Commit 9dd617a6 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor cleanups.

(Rmail): Delete digression about `rmail-mode'.
(Rmail Inbox): Delete false advice wrt rmail-primary-inbox-list.
(Rmail Files): Mention C-u M-x rmail.
(Rmail Reply): Mention References.
(Rmail Display): Mention rmail-nonignored-headers.
parent dfec8297
...@@ -10,15 +10,11 @@ ...@@ -10,15 +10,11 @@
@findex rmail-mode @findex rmail-mode
@vindex rmail-mode-hook @vindex rmail-mode-hook
Rmail is an Emacs subsystem for reading and disposing of mail that you Rmail is an Emacs subsystem for reading and disposing of mail that
receive. Rmail stores mail messages in files called Rmail files. you receive. Rmail stores mail messages in files called Rmail files
Reading the message in an Rmail file is done in a special major mode, which use a special format. Reading the message in an Rmail file is
Rmail mode, which redefines most letters to run commands for managing done in a special major mode, Rmail mode, which redefines most letters
mail. The command @code{rmail-mode} is used to switch into Rmail mode, to run commands for managing mail.
and it runs the hook @code{rmail-mode-hook} as usual, but don't run this
command by hand; it can't do a reasonable job unless the buffer is
visiting a proper Rmail file.
@menu @menu
* Basic: Rmail Basics. Basic concepts of Rmail, and simple use. * Basic: Rmail Basics. Basic concepts of Rmail, and simple use.
* Scroll: Rmail Scrolling. Scrolling through a message. * Scroll: Rmail Scrolling. Scrolling through a message.
...@@ -66,16 +62,16 @@ messages between them. ...@@ -66,16 +62,16 @@ messages between them.
@cindex message number @cindex message number
Within the Rmail file, messages are normally arranged sequentially in Within the Rmail file, messages are normally arranged sequentially in
order of receipt; you can specify other ways to sort them. Messages are order of receipt; you can specify other ways to sort them. Messages are
assigned consecutive integers as their @dfn{message numbers}. The identified by consecutive integers which are their @dfn{message numbers}.
number of the current message is displayed in Rmail's mode line, The number of the current message is displayed in Rmail's mode line,
followed by the total number of messages in the file. You can move to a followed by the total number of messages in the file. You can move to
message by specifying its message number with the @kbd{j} key a message by specifying its message number with the @kbd{j} key
(@pxref{Rmail Motion}). (@pxref{Rmail Motion}).
@kindex s @r{(Rmail)} @kindex s @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-expunge-and-save @findex rmail-expunge-and-save
Following the usual conventions of Emacs, changes in an Rmail file Following the usual conventions of Emacs, changes in an Rmail file
become permanent only when the file is saved. You can save it with become permanent only when you save the file. You can save it with
@kbd{s} (@code{rmail-expunge-and-save}), which also expunges deleted @kbd{s} (@code{rmail-expunge-and-save}), which also expunges deleted
messages from the file first (@pxref{Rmail Deletion}). To save the messages from the file first (@pxref{Rmail Deletion}). To save the
file without expunging, use @kbd{C-x C-s}. Rmail also saves the Rmail file without expunging, use @kbd{C-x C-s}. Rmail also saves the Rmail
...@@ -89,12 +85,12 @@ file after merging new mail from an inbox file (@pxref{Rmail Inbox}). ...@@ -89,12 +85,12 @@ file after merging new mail from an inbox file (@pxref{Rmail Inbox}).
and saves the Rmail file, then buries the Rmail buffer as well as its and saves the Rmail file, then buries the Rmail buffer as well as its
summary buffer, if present (@pxref{Rmail Summary}). But there is no summary buffer, if present (@pxref{Rmail Summary}). But there is no
need to ``exit'' formally. If you switch from Rmail to editing in need to ``exit'' formally. If you switch from Rmail to editing in
other buffers, and never happen to switch back, you have exited. Just other buffers, and never switch back, you have exited. Just make sure
make sure to save the Rmail file eventually (like any other file you to save the Rmail file eventually (like any other file you have
have changed). @kbd{C-x s} is a good enough way to do this changed). @kbd{C-x s} is a suitable way to do this (@pxref{Save
(@pxref{Save Commands}). The Rmail command @kbd{b}, @code{rmail-bury}, Commands}). The Rmail command @kbd{b}, @code{rmail-bury}, buries the
buries the Rmail buffer and its summary buffer without expunging and Rmail buffer and its summary buffer without expunging and saving the
saving the Rmail file. Rmail file.
@node Rmail Scrolling @node Rmail Scrolling
@section Scrolling Within a Message @section Scrolling Within a Message
...@@ -102,7 +98,7 @@ saving the Rmail file. ...@@ -102,7 +98,7 @@ saving the Rmail file.
When Rmail displays a message that does not fit on the screen, you When Rmail displays a message that does not fit on the screen, you
must scroll through it to read the rest. You could do this with must scroll through it to read the rest. You could do this with
@kbd{C-v}, @kbd{M-v} and @kbd{M-<}, but in Rmail scrolling is so @kbd{C-v}, @kbd{M-v} and @kbd{M-<}, but in Rmail scrolling is so
frequent that it deserves to be easier to type. frequent that it deserves to be easier.
@table @kbd @table @kbd
@item @key{SPC} @item @key{SPC}
...@@ -184,7 +180,7 @@ deleted messages---for example, if you want to move to a message to ...@@ -184,7 +180,7 @@ deleted messages---for example, if you want to move to a message to
undelete it---use the variants @kbd{M-n} and @kbd{M-p} undelete it---use the variants @kbd{M-n} and @kbd{M-p}
(@code{rmail-next-message} and @code{rmail-previous-message}). A (@code{rmail-next-message} and @code{rmail-previous-message}). A
numeric argument to any of these commands serves as a repeat numeric argument to any of these commands serves as a repeat
count.@refill count.
In Rmail, you can specify a numeric argument by typing just the In Rmail, you can specify a numeric argument by typing just the
digits. You don't need to type @kbd{C-u} first. digits. You don't need to type @kbd{C-u} first.
...@@ -315,14 +311,13 @@ any time in Rmail by typing @kbd{g}. ...@@ -315,14 +311,13 @@ any time in Rmail by typing @kbd{g}.
files which are inboxes for your primary Rmail file. If you don't set files which are inboxes for your primary Rmail file. If you don't set
this variable explicitly, it is initialized from the @env{MAIL} this variable explicitly, it is initialized from the @env{MAIL}
environment variable, or, as a last resort, set to @code{nil}, which environment variable, or, as a last resort, set to @code{nil}, which
means to use the default inbox. The default inbox is means to use the default inbox. The default inbox file depends on
@file{/var/mail/@var{username}}, @file{/usr/spool/mail/@var{username}}, your operating system; often it is @file{/var/mail/@var{username}},
or @file{/usr/mail/@var{username}}, depending on your operating system. @file{/usr/spool/mail/@var{username}}, or
@file{/usr/mail/@var{username}}.
To see what the default is on your system, use @kbd{C-h v You can specify the inbox file(s) for any Rmail file with the
rmail-primary-inbox-list @key{RET}}. You can specify the inbox file(s) for command @code{set-rmail-inbox-list}; see @ref{Rmail Files}.
any Rmail file with the command @code{set-rmail-inbox-list}; see
@ref{Rmail Files}.
There are two reasons for having separate Rmail files and inboxes. There are two reasons for having separate Rmail files and inboxes.
...@@ -346,18 +341,18 @@ the rest of Rmail, since only Rmail operates on the Rmail file. ...@@ -346,18 +341,18 @@ the rest of Rmail, since only Rmail operates on the Rmail file.
then, we have recognized that the usual inbox format on Unix and GNU then, we have recognized that the usual inbox format on Unix and GNU
systems is adequate for the job, and we plan to change Rmail to use that systems is adequate for the job, and we plan to change Rmail to use that
as its internal format. However, the Rmail file will still be separate as its internal format. However, the Rmail file will still be separate
from the inbox file, even on systems where their format is the same. from the inbox file, even when their format is the same.
@vindex rmail-preserve-inbox @vindex rmail-preserve-inbox
When getting new mail, Rmail first copies the new mail from the inbox When getting new mail, Rmail first copies the new mail from the
file to the Rmail file; then it saves the Rmail file; then it truncates inbox file to the Rmail file; then it saves the Rmail file; then it
the inbox file. This way, a system crash may cause duplication of mail clears out the inbox file. This way, a system crash may cause
between the inbox and the Rmail file, but cannot lose mail. If duplication of mail between the inbox and the Rmail file, but cannot
@code{rmail-preserve-inbox} is non-@code{nil}, then Rmail will copy new lose mail. If @code{rmail-preserve-inbox} is non-@code{nil}, then
mail from the inbox file to the Rmail file without truncating the inbox Rmail does not clear out the inbox file when it gets new mail. You
file. You may wish to set this, for example, on a portable computer you may wish to set this, for example, on a portable computer you use to
use to check your mail via POP while traveling, so that your mail will check your mail via POP while traveling, so that your mail will remain
remain on the server and you can save it later on your workstation. on the server and you can save it later on your workstation.
In some cases, Rmail copies the new mail from the inbox file In some cases, Rmail copies the new mail from the inbox file
indirectly. First it runs the @code{movemail} program to move the mail indirectly. First it runs the @code{movemail} program to move the mail
...@@ -403,10 +398,11 @@ Merge new mail from inbox file @var{file}. ...@@ -403,10 +398,11 @@ Merge new mail from inbox file @var{file}.
@kindex i @r{(Rmail)} @kindex i @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-input @findex rmail-input
To run Rmail on a file other than your primary Rmail file, you may use To run Rmail on a file other than your primary Rmail file, you can use
the @kbd{i} (@code{rmail-input}) command in Rmail. This visits the file the @kbd{i} (@code{rmail-input}) command in Rmail. This visits the file
in Rmail mode. You can use @kbd{M-x rmail-input} even when not in in Rmail mode. You can use @kbd{M-x rmail-input} even when not in
Rmail. Rmail, but it is easier to type @kbd{C-u M-x rmail}, which does the
same thing.
The file you read with @kbd{i} should normally be a valid Rmail file. The file you read with @kbd{i} should normally be a valid Rmail file.
If it is not, Rmail tries to decompose it into a stream of messages in If it is not, Rmail tries to decompose it into a stream of messages in
...@@ -416,23 +412,22 @@ initializes a new buffer for creating a new Rmail file. ...@@ -416,23 +412,22 @@ initializes a new buffer for creating a new Rmail file.
@vindex rmail-secondary-file-directory @vindex rmail-secondary-file-directory
@vindex rmail-secondary-file-regexp @vindex rmail-secondary-file-regexp
You can also select an Rmail file from a menu. Choose first the menu You can also select an Rmail file from a menu. In the Classify menu,
bar Classify item, then from the Classify menu choose the Input Rmail choose the Input Rmail File item; then choose the Rmail file you want.
File item; then choose the Rmail file you want. The variables The variables @code{rmail-secondary-file-directory} and
@code{rmail-secondary-file-directory} and
@code{rmail-secondary-file-regexp} specify which files to offer in the @code{rmail-secondary-file-regexp} specify which files to offer in the
menu: the first variable says which directory to find them in; the menu: the first variable says which directory to find them in; the
second says which files in that directory to offer (all those that match second says which files in that directory to offer (all those that
the regular expression). These variables also apply to choosing a file match the regular expression). These variables also apply to choosing
for output (@pxref{Rmail Output}). a file for output (@pxref{Rmail Output}).
@findex set-rmail-inbox-list @findex set-rmail-inbox-list
Each Rmail file can contain a list of inbox file names; you can specify Each Rmail file can contain a list of inbox file names; you can specify
this list with @kbd{M-x set-rmail-inbox-list @key{RET} @var{files} this list with @kbd{M-x set-rmail-inbox-list @key{RET} @var{files}
@key{RET}}. The argument can contain any number of file names, separated @key{RET}}. The argument can contain any number of file names, separated
by commas. It can also be empty, which specifies that this file should by commas. It can also be empty, which specifies that this file should
have no inboxes. Once a list of inboxes is specified, the Rmail file have no inboxes. Once you specify a list of inboxes in an Rmail file,
remembers it permanently until you specify a different list. the Rmail file remembers it permanently until you specify a different list.
As a special exception, if your primary Rmail file does not specify any As a special exception, if your primary Rmail file does not specify any
inbox files, it uses your standard system inbox. inbox files, it uses your standard system inbox.
...@@ -440,9 +435,9 @@ inbox files, it uses your standard system inbox. ...@@ -440,9 +435,9 @@ inbox files, it uses your standard system inbox.
@kindex g @r{(Rmail)} @kindex g @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-get-new-mail @findex rmail-get-new-mail
The @kbd{g} command (@code{rmail-get-new-mail}) merges mail into the The @kbd{g} command (@code{rmail-get-new-mail}) merges mail into the
current Rmail file from its specified inboxes. If the Rmail file current Rmail file from its inboxes. If the Rmail file has no
has no inboxes, @kbd{g} does nothing. The command @kbd{M-x rmail} inboxes, @kbd{g} does nothing. The command @kbd{M-x rmail} also
also merges new mail into your primary Rmail file. merges new mail into your primary Rmail file.
To merge mail from a file that is not the usual inbox, give the To merge mail from a file that is not the usual inbox, give the
@kbd{g} key a numeric argument, as in @kbd{C-u g}. Then it reads a file @kbd{g} key a numeric argument, as in @kbd{C-u g}. Then it reads a file
...@@ -501,14 +496,14 @@ default for the output file name. However, the file name is read using ...@@ -501,14 +496,14 @@ default for the output file name. However, the file name is read using
the minibuffer, so you can specify a different name if you wish. the minibuffer, so you can specify a different name if you wish.
You can also output a message to an Rmail file chosen with a menu. You can also output a message to an Rmail file chosen with a menu.
Choose first the menu bar Classify item, then from the Classify menu In the Classify menu, choose the Output Rmail File menu item; then
choose the Output Rmail File menu item; then choose the Rmail file you want. choose the Rmail file you want. This outputs the current message to
This outputs the current message to that file, like the @kbd{o} command. that file, like the @kbd{o} command. The variables
The variables @code{rmail-secondary-file-directory} and @code{rmail-secondary-file-directory} and
@code{rmail-secondary-file-regexp} specify which files to offer in the @code{rmail-secondary-file-regexp} specify which files to offer in the
menu: the first variable says which directory to find them in; the menu: the first variable says which directory to find them in; the
second says which files in that directory to offer (all those that match second says which files in that directory to offer (all those that
the regular expression). match the regular expression).
@vindex rmail-delete-after-output @vindex rmail-delete-after-output
Copying a message with @kbd{o} or @kbd{C-o} gives the original copy Copying a message with @kbd{o} or @kbd{C-o} gives the original copy
...@@ -606,7 +601,7 @@ repeat count. ...@@ -606,7 +601,7 @@ repeat count.
(@code{rmail-summary-by-labels}) displays a summary containing only the (@code{rmail-summary-by-labels}) displays a summary containing only the
messages that have at least one of a specified set of labels. The messages that have at least one of a specified set of labels. The
argument @var{labels} is one or more label names, separated by commas. argument @var{labels} is one or more label names, separated by commas.
@xref{Rmail Summary}, for information on summaries.@refill @xref{Rmail Summary}, for information on summaries.
If the @var{labels} argument to @kbd{C-M-n}, @kbd{C-M-p} or If the @var{labels} argument to @kbd{C-M-n}, @kbd{C-M-p} or
@kbd{C-M-l} is empty, it means to use the last set of labels specified @kbd{C-M-l} is empty, it means to use the last set of labels specified
...@@ -616,9 +611,9 @@ for any of these commands. ...@@ -616,9 +611,9 @@ for any of these commands.
@section Rmail Attributes @section Rmail Attributes
Some labels such as @samp{deleted} and @samp{filed} have built-in Some labels such as @samp{deleted} and @samp{filed} have built-in
meanings and are assigned to or removed from messages automatically at meanings, and Rmail assigns them to messages automatically at
appropriate times; these labels are called @dfn{attributes}. Here is a appropriate times; these labels are called @dfn{attributes}. Here is
list of Rmail attributes: a list of Rmail attributes:
@table @samp @table @samp
@item unseen @item unseen
...@@ -648,7 +643,7 @@ Means you have resent the message. Assigned by the command @kbd{M-x ...@@ -648,7 +643,7 @@ Means you have resent the message. Assigned by the command @kbd{M-x
rmail-resend}. @xref{Rmail Reply}. rmail-resend}. @xref{Rmail Reply}.
@end table @end table
All other labels are assigned or removed only by the user, and have no All other labels are assigned or removed only by users, and have no
standard meaning. standard meaning.
@node Rmail Reply @node Rmail Reply
...@@ -659,7 +654,7 @@ standard meaning. ...@@ -659,7 +654,7 @@ standard meaning.
certain features meant to work with Rmail. What this section documents certain features meant to work with Rmail. What this section documents
are the special commands of Rmail for entering Mail mode. Note that the are the special commands of Rmail for entering Mail mode. Note that the
usual keys for sending mail---@kbd{C-x m}, @kbd{C-x 4 m}, and @kbd{C-x 5 usual keys for sending mail---@kbd{C-x m}, @kbd{C-x 4 m}, and @kbd{C-x 5
m}---are available in Rmail mode and work just as they usually do. m}---also work normally in Rmail mode.
@table @kbd @table @kbd
@item m @item m
...@@ -679,15 +674,15 @@ Try sending a bounced message a second time (@code{rmail-retry-failure}). ...@@ -679,15 +674,15 @@ Try sending a bounced message a second time (@code{rmail-retry-failure}).
@kindex r @r{(Rmail)} @kindex r @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-reply @findex rmail-reply
@cindex reply to a message @cindex reply to a message
The most common reason to send a message while in Rmail is to reply to The most common reason to send a message while in Rmail is to reply
the message you are reading. To do this, type @kbd{r} to the message you are reading. To do this, type @kbd{r}
(@code{rmail-reply}). This displays the @samp{*mail*} buffer in another (@code{rmail-reply}). This displays the @samp{*mail*} buffer in
window, much like @kbd{C-x 4 m}, but preinitializes the @samp{Subject}, another window, much like @kbd{C-x 4 m}, but preinitializes the
@samp{To}, @samp{CC} and @samp{In-reply-to} header fields based on the @samp{Subject}, @samp{To}, @samp{CC}, @samp{In-reply-to} and
message you are replying to. The @samp{To} field starts out as the @samp{References} header fields based on the message you are replying
address of the person who sent the message you received, and the to. The @samp{To} field starts out as the address of the person who
@samp{CC} field starts out with all the other recipients of that sent the message you received, and the @samp{CC} field starts out with
message. all the other recipients of that message.
@vindex rmail-dont-reply-to-names @vindex rmail-dont-reply-to-names
You can exclude certain recipients from being placed automatically in You can exclude certain recipients from being placed automatically in
...@@ -700,13 +695,14 @@ of using them for large mailing lists to broadcast announcements.) ...@@ -700,13 +695,14 @@ of using them for large mailing lists to broadcast announcements.)
To omit the @samp{CC} field completely for a particular reply, enter To omit the @samp{CC} field completely for a particular reply, enter
the reply command with a numeric argument: @kbd{C-u r} or @kbd{1 r}. the reply command with a numeric argument: @kbd{C-u r} or @kbd{1 r}.
This means to reply only to the sender of the original message.
Once the @samp{*mail*} buffer has been initialized, editing and Once the @samp{*mail*} buffer has been initialized, editing and
sending the mail goes as usual (@pxref{Sending Mail}). You can edit the sending the mail goes as usual (@pxref{Sending Mail}). You can edit the
presupplied header fields if they are not right for you. You can also presupplied header fields if they are not what you want. You can also
use the commands of Mail mode (@pxref{Mail Mode}), including @kbd{C-c use the commands of Mail mode (@pxref{Mail Mode}), including @kbd{C-c
C-y} which yanks in the message that you are replying to. You can C-y} which yanks in the message that you are replying to. You can
switch to the Rmail buffer, select a different message there, switch also switch to the Rmail buffer, select a different message there, switch
back, and yank the new current message. back, and yank the new current message.
@kindex M-m @r{(Rmail)} @kindex M-m @r{(Rmail)}
...@@ -764,13 +760,13 @@ outgoing message that is not a reply. It leaves the header fields empty. ...@@ -764,13 +760,13 @@ outgoing message that is not a reply. It leaves the header fields empty.
Its only difference from @kbd{C-x 4 m} is that it makes the Rmail buffer Its only difference from @kbd{C-x 4 m} is that it makes the Rmail buffer
accessible for @kbd{C-c C-y}, just as @kbd{r} does. Thus, @kbd{m} can be accessible for @kbd{C-c C-y}, just as @kbd{r} does. Thus, @kbd{m} can be
used to reply to or forward a message; it can do anything @kbd{r} or @kbd{f} used to reply to or forward a message; it can do anything @kbd{r} or @kbd{f}
can do.@refill can do.
@kindex c @r{(Rmail)} @kindex c @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-continue @findex rmail-continue
The @kbd{c} (@code{rmail-continue}) command resumes editing the The @kbd{c} (@code{rmail-continue}) command resumes editing the
@samp{*mail*} buffer, to finish editing an outgoing message you were @samp{*mail*} buffer, to finish editing an outgoing message you were
already composing, or to alter a message you have sent.@refill already composing, or to alter a message you have sent.
@vindex rmail-mail-new-frame @vindex rmail-mail-new-frame
If you set the variable @code{rmail-mail-new-frame} to a If you set the variable @code{rmail-mail-new-frame} to a
...@@ -845,14 +841,14 @@ It then displays and selects the summary buffer in another window. ...@@ -845,14 +841,14 @@ It then displays and selects the summary buffer in another window.
@kbd{C-M-l @var{labels} @key{RET}} (@code{rmail-summary-by-labels}) makes @kbd{C-M-l @var{labels} @key{RET}} (@code{rmail-summary-by-labels}) makes
a partial summary mentioning only the messages that have one or more of the a partial summary mentioning only the messages that have one or more of the
labels @var{labels}. @var{labels} should contain label names separated by labels @var{labels}. @var{labels} should contain label names separated by
commas.@refill commas.
@kindex C-M-r @r{(Rmail)} @kindex C-M-r @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-summary-by-recipients @findex rmail-summary-by-recipients
@kbd{C-M-r @var{rcpts} @key{RET}} (@code{rmail-summary-by-recipients}) @kbd{C-M-r @var{rcpts} @key{RET}} (@code{rmail-summary-by-recipients})
makes a partial summary mentioning only the messages that have one or more makes a partial summary mentioning only the messages that have one or more
of the recipients @var{rcpts}. @var{rcpts} should contain mailing of the recipients @var{rcpts}. @var{rcpts} should contain mailing
addresses separated by commas.@refill addresses separated by commas.
@kindex C-M-t @r{(Rmail)} @kindex C-M-t @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-summary-by-topic @findex rmail-summary-by-topic
...@@ -867,8 +863,8 @@ makes a partial summary which mentions only the messages whose headers ...@@ -867,8 +863,8 @@ makes a partial summary which mentions only the messages whose headers
(including the date and the subject lines) match the regular (including the date and the subject lines) match the regular
expression @var{regexp}. expression @var{regexp}.
Note that there is only one summary buffer for any Rmail file; making one Note that there is only one summary buffer for any Rmail file;
kind of summary discards any previously made summary. making any kind of summary discards any previous summary.
@vindex rmail-summary-window-size @vindex rmail-summary-window-size
@vindex rmail-summary-line-count-flag @vindex rmail-summary-line-count-flag
...@@ -1007,19 +1003,25 @@ Toggle display of complete header (@code{rmail-toggle-header}). ...@@ -1007,19 +1003,25 @@ Toggle display of complete header (@code{rmail-toggle-header}).
@end table @end table
@vindex rmail-ignored-headers @vindex rmail-ignored-headers
@vindex rmail-nonignored-headers
Reformatting the header involves deleting most header fields, on the Reformatting the header involves deleting most header fields, on the
grounds that they are not interesting. The variable grounds that they are not interesting. The variable
@code{rmail-ignored-headers} holds a regular expression that specifies @code{rmail-ignored-headers} holds a regular expression that specifies
which header fields to hide in this way---if it matches the beginning of which header fields to hide in this way---if it matches the beginning
a header field, that whole field is hidden. of a header field, that whole field is hidden. However, the variable
@code{rmail-nonignored-headers} provides a further override: a header
matching that regular expression is shown even if it matches
@code{rmail-ignored-headers} too.
@kindex t @r{(Rmail)} @kindex t @r{(Rmail)}
@findex rmail-toggle-header @findex rmail-toggle-header
Rmail saves the complete original header before reformatting; to see Rmail saves the complete original header before reformatting; to see
it, use the @kbd{t} command (@code{rmail-toggle-header}). This it, use the @kbd{t} command (@code{rmail-toggle-header}). This
discards the reformatted headers of the current message and displays it discards the reformatted headers of the current message and displays
with the original header. Repeating @kbd{t} reformats the message it with the original header. Repeating @kbd{t} reformats the message
again. Selecting the message again also reformats. again, which shows only the interesting headers according to the
current values of those variable. Selecting the message again also
reformats it if necessary.
One consequence of this is that if you edit the reformatted header One consequence of this is that if you edit the reformatted header
(using @kbd{e}; @pxref{Rmail Editing}), subsequent use of @kbd{t} will (using @kbd{e}; @pxref{Rmail Editing}), subsequent use of @kbd{t} will
...@@ -1041,10 +1043,10 @@ of a header field, that whole field is highlighted. ...@@ -1041,10 +1043,10 @@ of a header field, that whole field is highlighted.
If you specify unusual colors for your text foreground and If you specify unusual colors for your text foreground and
background, the colors used for highlighting may not go well with background, the colors used for highlighting may not go well with
them. If so, specify different colors for the face them. If so, specify different colors by setting the variable
@code{rmail-highlight-face}. @xref{Faces}, for how to do this. To @code{rmail-highlight-face} to a suitable face. To turn off
turn off highlighting entirely in Rmail, set highlighting entirely in Rmail, set @code{rmail-highlighted-headers}
@code{rmail-highlighted-headers} to @code{nil}. to @code{nil}.
You can highlight and activate URLs in incoming messages by adding You can highlight and activate URLs in incoming messages by adding
the function @code{goto-address} to the hook the function @code{goto-address} to the hook
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