should enter something like @key{^} or @key{$}. These match every
should enter something like @kbd{^} or @kbd{$}. These match every
line.
You can use the status command, @kbd{i}, to find out whether
......
......@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ of which varies according to Windows version and whether the computer is
part of a domain.
@end enumerate
Within Emacs, @key{~} at the beginning of a file name is expanded to your
Within Emacs, @kbd{~} at the beginning of a file name is expanded to your
@env{HOME} directory, so you can always find your @file{.emacs} file
by typing the command @kbd{C-x C-f ~/.emacs}.
......
......@@ -134,14 +134,14 @@ used in the FAQ.
@itemize @bullet
@item
@kbd{C-x}: press the @key{x} key while holding down the @key{Control} key
@kbd{C-x}: press the @kbd{x} key while holding down the @key{Control} key
@item
@kbd{M-x}: press the @key{x} key while holding down the @key{Meta} key
@kbd{M-x}: press the @kbd{x} key while holding down the @key{Meta} key
(if your computer doesn't have a @key{Meta} key, @pxref{No Meta key})
@item
@kbd{M-C-x}: press the @key{x} key while holding down both @key{Control}
@kbd{M-C-x}: press the @kbd{x} key while holding down both @key{Control}
and @key{Meta}
@item
......@@ -181,10 +181,10 @@ Any real spaces in such a key sequence should be ignored; only @key{SPC}
really means press the space key.
The @acronym{ASCII} code sent by @kbd{C-x} (except for @kbd{C-?}) is the value
that would be sent by pressing just @key{x} minus 96 (or 64 for
upper-case @key{X}) and will be from 0 to 31. On Unix and GNU/Linux
that would be sent by pressing just @kbd{x} minus 96 (or 64 for
upper-case @kbd{X}) and will be from 0 to 31. On Unix and GNU/Linux
terminals, the @acronym{ASCII} code sent by @kbd{M-x} is the sum of 128 and the
@acronym{ASCII} code that would be sent by pressing just @key{x}. Essentially,
@acronym{ASCII} code that would be sent by pressing just @kbd{x}. Essentially,
@key{Control} turns off bits 5 and 6 and @key{Meta} turns on bit
7@footnote{
DOS and Windows terminals don't set bit 7 when the @key{Meta} key is
......@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ what @kbd{M-x} and @key{RET} mean.)
@code{execute-extended-command}. This command allows you to run any
Emacs command if you can remember the command's name. If you can't
remember the command's name, you can type @key{TAB} and @key{SPC} for
completion, @key{?} for a list of possibilities, and @kbd{M-p} and
completion, @kbd{?} for a list of possibilities, and @kbd{M-p} and
@kbd{M-n} (or up-arrow and down-arrow) to see previous commands entered.
An Emacs @dfn{command} is an @dfn{interactive} Emacs function.
......@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ read this manual node inside Emacs (assuming nothing is broken) by
typing @kbd{C-h i m emacs @key{RET} m @var{topic} @key{RET}}.
This invokes Info, the GNU hypertext documentation browser. If you don't
already know how to use Info, type @key{?} from within Info.
already know how to use Info, type @kbd{?} from within Info.
If we refer to @var{topic}:@var{subtopic}, type @kbd{C-h i m emacs
@key{RET} m @var{topic} @key{RET} m @var{subtopic} @key{RET}}.
......@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ There are several methods for finding out how to do things in Emacs.
@item
The complete text of the Emacs manual is available via the Info
hypertext reader. Type @kbd{C-h r} to display the manual in Info mode.
Typing @key{h} immediately after entering Info will provide a short
Typing @kbd{h} immediately after entering Info will provide a short
tutorial on how to use it.
@cindex Lookup a subject in a manual
......@@ -761,7 +761,7 @@ named @samp{Top} in that file. For example, to view an Info file named
@end example
Alternatively, you can feed a file name to the @code{Info-goto-node}
command (invoked by pressing @key{g} in Info mode) by typing the name
command (invoked by pressing @kbd{g} in Info mode) by typing the name
of the file in parentheses, like this:
@example
......@@ -946,7 +946,7 @@ status of its latest version.
@cindex Original version of Emacs
Emacs originally was an acronym for Editor MACroS@. RMS says he ``picked
the name Emacs because @key{E} was not in use as an abbreviation on ITS at
the name Emacs because @kbd{E} was not in use as an abbreviation on ITS at
the time.'' The first Emacs was a set of macros written in 1976 at MIT
by RMS for the editor TECO (Text Editor and COrrector, originally Tape
Editor and COrrector) under ITS (the Incompatible Timesharing System) on
......@@ -2210,7 +2210,7 @@ and braces at the same time by modifying the syntax table.)
@cindex Show matching paren as in @code{vi}
@item
Here is some Emacs Lisp that will make the @key{%} key show the matching
Here is some Emacs Lisp that will make the @kbd{%} key show the matching
parenthesis, like in @code{vi}. In addition, if the cursor isn't over a
parenthesis, it simply inserts a % like normal.
......@@ -3963,8 +3963,8 @@ On many keyboards, the @key{Alt} key acts as @key{Meta}, so try it.
Instead of typing @kbd{M-a}, you can type @kbd{@key{ESC} a}. In fact,
Emacs converts @kbd{M-a} internally into @kbd{@key{ESC} a} anyway
(depending on the value of @code{meta-prefix-char}). Note that you
press @key{Meta} and @key{a} together, but with @key{ESC}, you press
@key{ESC}, release it, and then press @key{a}.
press @key{Meta} and @kbd{a} together, but with @key{ESC}, you press
@key{ESC}, release it, and then press @kbd{a}.
@node No Escape key
@section What if I don't have an @key{Escape} key?
......@@ -4457,9 +4457,9 @@ these systems, you should configure @code{movemail} to use @code{flock}.
@c isaacson@@seas.upenn.edu
Ron Isaacson says: When you hit
@key{r} to reply in Rmail, by default it CCs all of the original
@kbd{r} to reply in Rmail, by default it CCs all of the original
recipients (everyone on the original @samp{To} and @samp{CC}
lists). With a prefix argument (i.e., typing @kbd{C-u} before @key{r}),
lists). With a prefix argument (i.e., typing @kbd{C-u} before @kbd{r}),
it replies only to the sender. However, going through the whole
@kbd{C-u} business every time you want to reply is a pain. This is the
best fix I've been able to come up with:
......
......@@ -1204,7 +1204,7 @@ perform this on-thy-fly rewriting.
@item Write an alias for @command{less} that brings up a @code{view-mode} buffer
Such that the user can press @key{SPC} and @key{DEL}, and then @key{q}
Such that the user can press @key{SPC} and @key{DEL}, and then @kbd{q}
to return to Eshell. It would be equivalent to:
@samp{X > #<buffer Y>; view-buffer #<buffer Y>}.
......
......@@ -24548,7 +24548,7 @@ determined by either the @code{ham-process-destination} group
parameter or a match in the @code{gnus-ham-process-destinations}
variable, which is a list of regular expressions matched with group
names (it's easiest to customize this variable with @kbd{M-x
customize-variable @key{@key{RET}} gnus-ham-process-destinations}). Each
customize-variable @key{RET} gnus-ham-process-destinations}). Each
group name list is a standard Lisp list, if you prefer to customize
the variable manually. If the @code{ham-process-destination}
parameter is not set, ham articles are left in place. If the
......@@ -24584,7 +24584,7 @@ When you leave a @emph{ham} or @emph{unclassified} group, all
the @code{spam-process-destination} group parameter or a match in the
@code{gnus-spam-process-destinations} variable, which is a list of
regular expressions matched with group names (it's easiest to
customize this variable with @kbd{M-x customize-variable @key{@key{RET}}
customize this variable with @kbd{M-x customize-variable @key{RET}
gnus-spam-process-destinations}). Each group name list is a standard
Lisp list, if you prefer to customize the variable manually. If the
@code{spam-process-destination} parameter is not set, the spam
......@@ -28703,7 +28703,7 @@ commonly fetched via the protocol @acronym{NNTP}, whereas mail
messages could be read from a file on the local disk. The internal
architecture of Gnus thus comprises a ``front end'' and a number of
``back ends''. Internally, when you enter a group (by hitting
@key{@key{RET}}, say), you thereby invoke a function in the front end in
@key{RET}, say), you thereby invoke a function in the front end in
Gnus. The front end then ``talks'' to a back end and says things like
``Give me the list of articles in the foo group'' or ``Show me article
number 4711''.
......@@ -702,13 +702,13 @@ be located in the library. E.g., if you have scanned the IDL-Astro
library:
@example
a=readf@key{M-@key{TAB}}
a=readf@kbd{M-@key{TAB}}
@end example
expands to ``readfits(''. Then try
@example
a=readfits(@key{C-c ?}
a=readfits(@kbd{C-c ?}
@end example
and you get:
......@@ -2519,9 +2519,9 @@ between emacs and IDL sessions. Here is a list of commonly used
commands:
@multitable @columnfractions .12 .88
@item @key{UP}, @key{M-p}
@item @key{UP}, @kbd{M-p}
@tab Cycle backwards in input history
@item @key{DOWN}, @key{M-n}
@item @key{DOWN}, @kbd{M-n}
@tab Cycle forwards in input history
@item @kbd{M-r}
@tab Previous input matching a regexp
......@@ -3131,8 +3131,8 @@ variable, number, or function you see can be examined.
If the variable @code{idlwave-shell-separate-examine-output} is
non-@code{nil} (the default), all examine output will be sent to a
special @file{*Examine*} buffer, rather than the shell. The output of
prior examine commands is saved in this buffer. In this buffer @key{c}
clears the contents, and @key{q} hides the buffer.
prior examine commands is saved in this buffer. In this buffer @kbd{c}
clears the contents, and @kbd{q} hides the buffer.
The two most basic examine commands are bound to @kbd{C-c C-d C-p}, to
print the expression at point, and @kbd{C-c C-d ?}, to invoke help on
......@@ -4249,7 +4249,7 @@ This actually happens when running IDL in an XTerm as well. There are
a couple of workarounds: @code{define_key,/control,'^d'} (e.g., in
your @file{$IDL_STARTUP} file) will disable the @samp{EOF} character
and give you a 512 character limit. You won't be able to use
@key{C-d} to quit the shell, however. Another possibility is
@kbd{C-d} to quit the shell, however. Another possibility is
@code{!EDIT_INPUT=0}, which gives you an @emph{infinite} limit (OK, a
memory-bounded limit), but disables the processing of background
widget events (those with @code{/NO_BLOCK} passed to @code{XManager}).
......
......@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ brief list of commands. When you are finished looking at the list,
make it go away by typing @key{SPC} repeatedly.
@format
>> Type a @key{?} (or @key{H} in the stand-alone Info reader) now.
>> Type @kbd{?} (or @kbd{H} in the stand-alone Info reader) now.
Press @key{SPC} to see consecutive screenfuls of the list
until finished. Then type @key{SPC} several times. If
you are using Emacs, the help will then go away automatically.
......
......@@ -1470,8 +1470,8 @@ level).
Move subtree down (swap with next subtree of same level).
@orgcmd{M-h,org-mark-element}
Mark the element at point. Hitting repeatedly will mark subsequent elements
of the one just marked. E.g., hitting @key{M-h} on a paragraph will mark it,
hitting @key{M-h} immediately again will mark the next one.
of the one just marked. E.g., hitting @kbd{M-h} on a paragraph will mark it,
hitting @kbd{M-h} immediately again will mark the next one.
@orgcmd{C-c @@,org-mark-subtree}
Mark the subtree at point. Hitting repeatedly will mark subsequent subtrees
of the same level than the marked subtree.
......@@ -1838,7 +1838,7 @@ this:
@end example
You can interactively insert drawers at point by calling
@code{org-insert-drawer}, which is bound to @key{C-c C-x d}. With an active
@code{org-insert-drawer}, which is bound to @kbd{C-c C-x d}. With an active
region, this command will put the region inside the drawer. With a prefix
argument, this command calls @code{org-insert-property-drawer} and add
a property drawer right below the current headline. Completion over drawer
......@@ -4412,7 +4412,7 @@ Then each time you turn an entry from a TODO (not-done) state into any of the
DONE states, a line @samp{CLOSED: [timestamp]} will be inserted just after
the headline. If you turn the entry back into a TODO item through further
state cycling, that line will be removed again. If you turn the entry back
to a non-TODO state (by pressing @key{C-c C-t @key{SPC}} for example), that line
to a non-TODO state (by pressing @kbd{C-c C-t @key{SPC}} for example), that line
will also be removed, unless you set @code{org-closed-keep-when-no-todo} to
non-@code{nil}. If you want to record a note along with the timestamp,
use@footnote{The corresponding in-buffer setting is: @code{#+STARTUP:
......@@ -10608,7 +10608,7 @@ In-buffer settings may appear anywhere in the file, either directly or
indirectly through a file included using @samp{#+SETUPFILE: filename or URL}
syntax. Option keyword sets tailored to a particular back-end can be
inserted from the export dispatcher (@pxref{The export dispatcher}) using the
@code{Insert template} command by pressing @key{#}. To insert keywords
@code{Insert template} command by pressing @kbd{#}. To insert keywords
individually, a good way to make sure the keyword is correct is to type
@code{#+} and then to use @kbd{M-@key{TAB}}@footnote{Many desktops intercept
@kbd{M-@key{TAB}} to switch windows. Use @kbd{C-M-i} or @kbd{@key{ESC}
......@@ -15247,7 +15247,7 @@ Source code in the dialect of the specified language identifier.
edit buffer containing the body of the @samp{src} code block, ready for any
edits. @kbd{C-c '} again to close the buffer and return to the Org buffer.
@key{C-x C-s} saves the buffer and updates the contents of the Org buffer.
@kbd{C-x C-s} saves the buffer and updates the contents of the Org buffer.
Set @code{org-edit-src-auto-save-idle-delay} to save the base buffer after
a certain idle delay time.
......
......@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ commands that @samp{tag} or @samp{diff} a file (which can be changed
with the variable @code{cvs-invert-ignore-marks}).
In addition, you may use the special prefix @code{cvs-mode-toggle-marks}
normally bound to @key{T} to toggle the use of marks for the following
normally bound to @kbd{T} to toggle the use of marks for the following
command.
This scheme might seem a little complicated, but once one gets used to
......
......@@ -1710,8 +1710,8 @@ customizing @code{reftex-ref-macro-prompt} and relying only on the
selection facilities provided in the last step.
In the last step, i.e., the label selection, two key bindings are
provided to set the reference macro. Type @key{v} in order to cycle
forward through the list of available macros or @key{V} to cycle
provided to set the reference macro. Type @kbd{v} in order to cycle
forward through the list of available macros or @kbd{V} to cycle
backward. The mode line of the selection buffer shows the macro
currently selected.
......
......@@ -684,7 +684,7 @@ value of @code{sc-preferred-header-style}.
Set the preferred reference header (i.e.,
@code{sc-preferred-header-style}) to the currently displayed header.
@item @code{sc-eref-exit} (@kbd{C-j}, @key{RET}, and @key{ESC C-c})
@item @code{sc-eref-exit} (@kbd{C-j}, @key{RET}, and @kbd{@key{ESC} C-c})
@kindex RET
@kindex C-j
@kindex q
......
......@@ -3604,7 +3604,7 @@ Then specify a method and user name where needed. Examples:
@end group
@end example
In BBDB buffer, access an entry by pressing the key @key{F}.
In BBDB buffer, access an entry by pressing the key @kbd{F}.
@end enumerate
......
......@@ -1903,7 +1903,7 @@ by @kbd{o} or @kbd{O} command.
@item vip-tags-file-name "TAGS"
The name of the file used as the tags table.
@item vip-help-in-insert-mode nil
If @code{t} then @key{C-h} is bound to @code{help-command} in insert mode,
If @code{t} then @kbd{C-h} is bound to @code{help-command} in insert mode,
if @code{nil} then it sis bound to @code{delete-backward-char}.
@end table
@noindent
......
......@@ -1743,7 +1743,7 @@ lines, etc. @xref{Movement and Markers}, for more info.
@item viper-ex-style-editing t
Set this to @code{nil}, if you want
@kbd{C-h} and @key{DEL} to not stop
at the beginning of a line in Insert state, @key{X} and @key{x} to delete
at the beginning of a line in Insert state, @kbd{X} and @kbd{x} to delete
characters across lines in Vi command state, etc.
@item viper-ESC-moves-cursor-back t
It @code{t}, cursor moves back 1 character when switching from insert state to vi
......
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