Commit a0706406 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

More small edits for doc/emacs/glossary.texi

* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Copyedits.
New items: Bidirectional Text, Client, Directory Local Variable,
File Local Variable, Server, Theme, Trash Can.

* admin/FOR-RELEASE: Related markup.
parent 8a18dcb0
......@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ files.texi cyd
fixit.texi cyd
fortran-xtra.texi rgm
frames.texi cyd
glossary.texi
glossary.texi rgm
help.texi cyd
indent.texi cyd
killing.texi cyd
......
......@@ -3,6 +3,8 @@
* glossary.texi (Glossary): Copyedits.
Use Texinfo-recommended convention for quotes and punctuation.
Comment out a few specialized (Rmail) items.
New items: Bidirectional Text, Client, Directory Local Variable,
File Local Variable, Server, Theme, Trash Can.
2012-04-03 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -5,6 +5,10 @@
@node Glossary, Key Index, Intro, Top
@unnumbered Glossary
@c It would be nice if texinfo could add internal links from one item
@c to another here. Eg when we say "see also `foo bar'", there would
@c be a hyperlink to the foo bar item.
@table @asis
@item Abbrev
An abbrev is a text string that expands into a different text string
......@@ -17,6 +21,8 @@ Aborting means getting out of a recursive edit (q.v.@:). The
commands @kbd{C-]} and @kbd{M-x top-level} are used for this.
@xref{Quitting}.
@c FIXME? Active Region
@item Alt
Alt is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
have. To make a character Alt, type it while holding down the @key{ALT}
......@@ -87,6 +93,12 @@ See `tooltips'.
A base buffer is a buffer whose text is shared by an indirect buffer
(q.v.@:).
@item Bidirectional Text
Some human languages, such as English, are written from left to right.
Others, such as Arabic, are written from right to left. Emacs
supports both of these forms, as well as any mixture of them---this
is `bidirectional text'. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
@item Bind
To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.@:).
@xref{Rebinding}.
......@@ -175,6 +187,9 @@ A click event is the kind of input event (q.v.@:) generated when you
press a mouse button and release it without moving the mouse.
@xref{Mouse Buttons}.
@item Client
See `server'.
@item Clipboard
A clipboard is a buffer provided by the window system for transferring
text between applications. On the X Window system, the clipboard is
......@@ -363,6 +378,11 @@ File directories are named collections in the file system, within which
you can place individual files or subdirectories. They are sometimes
referred to as ``folders''. @xref{Directories}.
@item Directory Local Variable
A directory local variable is a local variable (q.v.@:) that applies
to all the files within a certain directory. @xref{Directory
Variables}.
@item Dired
Dired is the Emacs facility that displays the contents of a file
directory and allows you to ``edit the directory'', performing
......@@ -387,6 +407,9 @@ you type on the keyboard. Dribble files can be used to make a record
for debugging Emacs bugs. Emacs does not make a dribble file unless you
tell it to. @xref{Bugs}.
@c TODO? Not really appropriate for the user manual I think.
@c Dynamic Binding
@item Echo Area
The echo area is the bottom line of the screen, used for echoing the
arguments to commands, for asking questions, and showing brief messages
......@@ -461,11 +484,16 @@ features to associate specific faces with portions of buffer text, in
order to display that text as specified by the face attributes.
@xref{Faces}.
@item File Local Variable
A file local variable is a local variable (q.v.@:) specified in a
given file. @xref{File Variables}. See also `directory variable'.
@item File Locking
Emacs uses file locking to notice when two different users
start to edit one file at the same time. @xref{Interlocking}.
@item File Name
@c This is fairly tautological...
A file name is a name that refers to a file. File names may be relative
or absolute; the meaning of a relative file name depends on the current
directory, but an absolute file name refers to the same file regardless
......@@ -496,11 +524,12 @@ text to be filled. @xref{Filling}.
Filling text means adjusting the position of line-breaks to shift text
between consecutive lines, so that all the lines are approximately the
same length. @xref{Filling}. Some other editors call this feature
`line wrapping'.
``line wrapping''.
@item Font Lock
Font Lock is a mode that highlights parts of buffer text in different
faces, according to the syntax. For example, all comments (q.v.@:)
faces, according to the syntax. Some other editors refer to this as
``syntax highlighting''. For example, all comments (q.v.@:)
might be colored red. @xref{Font Lock}.
@item Fontset
......@@ -534,7 +563,7 @@ For more information, see @uref{http://fsf.org/, the FSF website}.
@item Fringe
On a graphical display (q.v.@:), there's a narrow portion of the frame
(q.v.@:) between the text area and the window's border. These
`fringes' are used to display symbols that provide information about
``fringes'' are used to display symbols that provide information about
the buffer text (@pxref{Fringes}). Emacs displays the fringe using a
special face (q.v.@:) called @code{fringe}. @xref{Faces,fringe}.
......@@ -613,14 +642,14 @@ printing the contents of Emacs buffers. @xref{Printing}.
@item @key{HELP}
@key{HELP} is the Emacs name for @kbd{C-h} or @key{F1}. You can type
@key{HELP} at any time to ask what options you have, or to ask what any
@key{HELP} at any time to ask what options you have, or to ask what a
command does. @xref{Help}.
@item Help Echo
Help echo is a short message displayed in the echo area (q.v.@:) when
the mouse pointer is located on portions of display that require some
explanations. Emacs displays help echo for menu items, parts of the
mode line, tool-bar buttons, etc. On graphics displays, the messages
mode line, tool-bar buttons, etc. On graphical displays, the messages
can be displayed as tooltips (q.v.@:). @xref{Tooltips}.
@item Home Directory
......@@ -650,7 +679,7 @@ many are unfamiliar with it and mistake it for a typo.
@item Inbox
An inbox is a file in which mail is delivered by the operating system.
Rmail transfers mail from inboxes to Rmail files (q.v.@:) in which the
Rmail transfers mail from inboxes to Rmail files in which the
mail is then stored permanently or until explicitly deleted.
@xref{Rmail Inbox}.
......@@ -689,9 +718,7 @@ Insertion means adding text into the buffer, either from the keyboard
or from some other place in Emacs.
@item Interlocking
Interlocking is a feature for warning when you start to alter a file
that someone else is already editing.
@xref{Interlocking,Interlocking,Simultaneous Editing}.
See `file locking'.
@item Isearch
See `incremental search'.
......@@ -712,7 +739,7 @@ play them back as many times as you like.
@cindex keyboard shortcuts
@item Keyboard Shortcut
A keyboard shortcut is a key sequence (q.v.@:) which invokes a
A keyboard shortcut is a key sequence (q.v.@:) that invokes a
command. What some programs call ``assigning a keyboard shortcut'',
Emacs calls ``binding a key sequence''. See `binding'.
......@@ -734,9 +761,9 @@ codes that come from the terminal into the character codes that make up
key sequences.
@item Kill Ring
The kill ring is where all text you have killed recently is saved.
You can reinsert any of the killed text still in the ring; this is
called yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Yanking}.
The kill ring is where all text you have killed (see `killing')
recently is saved. You can reinsert any of the killed text still in
the ring; this is called yanking (q.v.@:). @xref{Yanking}.
@item Killing
Killing means erasing text and saving it on the kill ring so it can be
......@@ -755,6 +782,9 @@ method (q.v.@:) and coding system (q.v.@:). @xref{Language
Environments}. These defaults are relevant if you edit
non-@acronym{ASCII} text (@pxref{International}).
@c TODO? Not really appropriate for the user manual I think.
@c Lexical Binding
@item Line Wrapping
See `filling'.
......@@ -834,7 +864,7 @@ all the text from point to the mark. Each buffer has its own mark.
@item Mark Ring
The mark ring is used to hold several recent previous locations of the
mark, just in case you want to move back to them. Each buffer has its
mark, in case you want to move back to them. Each buffer has its
own mark ring; in addition, there is a single global mark ring (q.v.@:).
@xref{Mark Ring}.
......@@ -873,7 +903,7 @@ for minibuffer arguments, so you can conveniently use the same text
again. @xref{Minibuffer History}.
@item Minor Mode
A minor mode is an optional feature of Emacs which can be switched on
A minor mode is an optional feature of Emacs, which can be switched on
or off independently of all other features. Each minor mode has a
command to turn it on or off. Some minor modes are global (q.v.@:),
and some are local (q.v.@:). @xref{Minor Modes}.
......@@ -911,7 +941,7 @@ since the number of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters is much more than 256.
@xref{International Chars, International Characters}.
@item Named Mark
A named mark is a register (q.v.@:) in its role of recording a
A named mark is a register (q.v.@:), in its role of recording a
location in text so that you can move point to that location.
@xref{Registers}.
......@@ -940,11 +970,16 @@ repeat count. @xref{Arguments}.
@item Overwrite Mode
Overwrite mode is a minor mode. When it is enabled, ordinary text
characters replace the existing text after point rather than pushing
it to the right. @xref{Minor Modes}.
it to one side. @xref{Minor Modes}.
@item Package
A package is a collection of Lisp code that you download and
automatically install from within Emacs. Packages provide a
convenient way to add new features. @xref{Packages}.
@item Page
A page is a unit of text, delimited by formfeed characters (@acronym{ASCII}
control-L, code 014) coming at the beginning of a line. Some Emacs
control-L, code 014) at the beginning of a line. Some Emacs
commands are provided for moving over and operating on pages.
@xref{Pages}.
......@@ -1163,6 +1198,20 @@ are self-inserting in Emacs, except in certain special major modes.
Emacs has commands for moving by or killing by sentences.
@xref{Sentences}.
@item Server
Within Emacs, you can start a `server' process, which listens for
connections from `clients'. This offers a faster alternative to
starting several Emacs instances. @xref{Emacs Server}. See also
`daemon'.
@c This is only covered in the lispref, not the user manual.
@ignore
@item Session Manager
Some window systems (q.v.@:) provide a tool called a `session manager'.
This offers the ability to save your windows when you log off,
and restore them after you log in again.
@end ignore
@item Sexp
A sexp (short for ``s-expression'') is the basic syntactic unit of
Lisp in its textual form: either a list, or Lisp atom. Sexps are also
......@@ -1193,7 +1242,7 @@ spelling-checker programs to check the spelling of parts of a buffer
via a convenient user interface. @xref{Spelling}.
@item String
A string is a kind of Lisp data object which contains a sequence of
A string is a kind of Lisp data object that contains a sequence of
characters. Many Emacs variables are intended to have strings as
values. The Lisp syntax for a string consists of the characters in the
string with a @samp{"} before and another @samp{"} after. A @samp{"}
......@@ -1267,6 +1316,11 @@ Text properties are annotations recorded for particular characters in
the buffer. Images in the buffer are recorded as text properties;
they also specify formatting information. @xref{Editing Format Info}.
@item Theme
A theme is a set of customizations (q.v.@:) that give Emacs a
particular appearance or behavior. For example, you might use a theme
for your favorite set of faces (q.v.@:).
@item Tool Bar
The tool bar is a line (sometimes multiple lines) of icons at the top
of an Emacs frame. Clicking on one of these icons executes a command.
......@@ -1285,12 +1339,17 @@ are not in a recursive editing level (q.v.@:) or the minibuffer
(q.v.@:), and not in the middle of a command. You can get back to top
level by aborting (q.v.@:) and quitting (q.v.@:). @xref{Quitting}.
@c FIXME? Transient Mark Mode
@item Transposition
Transposing two units of text means putting each one into the place
formerly occupied by the other. There are Emacs commands to transpose
two adjacent characters, words, balanced expressions (q.v.@:) or lines
(@pxref{Transpose}).
@item Trash Can
See `deletion of files'.
@item Truncation
Truncating text lines in the display means leaving out any text on a
line that does not fit within the right margin of the window
......
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