Commit 95486d46 authored by Michael Witten's avatar Michael Witten Committed by Chong Yidong

* tutorials/TUTORIAL: Copyedits.

Fixes: debbugs:11689
parent 938a4ef9
2012-07-07 Michael Witten <mfwitten@gmail.com> (tiny change)
* tutorials/TUTORIAL: Copyedits (Bug#11689).
2012-06-28 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* emacs.py, emacs2.py, emacs3.py: Remove files, no longer used.
......
......@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ The characters ">>" at the left margin indicate directions for you to
try using a command. For instance:
<<Blank lines inserted around following line by help-with-tutorial>>
[Middle of page left blank for didactic purposes. Text continues below]
>> Now type C-v (View next screen) to move to the next screen.
>> Now type C-v (View next screen) to move to the next screen.
(go ahead, do it by holding down the CONTROL key while typing v).
From now on, you should do this again whenever you finish
reading the screen.
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ to place in the text. You already know how to move forward one screen,
with C-v. To move backwards one screen, type M-v (hold down the META key
and type v, or type <ESC>v if you do not have a META, EDIT, or ALT key).
>> Try typing M-v and then C-v, a few times.
>> Try typing M-v and then C-v, a few times.
* SUMMARY
......@@ -209,12 +209,12 @@ prefix argument, regardless of its value, makes the command do
something different.
C-v and M-v are another kind of exception. When given an argument,
they scroll the screen up or down by that many lines, rather than by a
screenful. For example, C-u 8 C-v scrolls the screen by 8 lines.
they scroll the text up or down by that many lines, rather than by a
screenful. For example, C-u 8 C-v scrolls by 8 lines.
>> Try typing C-u 8 C-v now.
This should have scrolled the screen up by 8 lines. If you would like
This should have scrolled the text up by 8 lines. If you would like
to scroll it down again, you can give an argument to M-v.
If you are using a graphical display, such as X or MS-Windows, there
......@@ -281,8 +281,6 @@ other windows.
>> Type C-x 1 and see the documentation listing window disappear.
This command is unlike the other commands you have learned in that it
consists of two characters. It starts with the character CONTROL-x.
There is a whole series of commands that start with CONTROL-x; many of
them have to do with windows, files, buffers, and related things.
These commands are two, three or four characters long.
......@@ -337,7 +335,7 @@ Remember that most Emacs commands can be given a repeat count;
this includes text characters. Repeating a text character inserts
it several times.
>> Try that now -- type C-u 8 * to insert ********.
>> Try that now -- type C-u 8 * to insert ********.
You've now learned the most basic way of typing something in
Emacs and correcting errors. You can delete by words or lines
......@@ -522,11 +520,8 @@ command
This copies the text within Emacs into the file. The first time you
do this, Emacs renames the original file to a new name so that it is
not lost. The new name is made by adding "~" to the end of the
original file's name.
When saving is finished, Emacs displays the name of the file written.
You should save fairly often, so that you will not lose very much
work if the system should crash (see the section "Auto Save" below).
original file's name. When saving is finished, Emacs displays the
name of the file written.
>> Type C-x C-s TUTORIAL <Return>.
This should save this tutorial to a file named TUTORIAL, and show
......@@ -534,11 +529,11 @@ work if the system should crash (see the section "Auto Save" below).
You can find an existing file, to view it or edit it. You can also
find a file which does not already exist. This is the way to create a
file with Emacs: find the file, which will start out empty, and then
begin inserting the text for the file. When you ask to "save" the
file, Emacs will really create the file with the text that you have
inserted. From then on, you can consider yourself to be editing an
already existing file.
file with Emacs: find the file, which starts out empty, and then begin
inserting the text for the file. When you ask to "save" the file,
Emacs actually creates the file with the text that you have inserted.
From then on, you can consider yourself to be editing an already
existing file.
* BUFFERS
......@@ -595,8 +590,8 @@ this does not save the first file. Its changes remain inside Emacs,
in that file's buffer. The creation or editing of the second file's
buffer has no effect on the first file's buffer. This is very useful,
but it also means that you need a convenient way to save the first
file's buffer. It would be a nuisance to have to switch back to
it with C-x C-f in order to save it with C-x C-s. So we have
file's buffer. Having to switch back to that buffer, in order to save
it with C-x C-s, would be a nuisance. So we have
C-x s Save some buffers
......@@ -631,7 +626,7 @@ If you are using a graphical display, you don't need any special
command to move from Emacs to another application. You can do this
with the mouse or with window manager commands. However, if you're
using a text terminal which can only show one application at a time,
you need to "suspend" Emacs to move to any other program.
you need to "suspend" Emacs to move to any other application.
C-z is the command to exit Emacs *temporarily*--so that you can go
back to the same Emacs session afterward. When Emacs is running on a
......@@ -640,8 +635,8 @@ but does not destroy the Emacs job. In the most common shells, you
can resume Emacs with the `fg' command or with `%emacs'.
The time to use C-x C-c is when you are about to log out. It's also
the right thing to use to exit an Emacs invoked under mail handling
programs and other miscellaneous utilities.
the right thing to use to exit an Emacs invoked for a quick edit, such
as by a mail handling utility.
There are many C-x commands. Here is a list of the ones you have learned:
......@@ -656,8 +651,8 @@ There are many C-x commands. Here is a list of the ones you have learned:
Named eXtended commands are commands which are used even less
frequently, or commands which are used only in certain modes. An
example is the command replace-string, which globally replaces one
string with another. When you type M-x, Emacs prompts you at the
example is the command replace-string, which replaces one string with
another in the buffer. When you type M-x, Emacs prompts you at the
bottom of the screen with M-x and you should type the name of the
command; in this case, "replace-string". Just type "repl s<TAB>" and
Emacs will complete the name. (<TAB> is the Tab key, usually found
......@@ -671,9 +666,9 @@ argument with <Return>.
>> Move the cursor to the blank line two lines below this one.
Then type M-x repl s<Return>changed<Return>altered<Return>.
Notice how this line has changed: you've replaced
the word c-h-a-n-g-e-d with "altered" wherever it occurred,
after the initial position of the cursor.
Notice how this line has changed: you've replaced the word
"changed" with "altered" wherever it occurred, after the
initial position of the cursor.
* AUTO SAVE
......@@ -762,6 +757,7 @@ differently.
To view documentation on your current major mode, type C-h m.
>> Move the cursor to the line following this line.
>> Type C-l C-l to bring this line to the top of screen.
>> Type C-h m, to see how Text mode differs from Fundamental mode.
>> Type C-x 1 to remove the documentation from the screen.
......@@ -893,7 +889,8 @@ display, those cursors are drawn as unblinking hollow boxes.
The command C-M-v is very useful when you are editing text in one
window and using the other window just for reference. Without leaving
the selected window, you can scroll the other window with C-M-v.
the selected window, you can scroll the text in the other window with
C-M-v.
C-M-v is an example of a CONTROL-META character. If you have a META
(or Alt) key, you can type C-M-v by holding down both CONTROL and META
......@@ -1041,8 +1038,8 @@ You need to type in the name of the variable when Emacs prompts for it.
>> Type C-h a file <Return>.
This displays in another window a list of all M-x commands with "file"
in their names. You will see character-commands like C-x C-f listed
beside the corresponding command names such as find-file.
in their names. You will see character-commands listed beside the
corresponding command names (such as C-x C-f beside find-file).
>> Type C-M-v to scroll the help window. Do this a few times.
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment