Commit 9f174f63 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Single-Byte Character Support): Delete mention

of iso-acc.el and iso-transl.el.
parent 87101b33
2005-03-24 Richard M. Stallman <rms@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Single-Byte Character Support): Delete mention
of iso-acc.el and iso-transl.el.
* calc.texi: Remove praise of non-free software.
* idlwave.texi: Don't say where to get IDL or its non-free manual.
(Installation): Node deleted.
2005-03-23 Lute Kamstra <lute@gnu.org>
* search.texi (Non-ASCII Isearch): Rename from Non-Ascii Isearch.
......
......@@ -1333,62 +1333,31 @@ inclusive) are displayed as octal escapes. You can change this for
non-standard ``extended'' versions of ISO-8859 character sets by using the
function @code{standard-display-8bit} in the @code{disp-table} library.
There are several ways you can input single-byte non-@acronym{ASCII}
There are two ways to input single-byte non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters:
@itemize @bullet
@cindex 8-bit input
@item
If your keyboard can generate character codes 128 (decimal) and up,
representing non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, you can type those character codes
directly.
On a windowing terminal, you should not need to do anything special to
use these keys; they should simply work. On a text-only terminal, you
should use the command @code{M-x set-keyboard-coding-system} or the
variable @code{keyboard-coding-system} to specify which coding
system your keyboard uses (@pxref{Specify Coding}). Enabling this
feature will probably require you to use @kbd{ESC} to type Meta
characters; however, on a console terminal or in @code{xterm}, you can
arrange for Meta to be converted to @kbd{ESC} and still be able type
8-bit characters present directly on the keyboard or using
@kbd{Compose} or @kbd{AltGr} keys. @xref{User Input}.
@item
You can use an input method for the selected language environment.
@xref{Input Methods}. When you use an input method in a unibyte buffer,
the non-@acronym{ASCII} character you specify with it is converted to unibyte.
@kindex C-x 8
@cindex @code{iso-transl} library
@cindex compose character
@cindex dead character
@item
For Latin-1 only, you can use the
key @kbd{C-x 8} as a ``compose character'' prefix for entry of
non-@acronym{ASCII} Latin-1 printing characters. @kbd{C-x 8} is good for
insertion (in the minibuffer as well as other buffers), for searching,
and in any other context where a key sequence is allowed.
@kbd{C-x 8} works by loading the @code{iso-transl} library. Once that
library is loaded, the @key{ALT} modifier key, if you have one, serves
the same purpose as @kbd{C-x 8}; use @key{ALT} together with an accent
character to modify the following letter. In addition, if you have keys
for the Latin-1 ``dead accent characters,'' they too are defined to
compose with the following character, once @code{iso-transl} is loaded.
Use @kbd{C-x 8 C-h} to list the available translations as mnemonic
command names.
If your keyboard can generate character codes 128 (decimal) and up,
representing non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, you can type those character codes
directly.
@item
@cindex @code{iso-acc} library
@cindex ISO Accents mode
@findex iso-accents-mode
@cindex Latin-1, Latin-2 and Latin-3 input mode
For Latin-1, Latin-2 and Latin-3, @kbd{M-x iso-accents-mode} enables
a minor mode that works much like the @code{latin-1-prefix} input
method, but does not depend on having the input methods installed. This
mode is buffer-local. It can be customized for various languages with
@kbd{M-x iso-accents-customize}.
On a window system, you should not need to do anything special to use
these keys; they should simply work. On a text-only terminal, you
should use the command @code{M-x set-keyboard-coding-system} or the
variable @code{keyboard-coding-system} to specify which coding system
your keyboard uses (@pxref{Specify Coding}). Enabling this feature
will probably require you to use @kbd{ESC} to type Meta characters;
however, on a console terminal or in @code{xterm}, you can arrange for
Meta to be converted to @kbd{ESC} and still be able type 8-bit
characters present directly on the keyboard or using @kbd{Compose} or
@kbd{AltGr} keys. @xref{User Input}.
@end itemize
@node Charsets
......
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