Commit 91ec56a9 authored by Stefan Monnier's avatar Stefan Monnier
Browse files

Use ;; instead of ;;; to better follow coding conventions.

parent c58dccad
......@@ -31974,7 +31974,7 @@ decreases the precision.
 
@smallexample
;;; Increase and decrease Calc precision. Dave Gillespie, 5/31/91.
;;; (Include copyright or copyleft stuff here.)
;; (Include copyright or copyleft stuff here.)
 
(defvar inc-prec-base-key "P"
"Base key for inc-prec.el commands.")
......@@ -1112,16 +1112,16 @@ variables list afterward.
Here is an example of a local variables list:
@example
;;; Local Variables: ***
;;; mode:lisp ***
;;; comment-column:0 ***
;;; comment-start: ";;; " ***
;;; comment-end:"***" ***
;;; End: ***
;; Local Variables: **
;; mode:lisp **
;; comment-column:0 **
;; comment-start: ";; " **
;; comment-end:"**" **
;; End: **
@end example
Each line starts with the prefix @samp{;;; } and each line ends with
the suffix @samp{ ***}. Emacs recognizes these as the prefix and
Each line starts with the prefix @samp{;; } and each line ends with
the suffix @samp{ **}. Emacs recognizes these as the prefix and
suffix based on the first line of the list, by finding them
surrounding the magic string @samp{Local Variables:}; then it
automatically discards them from the other lines of the list.
......@@ -1129,8 +1129,8 @@ automatically discards them from the other lines of the list.
The usual reason for using a prefix and/or suffix is to embed the
local variables list in a comment, so it won't confuse other programs
that the file is intended as input for. The example above is for a
language where comment lines start with @samp{;;; } and end with
@samp{***}; the local values for @code{comment-start} and
language where comment lines start with @samp{;; } and end with
@samp{**}; the local values for @code{comment-start} and
@code{comment-end} customize the rest of Emacs for this unusual
syntax. Don't use a prefix (or a suffix) if you don't need one.
......
......@@ -298,9 +298,9 @@ In order to have @code{dired-jump} and @code{dired-jump-other-window}
for these functions. In your @file{.emacs} file put
@example
;;; Autoload `dired-jump' and `dired-jump-other-window'.
;;; We autoload from FILE dired.el. This will then load dired-x.el
;;; and hence define `dired-jump' and `dired-jump-other-window'.
;; Autoload `dired-jump' and `dired-jump-other-window'.
;; We autoload from FILE dired.el. This will then load dired-x.el
;; and hence define `dired-jump' and `dired-jump-other-window'.
(define-key global-map "\C-x\C-j" 'dired-jump)
(define-key global-map "\C-x4\C-j" 'dired-jump-other-window)
......
......@@ -4532,7 +4532,7 @@ instead:
@lisp
(global-set-key "\C-h" 'delete-backward-char)
;;; overrides mark-whole-buffer
;; overrides mark-whole-buffer
(global-set-key "\C-xh" 'help-command)
@end lisp
......@@ -4664,7 +4664,7 @@ under X). For many terminals (notably DEC terminals) @key{F11}
generates @key{ESC}. If not, the following form can be used to bind it:
@lisp
;;; F11 is the documented ESC replacement on DEC terminals.
;; F11 is the documented ESC replacement on DEC terminals.
(define-key function-key-map [f11] [?\e])
@end lisp
......
......@@ -18849,20 +18849,20 @@ setup, you may be able to use something like the following as your
@file{~/.gnus.el} file to get started.
 
@lisp
;;; @r{Define how Gnus is to fetch news. We do this over @acronym{NNTP}}
;;; @r{from your ISP's server.}
;; @r{Define how Gnus is to fetch news. We do this over @acronym{NNTP}}
;; @r{from your ISP's server.}
(setq gnus-select-method '(nntp "news.your-isp.com"))
 
;;; @r{Define how Gnus is to read your mail. We read mail from}
;;; @r{your ISP's @acronym{POP} server.}
;; @r{Define how Gnus is to read your mail. We read mail from}
;; @r{your ISP's @acronym{POP} server.}
(setq mail-sources '((pop :server "pop.your-isp.com")))
 
;;; @r{Say how Gnus is to store the mail. We use nnml groups.}
;; @r{Say how Gnus is to store the mail. We use nnml groups.}
(setq gnus-secondary-select-methods '((nnml "")))
 
;;; @r{Make Gnus into an offline newsreader.}
;;; (gnus-agentize) ; @r{The obsolete setting.}
;;; (setq gnus-agent t) ; @r{Now the default.}
;; @r{Make Gnus into an offline newsreader.}
;; (gnus-agentize) ; @r{The obsolete setting.}
;; (setq gnus-agent t) ; @r{Now the default.}
@end lisp
 
That should be it, basically. Put that in your @file{~/.gnus.el} file,
......
......@@ -954,10 +954,10 @@ these conventions by indenting a double-semicolon comment using @key{TAB},
and by not changing the indentation of a triple-semicolon comment at all.
@example
;; This function is just an example
;;; Here either two or three semicolons are appropriate.
;; This function is just an example.
;; Here either two or three semicolons are appropriate.
(defun foo (x)
;;; And now, the first part of the function:
;;; And now, the first part of the function:
;; The following line adds one.
(1+ x)) ; This line adds one.
@end example
......
......@@ -2558,9 +2558,9 @@ Viper provides some support for multi-file documents and programs.
If a document consists of several files we can designate one of them as a
master and put the following at the end of that file:
@lisp
;;; Local Variables:
;;; eval: (viper-setup-master-buffer "file1" "file2" "file3" "file4")
;;; End:
;; Local Variables:
;; eval: (viper-setup-master-buffer "file1" "file2" "file3" "file4")
;; End:
@end lisp
@noindent
where @code{file1} to @code{file4} are names of files related to the master
......@@ -2578,7 +2578,7 @@ These commands are akin to @kbd{:n} and @kbd{:N}, but they allow the user to
focus on relevant files only.
Note that only the master file needs to have the aforementioned block of
commands. Also, ";;;" above can be replaced by some other
commands. Also, ";;" above can be replaced by some other
markers. Semicolon is good for Lisp programs, since it is considered a
comment designator there. For LaTeX, this could be "%%%", and for C the
above block should be commented out.
......
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