Commit 99a3e35f authored by Alex Schroeder's avatar Alex Schroeder
Browse files

Changed single spaces after sentence end to double

spaces. Fixed some typos.
(Internet Relay Chat): Explain relay.
(Getting started with rcirc): Change items to reflect prompts.
Add more explanation to rcirc-track-minor-mode and added a comment to
warn future maintainers that this section is a copy.
parent 125a630f
2007-12-21 Alex Schroeder <alex@gnu.org>
* rcirc.texi: Changed single spaces after sentence end to double
spaces. Fixed some typos.
(Internet Relay Chat): Explain relay.
(Getting started with rcirc): Change items to reflect prompts.
Add more explanation to rcirc-track-minor-mode and added a comment to
warn future maintainers that this section is a copy.
2007-12-20 Alex Schroeder <alex@gnu.org>
* rcirc.texi (Top): Fighting Information Overload chapter added.
......
......@@ -120,8 +120,8 @@ communication.
@cindex server
@cindex network
Contrary to most Instant Messenger (IM) systems, users usually don't
connect to a central server. Instead, users connect to a random server
in a network, and the servers share information between them.
connect to a central server. Instead, users connect to a random
server in a network, and servers relay messages from one to the next.
Here's a typical example:
......@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ using a different nick. This will prompt you for four things:
@table @asis
@cindex server, connecting
@cindex Freenode network
@item IRC server
@item IRC Server
What server do you want to connect to? All the servers in a particular
network are equivalent. Some networks use a round-robin system where a
single server redirects new connections to a random server in the
......@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ communities and organizations.''
@cindex port, connecting
@cindex 6667, default IRC port
@item IRC port
@item IRC Port
All network connections require a port. Just as web servers and clients
use port 80 per default, IRC uses port 6667 per default. You rarely
have to use a different port.
......@@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ have to use a different port.
@cindex nick, connecting
@cindex changing nick
@cindex name changes
@item IRC nick
@item IRC Nick
@vindex user-login-name
Every users needs a handle on-line. You will automatically be assigned
a slightly different nick if your chosen nick is already in use. If
......@@ -203,7 +203,7 @@ in use, you might for example get assigned the nick @code{alex`}.
@cindex channels, connecting
@cindex initial channels
@cindex startup channels
@item Channels
@item IRC Channels
A space separated list of channels you want to join when connecting.
You don't need to join any channels, if you just want to have one-to-one
conversations with friends on the same network. If you're new to the
......@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ and a channel buffer for each of the channels you wanted to join.
@kindex RET
@cindex talking
@cindex communicating
To talk in a channel, just type in what you want to say in a channel
To talk in a channel, just type what you want to say in a channel
buffer, and press @key{RET}.
@kindex C-c C-c
......@@ -233,15 +233,20 @@ C-c} to finish editing. You still need to press @key{RET} to send it,
though. Generally, IRC users don't like people pasting more than around
four lines of code, so use with care.
As soon as you have joined a channel, you probably want to be notified
of any activity on the the channels you joined. All you need to do is
switch channel tracking on using @kbd{M-x rcirc-track-minor-mode}. To
make this permanent, add the following to your init file:
@comment This section copied from the Channels section.
@comment All index markers should point to the original!
Once you are connected to multiple channels, or once you've turned you
attention to other buffers in Emacs, you probably want to be notified
of any activity in channels not currently visible. All you need to do
is switch channel tracking on using @kbd{M-x rcirc-track-minor-mode}.
To make this permanent, add the following to your init file:
@example
(rcirc-track-minor-mode 1)
@end example
Use @kbd{C-c C-@key{SPC}} to switch to these buffers.
@node Reference, Fighting Information Overload, Basics, Top
@chapter Reference
@cindex reference
......@@ -443,11 +448,12 @@ liking.
@cindex servers, configuration
@cindex initial servers, configuration
@cindex startup servers, configuration
This variable contains an alist of servers to connect to by default and
the keywords parameters to use. The keyword parameters are optional. If
you don't provide any, the defaults as documented below will be used.
This variable contains an alist of servers to connect to by default
and the keywords parameters to use. The keyword parameters are
optional. If you don't provide any, the defaults as documented below
will be used.
The most important parameter is the @code{:channels} parameter. It
The most important parameter is the @code{:channels} parameter. It
controls which channels you will join by default as soon as you are
connected to the server.
......@@ -476,14 +482,14 @@ This overrides @code{rcirc-default-user-name}.
This overrides @code{rcirc-default-full-name}.
@item :channels
This describes which channels to join when connecting to the server. If
absent, no channels will be connected to automatically.
This describes which channels to join when connecting to the server.
If absent, no channels will be connected to automatically.
@end table
@item rcirc-default-nick
@vindex rcirc-default-nick
This variable is used for the default nick. It defaults to the login
This variable is used for the default nick. It defaults to the login
name returned by @code{user-login-name}.
@example
......@@ -493,24 +499,24 @@ name returned by @code{user-login-name}.
@item rcirc-default-port
@vindex rcirc-default-port
@cindex port
This variable contains the default port to connect to. It is 6667 by
This variable contains the default port to connect to. It is 6667 by
default and rarely needs changing.
@item rcirc-default-user-name
@vindex rcirc-default-user-name
@cindex user name
This variable contains the default user name to report to the server. It
defaults to the login name returned by @code{user-login-name}, just like
@code{rcirc-default-nick}.
This variable contains the default user name to report to the server.
It defaults to the login name returned by @code{user-login-name}, just
like @code{rcirc-default-nick}.
@item rcirc-default-user-full-name
@vindex rcirc-default-user-full-name
@cindex full name
@cindex real name
@cindex surname
This variable is used to set your ``real name'' on
IRC. It defaults to the name returned by @code{user-full-name}. If you
want to hide your full name, you might want to set it to some pseudonym.
This variable is used to set your ``real name'' on IRC. It defaults
to the name returned by @code{user-full-name}. If you want to hide
your full name, you might want to set it to some pseudonym.
@example
(setq rcirc-default-user-full-name "Curious Minds Want To Know")
......@@ -523,10 +529,10 @@ want to hide your full name, you might want to set it to some pseudonym.
@cindex nickserv
@cindex login
This variable is an alist used to automatically identify yourself on
networks. Each sublist starts with a regular expression that is compared
to the server address you're connecting to. The second element in the
list is a symbol representing the method to use, followed by the
arguments this method requires.
networks. Each sublist starts with a regular expression that is
compared to the server address you're connecting to. The second
element in the list is a symbol representing the method to use,
followed by the arguments this method requires.
Here is an example to illustrate how you would set it:
......@@ -595,9 +601,9 @@ confuse the Bitlbee account with all the other accounts.
@cindex information overload
This is the section of the manual that caters to the busy person
online. There are support channels with several hundred people in
them. Trying to follow a conversation in these channels can be a
daunting task. This chapters tells you how @code{rcirc} can help.
online. There are support channels with several hundred people in
them. Trying to follow a conversation in these channels can be a
daunting task. This chapters tells you how @code{rcirc} can help.
@menu
* Channels::
......@@ -611,6 +617,7 @@ daunting task. This chapters tells you how @code{rcirc} can help.
@cindex channels
@cindex modeline
@comment This section copied to the Getting started with rcirc section
@kindex C-c C-SPC
@vindex rcirc-track-minor-mode
@cindex switching channels
......@@ -645,22 +652,22 @@ activation of this mode:
@cindex busy channels
If you've joined a very active support channel, tracking activity is
no longer useful. The channel will be always active. Switching to
no longer useful. The channel will be always active. Switching to
active channels using @kbd{C-c C-@key{SPC}} no longer works as
expected.
@kindex C-c C-l
@cindex low priority channels
The solution is to mark this channel as as a low priority channel.
Use @kbd{C-c C-l} to make the current channel a low-priority
channel. Low priority channels have the modeline indicator ``LowPri''.
Use @kbd{C-c C-l} to make the current channel a low-priority channel.
Low priority channels have the modeline indicator ``LowPri''.
@kbd{C-c C-@key{SPC}} will not switch to low priority channels unless
you use the @kbd{C-u} prefix.
@kindex C-c TAB
@cindex ignored channels
If you prefer a channel to never show up in the modeline, then you
have to ignore it. Use @kbd{C-c @key{TAB}} to ignore the current
have to ignore it. Use @kbd{C-c @key{TAB}} to ignore the current
channel.
@node People, Keywords, Channels, Fighting Information Overload
......@@ -672,7 +679,7 @@ channel.
@cindex trolls
The most important command available to the discerning IRC user is
@code{/ignore}. It's the big equalizer online: If people aggravate
@code{/ignore}. It's the big equalizer online: If people aggravate
you, just ignore them.
This is of course a crude all-or-nothing solution. Fear not,
......@@ -704,7 +711,7 @@ obnoxious fellows online. Example: @code{/ignore xah}.
This command toggles the bright status of a nick, if you provide one.
If you don't provide a nick, the command lists all the ``brightened''
nicks. All messages by brightened nicks are---you guessed
it---brightened. Use this for your friends. Example: @code{/bright
it---brightened. Use this for your friends. Example: @code{/bright
rcy}.
@item /dim
......@@ -715,8 +722,8 @@ rcy}.
This command toggles the dim status of a nick, if you provide one. If
you don't provide a nick, the command lists all the ``dimmed'' nicks.
All messages by dimmed nicks are---you guessed it---dimmed. Use this
for boring people and bots. If you are tracking channel activity,
messages by dimmed nicks will not register as activity. Example:
for boring people and bots. If you are tracking channel activity,
messages by dimmed nicks will not register as activity. Example:
@code{/dim fsbot}.
@end table
......@@ -726,18 +733,18 @@ messages by dimmed nicks will not register as activity. Example:
@cindex keywords
On a busy channel, you might want to ignore all activity (using
@kbd{C-c @key{TAB}}) and just watch for certain keywords. The
@kbd{C-c @key{TAB}}) and just watch for certain keywords. The
following command allows you to highlight certain keywords:
@table @code
@item /keyword
@cindex /keyword
This command toggles the highlighting of a keyword, if you provide
one. If you don't provide a keyword, the current keywords are
listed. Example: @code{/keyword manual}.
one. If you don't provide a keyword, the current keywords are
listed. Example: @code{/keyword manual}.
@end table
A keyword is regular expression matching a word. Thus, if you add the
A keyword is regular expression matching a word. Thus, if you add the
keyword @code{wikis?} then this will match the words ``wiki'' and
``wikis'' but not ``emacswiki''.
......@@ -751,14 +758,14 @@ keyword @code{wikis?} then this will match the words ``wiki'' and
@kindex C-c C-o
@cindex low priority channels
In busy channels you might not be interested in all the joining,
parting, quitting, and renaming that goes on. You can omit those
parting, quitting, and renaming that goes on. You can omit those
notices using @kbd{C-c C-o}.
@vindex rcirc-omit-responses
@cindex away notices, how to omit
You can control which notices get omitted via the
@code{rcirc-omit-responses} variable. Here's an example of how to omit
away messages:
@code{rcirc-omit-responses} variable. Here's an example of how to
omit away messages:
@example
(setq rcirc-omit-responses '("JOIN" "PART" "QUIT" "NICK" "AWAY))
......@@ -766,10 +773,10 @@ away messages:
@vindex rcirc-omit-threshold
Notice that these messages will not be omitted if the nick in question
has recently been active. After all, you don't want to continue a
conversation with somebody who just left. That's why @code{rcirc}
has recently been active. After all, you don't want to continue a
conversation with somebody who just left. That's why @code{rcirc}
checks recent lines in the buffer to figure out if a nick has been
active and only omits a message if the nick has not been active. The
active and only omits a message if the nick has not been active. The
window @code{rcirc} considers is controlled by the
@code{rcirc-omit-threshold} variable.
......
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