Commit a2eb421b authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

In Lisp manual, don't capitalize pty.

* doc/lispref/processes.texi (Asynchronous Processes, Input to Processes):
* doc/lispref/internals.texi (Process Internals): Don't capitalize "pty".
parent 157e99e4
2012-06-27 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* processes.texi (Asynchronous Processes, Input to Processes):
* internals.texi (Process Internals): Don't capitalize "pty".
2012-06-24 Thien-Thi Nguyen <ttn@gnuvola.org>
* processes.texi (Asynchronous Processes): Make the pty vs pipe
......
......@@ -1380,7 +1380,7 @@ needs to be reported, either by running the sentinel or by inserting a
message in the process buffer.
@item pty_flag
Non-@code{nil} if communication with the subprocess uses a @acronym{PTY};
Non-@code{nil} if communication with the subprocess uses a pty;
@code{nil} if it uses a pipe.
@item infd
......
......@@ -666,7 +666,7 @@ can also be executed on remote hosts, depending on @code{default-directory}.
@defvar process-connection-type
This variable controls the type of device used to communicate with
asynchronous subprocesses. If it is non-@code{nil}, then @acronym{PTY}s are
asynchronous subprocesses. If it is non-@code{nil}, then ptys are
used, when available. Otherwise, pipes are used.
The value of @code{process-connection-type} takes effect when
......@@ -681,8 +681,8 @@ with one subprocess by binding the variable around the call to
@end group
@end smallexample
To determine whether a given subprocess actually got a pipe or a
@acronym{PTY}, use the function @code{process-tty-name} (@pxref{Process
To determine whether a given subprocess actually got a pipe or a pty,
use the function @code{process-tty-name} (@pxref{Process
Information}).
@end defvar
......@@ -960,9 +960,9 @@ data appears on the ``standard input'' of the subprocess.
@c FIXME which?
Some operating systems have limited space for buffered input in a
@acronym{PTY}. On these systems, Emacs sends an @acronym{EOF}
periodically amidst the other characters, to force them through. For
most programs, these @acronym{EOF}s do no harm.
pty. On these systems, Emacs sends an @acronym{EOF} periodically
amidst the other characters, to force them through. For most
programs, these @acronym{EOF}s do no harm.
Subprocess input is normally encoded using a coding system before the
subprocess receives it, much like text written into a file. You can use
......
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