Commit 939db9ac authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

More edits to Display chapter of Emacs manual.

* doc/emacs/display.texi (Fringes): Move overflow-newline-into-fringe here,
from Line Truncation node.
(Standard Faces): Note that only the background of the cursor face
has an effect.
(Cursor Display): Fix descriptions of cursor face
and bar cursor blinking.
(Text Display): Document nobreak-char-display more clearly.
(Line Truncation): Add xref to Split Window node.
(Display Custom): Don't bother documenting baud-rate or
no-redraw-on-reenter.

* doc/emacs/search.texi (Slow Isearch): Node removed.
parent 4e948d15
......@@ -162,7 +162,7 @@ commands.texi cyd
custom.texi
dired.texi
dired-xtra.texi
display.texi
display.texi cyd
emacs.texi
emacs-xtra.texi
emerge-xtra.texi
......
2011-10-18 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* display.texi (Fringes): Move overflow-newline-into-fringe here,
from Line Truncation node.
(Standard Faces): Note that only the background of the cursor face
has an effect.
(Cursor Display): Fix descriptions of cursor face
and bar cursor blinking.
(Text Display): Document nobreak-char-display more clearly.
(Line Truncation): Add xref to Split Window node.
(Display Custom): Don't bother documenting baud-rate or
no-redraw-on-reenter.
* search.texi (Slow Isearch): Node removed.
2011-10-18 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* maintaining.texi (Registering): Remove vc-initial-comment. (Bug#9745)
......
......@@ -554,7 +554,7 @@ Whitespace}).
The face for displaying control characters and escape sequences
(@pxref{Text Display}).
@item nobreak-space
The face for displaying ``non-breaking'' space characters (@pxref{Text
The face for displaying ``no-break'' space characters (@pxref{Text
Display}).
@end table
......@@ -599,7 +599,8 @@ displays. (The fringes are the narrow portions of the Emacs frame
between the text area and the window's right and left borders.)
@xref{Fringes}.
@item cursor
This face determines the color of the text cursor.
The @code{:background} attribute of this face specifies the color of
the text cursor. @xref{Cursor Display}.
@item tooltip
This face is used for tooltip text. By default, if Emacs is built
with GTK support, tooltips are drawn via GTK and this face has no
......@@ -901,9 +902,14 @@ mode's symbol is a member of the list @code{hi-lock-exclude-modes}.
@section Window Fringes
@cindex fringes
On a graphical display, each Emacs window normally has narrow
@findex set-fringe-style
@findex fringe-mode
On graphical displays, each Emacs window normally has narrow
@dfn{fringes} on the left and right edges. The fringes are used to
display symbols that provide information about the text in the window.
You can type @kbd{M-x fringe-mode} to disable the fringes, or modify
their width. This command affects fringes in all frames; to modify
fringes on the selected frame only, use @kbd{M-x set-fringe-style}.
The most common use of the fringes is to indicate a continuation
line (@pxref{Continuation Lines}). When one line of text is split
......@@ -924,17 +930,18 @@ scrolls the display horizontally in the direction of the arrow.
boundaries (@pxref{Displaying Boundaries}), and where a program you
are debugging is executing (@pxref{Debuggers}).
@findex set-fringe-style
@findex fringe-mode
You can enable and disable the fringes for all frames using
@kbd{M-x fringe-mode}. To enable and disable the fringes
for the selected frame, use @kbd{M-x set-fringe-style}.
@vindex overflow-newline-into-fringe
The fringe is also used for drawing the cursor, if the current line
is exactly as wide as the window and point is at the end of the line.
To disable this, change the variable
@code{overflow-newline-into-fringe} to @code{nil}; this causes Emacs
to continue or truncate lines that are exactly as wide as the window.
@node Displaying Boundaries
@section Displaying Boundaries
@vindex indicate-buffer-boundaries
On a graphical display, Emacs can indicate the buffer boundaries in
On graphical displays, Emacs can indicate the buffer boundaries in
the fringes. If you enable this feature, the first line and the last
line are marked with angle images in the fringes. This can be
combined with up and down arrow images which say whether it is
......@@ -1127,14 +1134,15 @@ set the variable @code{display-time-24hr-format} to @code{t}.
@vindex display-time-mail-file
@vindex display-time-mail-directory
The word @samp{Mail} appears after the load level if there is mail
for you that you have not read yet. On a graphical display you can use
an icon instead of @samp{Mail} by customizing
@code{display-time-use-mail-icon}; this may save some space on the mode
line. You can customize @code{display-time-mail-face} to make the mail
indicator prominent. Use @code{display-time-mail-file} to specify
the mail file to check, or set @code{display-time-mail-directory}
to specify the directory to check for incoming mail (any nonempty regular
file in the directory is considered as ``newly arrived mail'').
for you that you have not read yet. On graphical displays, you can
use an icon instead of @samp{Mail} by customizing
@code{display-time-use-mail-icon}; this may save some space on the
mode line. You can customize @code{display-time-mail-face} to make
the mail indicator prominent. Use @code{display-time-mail-file} to
specify the mail file to check, or set
@code{display-time-mail-directory} to specify the directory to check
for incoming mail (any nonempty regular file in the directory is
considered as ``newly arrived mail'').
@cindex mail (on mode line)
@findex display-battery-mode
......@@ -1152,7 +1160,7 @@ percentage of the total charge.
@cindex mode line, 3D appearance
@cindex attributes of mode line, changing
@cindex non-integral number of lines in a window
On a graphical display, the mode line is drawn as a 3D box. If you
On graphical displays, the mode line is drawn as a 3D box. If you
don't like this effect, you can disable it by customizing the
@code{mode-line} face and setting its @code{box} attribute to
@code{nil}. @xref{Face Customization}.
......@@ -1218,17 +1226,23 @@ If you change the buffer-local variable @code{ctl-arrow} to
octal escape sequences instead of caret escape sequences.
@vindex nobreak-char-display
@cindex non-breaking space, display
@cindex non-breaking hyphen, display
@cindex soft hyphen, display
There are two special ``non-breaking'' versions of the space and
hyphen characters, which are used where a line should not be broken.
Emacs normally displays these characters with special faces
(respectively, @code{nobreak-space} and @code{escape-glyph}) to
distinguish them from ordinary spaces and hyphens. You can turn off
this feature by setting the variable @code{nobreak-char-display} to
@code{nil}. If you set the variable to any other value, that means to
prefix these characters with an escape character.
@cindex non-breaking space
@cindex non-breaking hyphen
@cindex soft hyphen
Some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters have the same appearance as an
@acronym{ASCII} space or hyphen (minus) character. Such characters
can cause problems if they are entered into a buffer without your
realization, e.g. by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
typically do not treat non-@acronym{ASCII} spaces as whitespace
characters. To deal with this problem, Emacs displays such characters
specially: it displays @code{U+00A0} (no-break space) with the
@code{nobreak-space} face, and it displays @code{U+00AD} (soft
hyphen), @code{U+2010} (hyphen), and @code{U+2011} (non-breaking
hyphen) with the @code{escape-glyph} face. To disable this, change
the variable @code{nobreak-char-display} to @code{nil}. If you give
this variable a non-@code{nil} and non-@code{t} value, Emacs instead
displays such characters as a highlighted backslash followed by a
space or hyphen.
You can customize the way any particular character code is displayed
by means of a display table. @xref{Display Tables,, Display Tables,
......@@ -1246,48 +1260,61 @@ for details.
@node Cursor Display
@section Displaying the Cursor
@findex blink-cursor-mode
@vindex blink-cursor-alist
@cindex cursor, locating visually
@cindex cursor, blinking
You can customize the cursor's color, and whether it blinks, using
the @code{cursor} Custom group (@pxref{Easy Customization}). On
a graphical display, the command @kbd{M-x blink-cursor-mode} enables
or disables the blinking of the cursor. (On text terminals, the
terminal itself blinks the cursor, and Emacs has no control over it.)
You can control how the cursor appears when it blinks off by setting
the variable @code{blink-cursor-alist}.
@vindex cursor-type
You can change the shape of the cursor from the default ``box'' look
to a bar by altering the @code{cursor-type} variable.
@cindex text cursor
@vindex visible-cursor
Some text terminals offer two different cursors: the normal cursor
and the very visible cursor, where the latter may be e.g. bigger or
blinking. By default Emacs uses the very visible cursor, and switches
to it when you start or resume Emacs. If the variable
@code{visible-cursor} is @code{nil} when Emacs starts or resumes, it
doesn't switch, so it uses the normal cursor.
On a text terminal, the cursor's appearance is controlled by the
terminal, largely out of the control of Emacs. Some terminals offer
two different cursors: a ``visible'' static cursor, and a ``very
visible'' blinking cursor. By default, Emacs uses the very visible
cursor, and switches to it when you start or resume Emacs. If the
variable @code{visible-cursor} is @code{nil} when Emacs starts or
resumes, it uses the normal cursor.
@cindex cursor face
@vindex cursor-type
On a graphical display, many more properties of the text cursor can
be altered. To customize its color, change the @code{:background}
attribute of the face named @code{cursor} (@pxref{Face
Customization}). (The other attributes of this face have no effect;
the text shown under the cursor is drawn using the frame's background
color.) To change its shape, customize the buffer-local variable
@code{cursor-type}; possible values are @code{box} (the default),
@code{hollow} (a hollow box), @code{bar} (a vertical bar), @code{(bar
. @var{n})} (a vertical bar @var{n} pixels wide), @code{hbar} (a
horizontal bar), @code{(hbar . @var{n})} (a horizontal bar @var{n}
pixels tall), or @code{nil} (no cursor at all).
@cindex cursor in non-selected windows
@vindex cursor-in-non-selected-windows
Normally, the cursor appears in non-selected windows without
blinking, with the same appearance as when the blinking cursor blinks
``off.'' For a box cursor, this is a hollow box; for a bar cursor,
this is a thinner bar. To turn off cursors in non-selected windows,
customize the variable @code{cursor-in-non-selected-windows} and
assign it a @code{nil} value.
@findex blink-cursor-mode
@cindex cursor, blinking
@cindex blinking cursor
@vindex blink-cursor-alist
To disable cursor blinking, change the variable
@code{blink-cursor-mode} to @code{nil} (@pxref{Easy Customization}),
or add the line @code{(blink-cursor-mode 0)} to your init file.
Alternatively, you can change how the cursor looks when it ``blinks
off'' by customizing the list variable @code{blink-cursor-alist}.
Each element in the list should have the form @code{(@var{on-type}
. @var{off-type})}; this means that if the cursor is displayed as
@var{on-type} when it blinks on (where @var{on-type} is one of the
cursor types described above), then it is displayed as @var{off-type}
when it blinks off.
@vindex x-stretch-cursor
@cindex wide block cursor
On graphical displays, Emacs can optionally draw the block cursor
as wide as the character under the cursor---for example, if the cursor
is on a tab character, it would cover the full width occupied by that
tab character. To enable this feature, set the variable
Some characters, such as tab characters, are ``extra wide''. When
the cursor is positioned over such a character, it is normally drawn
with the default character width. You can make the cursor stretch to
cover wide characters, by changing the variable
@code{x-stretch-cursor} to a non-@code{nil} value.
@cindex cursor in non-selected windows
@vindex cursor-in-non-selected-windows
The cursor normally appears in non-selected windows as a
non-blinking hollow box. (For a bar cursor, it instead appears as a
thinner bar.) To turn off cursors in non-selected windows, change the
variable @code{cursor-in-non-selected-windows} to @code{nil}.
@findex hl-line-mode
@findex global-hl-line-mode
@cindex highlight current line
......@@ -1297,18 +1324,17 @@ hl-line-mode} to enable or disable it in the current buffer. @kbd{M-x
global-hl-line-mode} enables or disables the same mode globally.
@node Line Truncation
@section Truncation of Lines
@section Line Truncation
@cindex truncation
@cindex line truncation, and fringes
As an alternative to continuation (@pxref{Continuation Lines}), Emacs
can display long lines by @dfn{truncation}. This means that all the
characters that do not fit in the width of the screen or window do not
appear at all. On graphical displays, a small straight arrow in the
fringe indicates truncation at either end of the line. On text-only
terminals, @samp{$} appears in the leftmost column when there is text
truncated to the left, and in the rightmost column when there is text
truncated to the right.
As an alternative to continuation (@pxref{Continuation Lines}),
Emacs can display long lines by @dfn{truncation}. This means that all
the characters that do not fit in the width of the screen or window do
not appear at all. On graphical displays, a small straight arrow in
the fringe indicates truncation at either end of the line. On
text-only terminals, this is indicated with @samp{$} signs in the
leftmost and/or rightmost columns.
@vindex truncate-lines
@findex toggle-truncate-lines
......@@ -1320,21 +1346,12 @@ toggle-truncate-lines}. This works by locally changing the variable
are truncated; if it is @code{nil}, they are continued onto multiple
screen lines. Setting the variable @code{truncate-lines} in any way
makes it local to the current buffer; until that time, the default
value is in effect. The default value is normally @code{nil}.
@c @vindex truncate-partial-width-windows @c Idx entry is in Split Windows.
If the variable @code{truncate-partial-width-windows} is
non-@code{nil}, it forces truncation rather than continuation in any
window less than the full width of the screen or frame, regardless of
the value of @code{truncate-lines}. See also @ref{Display,, Display,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
value, which is normally @code{nil}, is in effect.
@vindex overflow-newline-into-fringe
If the variable @code{overflow-newline-into-fringe} is
non-@code{nil} on a graphical display, then Emacs does not continue or
truncate a line which is exactly as wide as the window. Instead, the
newline overflows into the right fringe, and the cursor appears in the
fringe when positioned on that newline.
@vindex truncate-partial-width-windows
If a split window becomes too narrow, Emacs may automatically enable
line truncation. @xref{Split Window}, for the variable
@code{truncate-partial-width-windows} which controls this.
@node Visual Line Mode
@section Visual Line Mode
......@@ -1387,11 +1404,8 @@ variable @code{visual-line-fringe-indicators}.
@node Display Custom
@section Customization of Display
This section describes variables (@pxref{Variables}) that you can
change to customize how Emacs displays. Beginning users can skip
it.
@c the reason for that pxref is because an xref early in the
@c ``echo area'' section leads here.
This section describes variables that control miscellaneous aspects
of the appearance of the Emacs screen. Beginning users can skip it.
@vindex visible-bell
If the variable @code{visible-bell} is non-@code{nil}, Emacs attempts
......@@ -1405,18 +1419,6 @@ keys; its value is the number of seconds of pause required to cause echoing
to start, or zero, meaning don't echo at all. The value takes effect when
there is someting to echo. @xref{Echo Area}.
@vindex baud-rate
The variable @anchor{baud-rate}@code{baud-rate} holds the output
speed of the terminal. Setting this variable does not change the
speed of actual data transmission, but the value is used for
calculations. On text-only terminals, it affects padding, and
decisions about whether to scroll part of the screen or redraw it
instead. It also affects the behavior of incremental search. On
graphical displays, @code{baud-rate} is only used to determine how
frequently to look for pending input during display updating. A
higher value of @code{baud-rate} means that check for pending input
will be done less frequently.
@cindex mouse pointer
@cindex hourglass pointer display
@vindex display-hourglass
......@@ -1458,15 +1460,3 @@ itself, in pixels; the default is 2.
result in text that is hard to read. Call the function
@code{tty-suppress-bold-inverse-default-colors} with a non-@code{nil}
argument to suppress the effect of bold-face in this case.
@vindex no-redraw-on-reenter
On a text-only terminal, when you reenter Emacs after suspending, Emacs
normally clears the screen and redraws the entire display. On some
terminals with more than one page of memory, it is possible to arrange
the termcap entry so that the @samp{ti} and @samp{te} strings (output
to the terminal when Emacs is entered and exited, respectively) switch
between pages of memory so as to use one page for Emacs and another
page for other output. On such terminals, you might want to set the variable
@code{no-redraw-on-reenter} non-@code{nil}; this tells Emacs to
assume, when resumed, that the screen page it is using still contains
what Emacs last wrote there.
......@@ -388,7 +388,6 @@ Incremental Search
or else edit the search string.
* Isearch Scroll:: Scrolling during an incremental search.
* Isearch Minibuffer:: Incremental search of the minibuffer history.
* Slow Isearch:: Incremental search features for slow terminals.
Replacement Commands
......
......@@ -60,7 +60,6 @@ Incremental search backward (@code{isearch-backward}).
or else edit the search string.
* Isearch Scroll:: Scrolling during an incremental search.
* Isearch Minibuffer:: Incremental search of the minibuffer history.
* Slow Isearch:: Incremental search features for slow terminals.
@end menu
@node Basic Isearch
......@@ -362,30 +361,6 @@ normally (e.g. by typing @key{RET}), it remains in the minibuffer
afterwards. Cancelling the search, with @kbd{C-g}, restores the
contents of the minibuffer when you began the search.
@node Slow Isearch
@subsection Slow Terminal Incremental Search
Incremental search on a slow terminal uses a modified style of display
that is designed to take less time. Instead of redisplaying the buffer at
each place the search gets to, it creates a new single-line window and uses
that to display the line that the search has found. The single-line window
comes into play as soon as point moves outside of the text that is already
on the screen.
When you terminate the search, the single-line window is removed.
Emacs then redisplays the window in which the search was done, to show
its new position of point.
@vindex search-slow-speed
The slow terminal style of display is used when the terminal baud rate is
less than or equal to the value of the variable @code{search-slow-speed},
initially 1200. See also the discussion of the variable @code{baud-rate}
(@pxref{baud-rate,, Customization of Display}).
@vindex search-slow-window-lines
The number of lines to use in slow terminal search display is controlled
by the variable @code{search-slow-window-lines}. Its normal value is 1.
@node Nonincremental Search
@section Nonincremental Search
@cindex nonincremental search
......
......@@ -109,9 +109,9 @@ and pops down the *Completions* buffer accordingly.
*** Completion can cycle, depending on completion-cycle-threshold.
+++
*** New completion style `substring'.
+++
*** Completion style can be set per-category `completion-category-overrides'.
+++
*** Completion of buffers now uses substring completion by default.
** Mail changes
......@@ -225,6 +225,10 @@ cannot be encoded by the `terminal-coding-system'.
---
*** New input methods for Farsi: farsi and farsi-translit.
+++
*** `nobreak-char-display' now also highlights Unicode hyphen chars
(U+2010 and U+2011).
** Improved GTK integration
*** GTK scroll-bars are now placed on the right by default.
......
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