Commit a067ef9a authored by Tassilo Horn's avatar Tassilo Horn Committed by Katsumi Yamaoka
Browse files

doc/misc/{gnus.texi,gnus-faq.texi}: Add link to EWW manual

* gnus.texi (HTML): Update section so that it mentions shr and w3m.
Also link the full EWW manual that explains more on shr, too.

* gnus-faq.texi (FAQ 4 - Reading messages, FAQ 4-16): Add Q&A on how to
increase contrast when displaying HTML mail with shr.
parent 361ffe13
2014-11-07 Tassilo Horn <tsdh@gnu.org>
* gnus.texi (HTML): Update section so that it mentions shr and w3m.
Also link the full EWW manual that explains more on shr, too.
* gnus-faq.texi (FAQ 4 - Reading messages, FAQ 4-16): Add Q&A on how to
increase contrast when displaying HTML mail with shr.
* eww.texi (Advanced): Document increasing contrast with
shr-color-visible-distance-min and
shr-color-visible-luminance-min.
......
......@@ -742,6 +742,7 @@ POP3 mail source. See @pxref{Mail Source Specifiers} for VALUE.
* FAQ 4-14:: I don't like the way the Summary buffer looks, how to
tweak it?
* FAQ 4-15:: How to split incoming mails in several groups?
* FAQ 4-16:: How can I ensure more contrast when viewing HTML mail?
@end menu
@node FAQ 4-1
......@@ -1185,6 +1186,21 @@ from using them):
@end example
@noindent
@node FAQ 4-16
@subsubheading Question 4.16
How can I ensure more contrast when viewing HTML mail?
@subsubheading Answer
Gnus' built-in simple HTML renderer (you use it if the value of
@code{mm-text-html-renderer} is @code{shr}) uses the colors which are
declared in the HTML mail. However, it adjusts them in order to
prevent situations like dark gray text on black background. In case
the results still have a too low contrast for you, increase the values
of the variables @code{shr-color-visible-distance-min} and
@code{shr-color-visible-luminance-min}.
@node FAQ 5 - Composing messages
@subsection Composing messages
......
......@@ -11761,20 +11761,31 @@ Also @pxref{MIME Commands}.
@section @acronym{HTML}
@cindex @acronym{HTML}
 
If you have @code{w3m} installed on your system, Gnus can display
@acronym{HTML} articles in the article buffer. There are many Gnus
add-ons for doing this, using various approaches, but there's one
(sort of) built-in method that's used by default.
For a complete overview, consult @xref{Display Customization,
,Display Customization, emacs-mime, The Emacs MIME Manual}. This
section only describes the default method.
Gnus can display @acronym{HTML} articles nicely formatted in the
article buffer. There are many methods for doing that, but two of
them are kind of default methods.
If your Emacs copy has been built with libxml2 support, then Gnus uses
Emacs' built-in, plain elisp Simple HTML Renderer @code{shr}
@footnote{@code{shr} displays colors as declared in the @acronym{HTML}
article but tries to adjust them in order to be readable. If you
prefer more contrast, have a look at question 4.16 in the
@xref{Frequently Asked Questions}.} which is also used by Emacs'
browser EWW (@xref{Top,,,eww}).
If your Emacs copy lacks libxml2 support but you have @code{w3m}
installed on your system, Gnus uses that to render @acronym{HTML} mail
and display the results in the article buffer (@code{gnus-w3m}).
For a complete overview, consult @xref{Display Customization, ,Display
Customization, emacs-mime, The Emacs MIME Manual}. This section only
describes the default method.
 
@table @code
@item mm-text-html-renderer
@vindex mm-text-html-renderer
If set to @code{gnus-article-html}, Gnus will use the built-in method,
that's based on @code{w3m}.
If set to @code{shr}, Gnus uses its own simple @acronym{HTML}
renderer. If set to @code{gnus-w3m}, it uses @code{w3m}.
 
@item gnus-blocked-images
@vindex gnus-blocked-images
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment